Explain Raid

Discussion in 'PC/Windows/Linux' started by senna, Jul 23, 2008.

  1. senna

    senna

    Jan 6, 2007
    San Jose Ca.
    I just put a new sytsem together that does support raid,0,1, and 5 or something. I have two 500 gid HD's.

    Is this something I sould conceder?
    This would eliminate my backup so then what? I can put more drives in but I do need to conceder cost.
     
  2. Here's a good description http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redundant_array_of_independent_disks

    In short Raid 0 for your drives would yield one faster 1 TB drive (spread out over your two).

    Raid 1 would give you 500 MB with redundacy... IOW a backup of sorts.

    I live on the edge and have RAID 0 on my system and do backups to external.
    Don
     
  3. senna

    senna

    Jan 6, 2007
    San Jose Ca.
    Thanks Don. So my backup would not need to be equal to the 1TB in my case. 500mb would still be sufficient b/u. And external would be better just to seperate it from the main system correct?

    Would I need to reformat the drives to switch to raid 0?
    Would I have to b/u the drives first?
     
  4. When you change from one RAID type to another you have to destroy the existing volumes - so YES - back up everything before you start converting your drives into RAIDs.

    There are some utilities that hardware manufacturers supply for their own RAID controllers (server not PC) - and these will convert from one RAID type to another - but they are incredibly slow and I would still back up fully before starting.

    Its your data, you put a price on it, you evaluate the risk. Me - I'm a belt and braces guy with data - 2 backups, 1 held offsite before I start playing with disks.
     
  5. stayathomedad

    stayathomedad

    Mar 11, 2008
    Alaska
    Please oh please don't do raid 0... Too much risk for so little reward!

    I fail to understand why anyone would bother with raid 0... It makes so little sense!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_RAID_levels#RAID_0_failure_rate

    Raid 1 is a mirror.... It's only a backup in the sense that it gives you greater protection against physical disk failure... If one of the disks dies, then the other disk has an exact copy/mirror of the data... It is not a back up in the sense that you are protected against human error, fire, viruses, theft, and so forth... FOR EXAMPLE - if you delete a file, the file will be deleted from both hard drives... meaning you cannot go to the second disk and recover the file in a typical backup setup.

    If you only need 500GB then just use one of the disks as normal and use the other disk in an external hard drive enclosure in a typical/traditional backup setup...

    And please please please stay away from raid 0... so silly to even mess with it in this day and age...
     
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  7. stayathomedad

    stayathomedad

    Mar 11, 2008
    Alaska
    9.75 is a bigger number then 5... click the link to see what I mean...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_RAID_levels#RAID_0_failure_rate

    9.75!
     
  8. Pete

    Pete

    Jun 10, 2006
    Denver, CO
    Another option with your second HD would be to get a slide in drawer or USB case for one. That way you can do your backup and remove the drive from your computer completely. Even if you do Raid 1, you still need to do regular bakups.
    Pete
     
  9. Raid 0 helped me upgrade my 4 year old system so that I could wait for vista and all the other tech upgrades to settle down until I decide what to get next. I have one external HD with a complete image, I do an image backup every two weeks, so if anything happens I just reformat and install the image. I then have two other external HD's which mirrow eachother with the catalog of images. The speed of the raid 0 certainly has kept me going running CS3 and NX just fine. Even when I buy my new system, I will back up the same way.

    Nancy
     
  10. senna

    senna

    Jan 6, 2007
    San Jose Ca.
    Thatnks for all the input everyone.
    I guess for now there is no real benifit to trying raid.
    I would be better served getting my b/u in order.:smile:
     
  11. I highly recommend using this D-link NAS enclosure:
    http://www.mwave.com/mwave/Skusearch.hmx?scriteria=3989315

    Takes 2 minutes to slide in 2 drives and then I configured it as RAID 1 (it's also a NAS so it's accessible by any computer on your network directly for file sharing or backup).

    I save my original files to an external drive, run 1 back up to another external drive and ANOTHER back up to the RAID 1. So I have 4 copies of my images. I know, paranoid but I sleep well at night not worrying.
     
  12. senna

    senna

    Jan 6, 2007
    San Jose Ca.
    But can you find your car keys?:eek: :biggrin:

    Thanks for the advise Joe, I will probably get an external b/u.
     
  13. Troy,

    If you really want backup and you do not require more than 500gb, why not consider operating your two EHDs in a mirror mode with incremental backup? After the first full backup your sequential backups will be rapid and reliable and you will have redundancy. This is important with hard drives as it is only a matter of time before they fail.

    Please do not take my word for this because I am not a computer geek. However, I spent a whole lot of time researching how to backup my system and I am doing exactly as I shared above. I am using eSata. If you have an eSata port, you can get a card for your computer to up your speed to eSATA for about $40 to $50. My backup is so fast now that I quit doing it automatically and I now do it manually after a working session.

    Regards,
    Tom
     
  14. senna

    senna

    Jan 6, 2007
    San Jose Ca.
    How does this differ from Raid 1 (two identical drives, right?) I like the idea of using the two drive in this way too make the most sence. It will take me for ever to fill these.

    I pretty sure my m/b has a esata and even one other besides sata. I need to find out more about this.
     
  15. Since we're getting into backup approaches, here's what I do. I use SyncBackSE which is a terrific piece of software. It is very powerful yet easy to get started with on a basic level. I run a back-up Job 1 from Drive A to Drive B. I also have a back-up Job 2 from Drive B to Drive C (which is RAID 1 so it's really 2 copies). I have these run as a group automatically every night @ 5:30 am so once it runs I have 4 copies of my photos.

    I use the fast backup option which keeps a log of all files copied and only copies new files (basically incremental except it's not a backup file which tends to be compressed and/or proprietary) it's just a complete copy of the entire folder and file structure so it only adds new files. I can look at my back up photos simply by viewing the folder.

    BTW, I also run a full system image every day @ 6 am using a really great piece of software, Shadow Protect. I run a full backup every Sunday and incrementals every Mon-Saturday. This means on any day of the week I can either restore my entire system to a prior day (the previous Sunday being the oldest date). Better yet, I can MOUNT a virtual drive of my entire system (takes a few seconds to complete this and it appears as a drive letter on the current system) and recover select files.

    Example: on Monday I create a word document on Wednesday I accidentally save over the word document so it's gone. I can mount Monday's system and copy that older word doc to my current system. Shadow Protect is not exactly well known but I'm pretty sure they license their core technology to Acronis True Image and others disk image vendors so they know what they're doing and do it well. They also state that they save their best imaging tech for their own products. :smile:
     
  16. Troy,

    In answer to your question, i think the setup I am using is a simple RAID, and I used to know the associated number, but this got mixed up in the "alzheimer bucket."
    I can only tell you that this is simple and wonderful and easy to troubleshoot and just about as reliable as it can get. The software gives me everything that Joe mentioned including a preview of what will be backed up each time if I choose to look at this(it is an option).
    Troy this is simple and wonderful and I know this because it has to be simple or simple me could not get this to work! I try to do photography and not computers, but I can and do do this backup stuff to protect my photos.

    Regards,
    Tom
     
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