Dust in my sensor :(

Joined
Jul 18, 2010
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12
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Santa Clarita, CA
i'm looking for a good sensor (DX format) cleaning kit and a scope with built in light. also a good tutorial how to clean the sensor. links will be a big help. thanks.
 
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Chris
You probably don't need the scope. Most proven methods (copperhill, sensor-swaps & eclipse, etc.) clean the entire sensor, not just the obvious dust motes, which is what a scope will show you.
 
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Jan 29, 2009
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You probably don't need the scope. Most proven methods (copperhill, sensor-swaps & eclipse, etc.) clean the entire sensor, not just the obvious dust motes, which is what a scope will show you.

Your US company Carson produce a very good/very inexpensive illuminator that is invaluable at the price, highly recommended.
 
Joined
Oct 17, 2007
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Orland Park, Illinois
I went with the Copper Hill method and tools. http://www.copperhillimages.com/

FWIW, I just use the Basic Kit with the QuickStrips. It took a number of tries to get it clean the first time. But it's pretty easy. Just read the tutorial a few times before actually doing it.

I highly recommend the Copperhill method and kit. For the price of just one professional cleaning, you can clean your sensor many, many times.

Most of the time, the Rocket Blower removes the dust from my sensor. When that doesn't do the trick, I try using the sensor brush that's included in the kit (a dry clean). If that still doesn't remove the dust, I move to the wet cleaning. I've only had to wet clean my sensor three times in the past two years even though I shoot often and change lenses frequently.

If I were to send my camera into Melville for a cleaning, Nikon would charge me more to clean my sensor than the cost of the entire Copperhill kit. And, I would be without my camera for two weeks at least. I would rather take a few minutes to clean my own sensor at my own convenience--and the incremental cost of a cleaning right now is about 10 cents.

Glenn
 
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Feb 5, 2007
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Banff National Park, Alberta
I paid a professional $90 to clean the sensor on my D700. If the sensor is damaged, the camera is almost worthless as a replacement is $1600.

Yeah but as I understand it you have to do something willfully bad to screw up one of these sensors. There's a fellow here that claims he cleaned his D3 with a chopstick and a napkin.

I just went to town on my D700 with a $20 visible dust kit and I can report that nothing went wrong. There's still a spot or two left but that's ok. No massive streaks, the camera didn't explode or anything.
 
Joined
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Yeah but as I understand it you have to do something willfully bad to screw up one of these sensors. There's a fellow here that claims he cleaned his D3 with a chopstick and a napkin.

I just went to town on my D700 with a $20 visible dust kit and I can report that nothing went wrong. There's still a spot or two left but that's ok. No massive streaks, the camera didn't explode or anything.

I attended a workshop led by Moose Peterson. The first segment of the workshop was about how to clean your digital sensor. Moose cleaned his sensor in front of the group in no time. He kept emphasizing how difficult it would be to scratch it. It would be like scratching an expensive glass table by rubbing a Q-Tip against it.

Moose cleans his sensor far more often than I do. I believe he said that he cleans it multiple times per week. Then again, he was using the camera a lot each day and was using a D3 at the time--which doesn't have an auto cleaning function. And, outdoor photographers tend to change lenses often--so dust goes with the territory.

Glenn
 
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North of Seattle, South of Canada
Mad hatter said:
There's a fellow here that claims he cleaned his D3 with a chopstick and a napkin.

Actually it was a chopstick and a bath tissue. :biggrin: As the saying goes, "necessity is the mother of invention."

The scary thing is what I used for 'cleaning fluid'. :wink:

axle 01 said:
No mate but i am thinking of ordering a kit to try on the d80 first before i go anywhere near the d3s

The D3s is actually easier to clean since both the sensor and sensor well are larger so there is noticeably more room to work. But neither is what I would consider anywhere near difficult or risky. It's the monetary investment that keeps most people from doing it, but once you get your head wrapped around the fact Nikon service can't clean it as often as may be needed, you'll do it. And then you'll see how easy it really is.
 
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Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Messages
12
Location
Santa Clarita, CA
i was just about to clean my sensor but i decided to take more test shots if the dust particle is still there. but my surprise...it was gone! :))) i guess the on board cleaning system in the camera took care of it just by turning on and off. now i can just relax knowing that it's clean for now.
 
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Messages
12
Location
Santa Clarita, CA
for my surprise again, dust went back to the sensor. i just realized that it was just moving around in there. i saw 3 dust particles in there using loupe with led lights. one is pretty big, that's the one i see in my photos. i used the rocket blower first but only removed the big one. so i grabbed my cleaning kit and got rid all of them with no issues at all. it made my day :)
 
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