Film Choices?

Joined
Jul 29, 2009
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447
Location
Tulsa Oklahoma
Okay, so I think I'm going to try to shoot 1 roll of film per week. I don't want to limit myself to b&w or color. I want to try different options, different ISOs.

So what are your go to options for color and b&w and why?

Thanks in Advance! :eek:
 
Joined
Oct 20, 2009
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Alabama
my go to now a days for color is Portra 400 renders skin tones very nice,as for B&W Im on a Retros 80s kick right now because of the tones I get with the soup Im using
 
Joined
Jun 14, 2008
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9,867
Location
Florida
Well since you want to shoot 1 roll per week. You can cover a great part of the field of available films and see what you like. I personally like the Fuji consumer films SuperiaX in 200 and 400 ASA. Great colors. Portra gives wonderful realistic colors especially of skin tones but I've found it does a wonderful job on flowers too. Portra 160, 400 and 800 are all super. Kodak Gold 400 has been a "go to" film for many many years.

I'd suggest you purchase a bunch of the popular films and run through a few rolls of each. Then decide what fits your style and taste.
 
Joined
Mar 31, 2007
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Thornhill, Ontario, a suburb of Toronto
If you'd really like to try working without a net, get some slide film. Fuji 50 or 100 ISO colour slide are wonderful films. You'll have to take more care with your exposures than you would with colour print stock but the results are wonderful when projected.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Messages
35,259
Location
Arizona
Real Name
Chris
My favorites are:

Slow B&W: About the only one left is PanF. It's ok, not great. Pull it for a longer toe. My fave used to be Efke 25.. If you can find any, buy it!

Medium B&W: Trix. Possibly the most versatile film ever. You can shoot it from ISO 200 to 1600.

Fast B&W: Delta 3200. This film is mean fast. Some will tell you the "real" speed of this film is 1250. So what. It works well at box speed or at 1600, where it looks better then pushed trix.

Slow color: Since I gave up slide film with the demise of Kodachrome 25, the best slow color film is Ektar 100 negative film. I still have a stash of some Ektachrome, but it'll take a really cool project to get me to shoot it! Alternatively, give Portra 160 a shot. It's not really slow, but it's slower than most color emulsions.

Medium color film: Portra 400. My favorite color film. The colors SOOC are fantastic, and the grain is as good as any b&w film. Shoot it in daylight, or use an 80B filter under tungsten bulbs.

Fast color film: Portra 800. This is a completely different film than its slower Portra cousins. It's very contrasty, prefers yellow light and is grainy! A good film for handheld action/street.

Just shoot it film: whatever Kodak 200 or 400 film is available in the nearest drug or grocery store. Since you will most likely be scanning these films, they will be just fine. Shoot first, then worry about the emulsion later!
 
Joined
Aug 23, 2007
Messages
5,742
Location
El Cajon, CA
My favorites are:

Slow B&W: About the only one left is PanF. It's ok, not great. Pull it for a longer toe. My fave used to be Efke 25.. If you can find any, buy it!

Medium B&W: Trix. Possibly the most versatile film ever. You can shoot it from ISO 200 to 1600.

Fast B&W: Delta 3200. This film is mean fast. Some will tell you the "real" speed of this film is 1250. So what. It works well at box speed or at 1600, where it looks better then pushed trix.

Slow color: Since I gave up slide film with the demise of Kodachrome 25, the best slow color film is Ektar 100 negative film. I still have a stash of some Ektachrome, but it'll take a really cool project to get me to shoot it! Alternatively, give Portra 160 a shot. It's not really slow, but it's slower than most color emulsions.

Medium color film: Portra 400. My favorite color film. The colors SOOC are fantastic, and the grain is as good as any b&w film. Shoot it in daylight, or use an 80B filter under tungsten bulbs.

Fast color film: Portra 800. This is a completely different film than its slower Portra cousins. It's very contrasty, prefers yellow light and is grainy! A good film for handheld action/street.

Just shoot it film: whatever Kodak 200 or 400 film is available in the nearest drug or grocery store. Since you will most likely be scanning these films, they will be just fine. Shoot first, then worry about the emulsion later!
I still have a few rolls of Efke25 in 120, about half of a 100ft bulk roll of 35mm. It's a really great, just sorry I didn't buy a few more bulk rolls when I had the chance. :frown:

I also have some Ektar 25 in 120, I haven't shot too much of it, but I have to agree that the Ektar 100 is about the best for slow speed. I've been using more Portra 400, rally like it, even more than the 800.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Messages
35,259
Location
Arizona
Real Name
Chris
I still have a few rolls of Efke25 in 120, about half of a 100ft bulk roll of 35mm. It's a really great, just sorry I didn't buy a few more bulk rolls when I had the chance. :frown:

I also have some Ektar 25 in 120, I haven't shot too much of it, but I have to agree that the Ektar 100 is about the best for slow speed. I've been using more Portra 400, rally like it, even more than the 800.
The Portra 400 and 800 seem to be completely different films. 400 has pretty punchy colors (it's closer to the old VC) while the 800 is subdued color with higher contrast (like a contrasty NC.)

And yeah, I've got a couple rolls of Efke 25 and some IR820 as well in the fridge.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Messages
35,259
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Arizona
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Chris
I forgot about the IR820. I have a few rolls of it in 120 and about 8 rolls of 35mm on ice.
The film is painfully slow. The closest thing I've used for IR in the last year or so, is SFX. Still not as fast as good old HIE, but much faster than Aura (IR820). And not very sensitive to anything longer than about 800 nanometers.

I hypered a couple rolls of Aura with mercury vapor (put it in an airtight glass jar with a pool of mercury on the bottom, then held at for a week at 40C.) After that, it seemed to work at iso 50-ish. No great shakes but better than the 12 or so it shoots at without hypering.

Do not try this at home. I did all the mercury steps in a chemistry laboratory, using professional equipment, then disposed of the developing chemistry into a heavy metal waste container.
 
Joined
Aug 23, 2007
Messages
5,742
Location
El Cajon, CA
The film is painfully slow. The closest thing I've used for IR in the last year or so, is SFX. Still not as fast as good old HIE, but much faster than Aura (IR820). And not very sensitive to anything longer than about 800 nanometers.

I hypered a couple rolls of Aura with mercury vapor (put it in an airtight glass jar with a pool of mercury on the bottom, then held at for a week at 40C.) After that, it seemed to work at iso 50-ish. No great shakes but better than the 12 or so it shoots at without hypering.

Do not try this at home. I did all the mercury steps in a chemistry laboratory, using professional equipment, then disposed of the developing chemistry into a heavy metal waste container.
I got my best results when shooting it at ISO3. I used the M2, at least I could use the rangefinder to focus and compose. I can't imaging using that stuff in an SLR.

m
 

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