Critique Elliptical spiral staircase....

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Andy
I really enjoyed this set. The images keep me coming back to them again and again. The ones captured with the fisheye make my head spin (in a good way, if that makes sense) as my brain tries to process the curved lines re-bending with the optics of the lens. And the one from your rectilinear lens has wonderfully rich colors. Very well done.
 

Butlerkid

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Steampunk (y)
Gee! I've never got that comment before! ;)
Critique? Ok, here's my critique: I didn't take them ;)

Just a great set! :)
LOL! Thanks!
......
I doubt if there was any other way to shoot this- unless you had complete access and lighting control.
When I am thinking black and white I really worry about backgrounds, anything with a straight or geometric shape that I do not want in the picture, and anything that is lighted that I do not want accented. Yes, I should think about these things in color as well- but they are usually more glaring after the color goes away.
My two cents
Gary
Thanks for commenting, Gary.
Very nice images. Challenge handled successfully!
Appreciate it, Bobby!
Excellent set. Great use of the fisheye.
I really like that little fisheye. Sometimes it is just the right lens - other times, not so much!
What a fantastic set Karen, masterfully captured. As the others have said 5 is a wall hanger for me.

We spent many weeks in Charleston over the years. The upper stairs were not open then, As someone who understands the craftmanship involved, I truly appreciate the the amazing work. As a builder of unique and complicated stairs, and formed concrete ones popular during the steel and glass architectural style. I kept a set of circular stair books at the ready, hoping to one day work on a simple circular stair. Then computers came along, and such stairs then arrived in a truck. There is often more work in the railings, I once had to hire a craftsman to carve a 16" radius railing descending 2 steps, the marble skirt was also carved in place.
Appreciate the comments! The third floor is still not open to the public. It would have been nice to get a shot showing that the stairs are free standing....
Wow, nothing wrong with this beautiful images.
Everything is perfect.
Well done Karen. 💯
Thanks!
I really enjoyed this set. The images keep me coming back to them again and again. The ones captured with the fisheye make my head spin (in a good way, if that makes sense) as my brain tries to process the curved lines re-bending with the optics of the lens. And the one from your rectilinear lens has wonderfully rich colors. Very well done.
Thanks so much for your comments!
Great photography. Congrats Karen.
Appreciate your looking and commenting, Binnur!
 

Butlerkid

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The steampunk style is not one of the most well known in terms of interior design. ... In essence, this trend is a mixture between elegant Victorian interior accessories and the strength of industrial elements.
Ah.....thanks for the explanation. But not sure it applies here. There is very little metal. Almost all 1800's wood work.....
 
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Virginia Beach, Virginia
"The History of the Nathaniel Russell House

Nathaniel Russell arrived in Charleston from Bristol, Rhode Island in 1765 and, thanks to extensive contacts in his home colony, established himself as a successful merchant and slave trader. His 1789 marriage to Sarah Hopton Russell produced two daughters, Alicia and Sarah, and in 1808 the Russell family moved to their new townhome at 51 Meeting Street. Accompanying them were as many as eighteen enslaved people who toiled in the work yard, gardens, stable and kitchen. Russell spared little expense in the construction of his home, regarded as one of Charleston’s finest in its era with geometrically shaped rooms, elaborate plaster work ornamentation and formal gardens. The defining architectural feature of the home is the stairway whose “…sweep is broad, treads are deep, and the rise perfectly proportioned and easy of ascent,” according to Nathaniel Russell’s great-granddaughter Alicia Hopton Middleton."



On the main floor, there is only about a 8' area from which to photograph the stairway. And, of course, tripods are not allowed. Thus, these were all handheld D850 images. Note the ISO levels...... All processed in Topaz DeNoise AI.

#1 Sigma 15mm fisheye, f8, 1/60th, ISO 9000
View attachment 1673753

#2 Sigma 15mm fisheye, f8, 1/60th, ISO 12,800
View attachment 1673754

#3 Sigma 15mm fisheye, f8, 1/60th, ISO 10,000
View attachment 1673755

#4 Sigma 15mm fisheye, f8, 1/60th, ISO 4,000
View attachment 1673756

#5 Nikon 14-24 @ 15mm, f8, 1/60th, ISO 12,800
View attachment 1673757

#6 Sigma 15mm fisheye, f8, 1/60th, ISO 12,800
View attachment 1673758
I lived in Charleston for a while. While it is a fascinating city, I coul10d not get a job. If you aren't from Charleston then you are not welcome. Only for short time. I have been told this by many locals who are from Charleston. I hope that has changed since I live there in 1996. Other than that. This house must have had 3 or 4 floors to it.
 

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