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Eagle & the blue jay (12 photos)

Discussion in 'Birds' started by Lou Buscher, Apr 1, 2007.

  1. Some people have asked why a small bird will dive and harass the eagle when it is so large and powerful a raptor? Good question and one that really can’t be answered by many people well to do in the world of the eagle. This sequence of photos I am going to post show a blue jay diving continuously at a female eagle in her nest and protecting her youngster from the jay. The only reason I can come up with for this action is the jay has a nest close or somewhere in the eagle’s nest. I photographed this happening back on June 7, 2005 when we went to band the youngster but could not climb the tree due to bees, many, many bees in the dead pine trunk. The tree has fallen since then and the pair has a new nest close by which I will get to visit soon. I photographed these from a distance of about 350 to 400 feet with a D70 and a Sigma 800MM.
    Lou
    1 Mom is catching the movement of the jay not in the picture yet.
    442396083_e6e62f5ded_o.png
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  2. TheBear

    TheBear Guest

    that's some interesting behavior
     
  3. 2 Here comes the jay, right to the left of her
    442396075_3c4c5fad80_o.png
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    3 See him he is now up by the trunk to the left.
    View attachment 87913

    4 the jay passes very close to the eagle, just on the left of her
    View attachment 87914

    5 there he is up at the top again but she has her eye on him
    View attachment 87915

    6 now he is over to the right and above her
    View attachment 87916
     
  4. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    Wow brazen aren't they.
    Good shots of the event Lou.
    Thanks for digging those up:>)))
     
  5. 12 this was pretty much the end of it but I was glad to see it end as the heat was unbearable this day
    442392325_f6592876ae_o.png
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    Thank you for your patience in viewing this long post.
    Lou
     
  6. Thanks Gale you missed the last one.
    Lou
     
  7. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    No, I awlays go back and view for more info or pics:>)) Especially when it come to nature and wild life:>))
    Thank you

    I think the Blue Jay wore himself out.
    The Eagle held her nest and protected that baby
    Good pics.
    Not so easy with 800mm:>))))
    Good job
     
  8. That is a amazing series Lou

    I've never seen such a insistent bird
     
  9. Blue

    Blue Guest

    Love #8 :smile: What's the chain on the left?
     
  10. OK That is good to know Gale and thanks again for the look.
    Lou
     
  11. Gary you won't believe this but in my files I have a Kingbird chaseing an eagle in flight and landing on it's neck, HONEST. I'll see if I can find it. Thanks for the look
    Lou
     
  12. Good eye Blue, that chain is for a teather line, holds a pully used for climbing. It is placed on the first climb and a lite nylon rope is threaded through the pulley and tied off high enough so other people can'd reach it. When we get there to band we have an 8 foot aluminum latter to reach up to the rope and also so the climbers don't puncture the preadatator guard (aluminum flashing placed around the base of the tree). The lite rope is than used to pull a strong nylon line up and is fastened to the climber for safety. Climbers are used on pines only as they will help kill a hardwood. For this condition the climb is done like you would a cliff and once up there the pulley is placed and used on the next climbs to make it a bit eaiser. I'll see if I can post something on it as I have many photos.
    Thanks for the look
    Lou
    www.loubuscher.com
     
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