Critique Drop Art Photos with COVID-19

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Though I planned for these photos to be in color with blue and yellow tones, most areas of the subjects were silhouettes. So, I converted them to monochrome.

I learned from this photo session that if I use even a really small amount of cream in the mixture, lighting from the front must be used if I don't want most parts of the formations to appear as silhouettes. I thought sure that most parts of the formations would be translucent or transparent, but not so. That's despite that the mixture was about 90% water and only 10% cream. I used four flash units behind a piece of frosted acrylic and learned that I need two more flash units to add lighting from the front. Hopefully Santa is paying attention.

Mike 2020-12-01--0940-S.jpg
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Mike 2020-12-01--0950-S.jpg
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Mike 2020-12-01--1012-S.jpg
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As a matter of personal taste I like the colors better. Or the clear liquids. The silhouette loses the 3D aspect which I find interesting. In 2D it becomes a psych test :D

The opaque effect likely due to the fact that white reflects the entire light spectrum while colored dyes filter out/reflect only certain colors/wavelengths. Just a thought.
 
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I don't understand the connection to Covid-19. Are you saying you have Covid?
When you compare the shapes of these to most of the other drop art photos I've made, these look so convoluted that I'm joking that they have COVID. Fortunately, nobody in my family has contracted it.

The opaque effect likely due to the fact that white reflects the entire light spectrum while colored dyes filter out/reflect only certain colors/wavelengths. Just a thought.
The opaque effect has nothing to do with color; it has to do with density of the liquid, which is either transparent, translucent or opaque. When an opaque object is lit only from behind, it appears as a silhouette. That explains why these appear as a silhouette for the most part.

The silhouette loses the 3D aspect which I find interesting.
I agree.
 
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In all of these dark images it is the base, the "boiling cauldron" that has my interest. I'm reading them bottom up. Whereas, in all of your other work, and even West's versions, i read them top down. Why, I wonder?
It's not the wine, I checked!
 
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In all of these dark images it is the base, the "boiling cauldron" that has my interest. I'm reading them bottom up. Whereas, in all of your other work, and even West's versions, i read them top down. Why, I wonder?
Now that I've thought about that, I wonder if it's because that part of the image, unlike most of the rest of the image, displays shadows and, thus, appears more three-dimensional. The light source was above the surface of the catch basin rather than directly behind it, which explains why its surface displays shadows.
 
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Now that I've thought about that, I wonder if it's because that part of the image, unlike most of the rest of the image, displays shadows and, thus, appears more three-dimensional. The light source was above the surface of the catch basin rather than directly behind it, which explains why its surface displays shadows.
I can buy that.
 

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