Film scanners?

Discussion in 'Film Forum' started by BarryS, Aug 28, 2008.

  1. BarryS

    BarryS

    666
    Dec 12, 2006
    Narberth, PA
    With my two recent(past 6 months) of a n75 and a n8008s i have been shooting more film and i am thinking about purchasing a film scanner. Can anyone recommend one that is good but also a reasonable price. I am willing however to pay more for one if the cheaper ones just don't meassure up. Basically i have no info on this since i really started my photographic life with digital not with film. Thanks in advance.

    Also if i should just basically buy the COOLSCAN V ED just let me know cause i kind of want an excuse to own one of them :smile:
     
  2. Chris101

    Chris101

    Feb 2, 2005
    Arizona
    No, not the Coolscan V ED, but the Coolscan 5000 ED. Search back in this forum for a set of tests on scanners, and you will see that the V is only a small step above most inexpensive flatbeds, but the 5000 is well above that level for resolution and sharpness. That will translate into enlargability.

    If you are looking for a decent flatbed that does an adequate job of 35mm (as well as larger formats) look at the offerings by Epson and Microtek. Epson's software is better, and Microtek's film holders are better. Many people prefer third party software and anti-newton ring glass as work-arounds for both of those issues.
     
  3. mhcfires

    mhcfires

    Aug 23, 2007
    El Cajon, CA
    I have been using a Dimage ScanDual IV for my 35mm stuff. Unfortunately, Minolta is not supporting it any more. If I could do it over again, I would have a Nikon 5000 ED. What I'm using is ok, but I wish I had the Nikon. :frown:
     
  4. BarryS

    BarryS

    666
    Dec 12, 2006
    Narberth, PA
    Ugh 1200 thats not fun :(
     
  5. You can pick up an Epson V500 for about $150. See my "Eyes Have It" post for an example done with a V500. PS - this was a heavily cropped image.
     
  6. cotdt

    cotdt

    Jul 14, 2007
    Bay Area, USA
    I agree with Chris101's suggestion :)
     
  7. snegron

    snegron

    983
    Jul 29, 2007
    SW Florida
    I have an Epson 4870 Pro flatbed that I have been unhappy with for several years now. If I could start over again I would have waited and spent more on a film dedicated scanner, not a flatbed.
     
  8. arela

    arela

    480
    Jan 15, 2008
    Norway
    As far as I can see in the user's maual (they share the same), they are almost identical.
    Same Aperture/Scan range. Same image sensor and optical resolution.

    Besides scaning time, size and optional equipement, I cant see any difference between the two.
     
  9. Chris101

    Chris101

    Feb 2, 2005
    Arizona
    The quality of the scan is different.

    Here's some reading:
    https://www.nikoncafe.com/vforums/showthread.php?t=144813
    https://www.nikoncafe.com/vforums/showthread.php?t=145597
    https://www.nikoncafe.com/vforums/showthread.php?t=146433
    https://www.nikoncafe.com/vforums/showthread.php?t=147023

    It's kinda choppy, but you should be ble to dig it out.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 15, 2017
  10. arela

    arela

    480
    Jan 15, 2008
    Norway
    I think iread most of this before, before my Coolscan V ED arrived late spring.
    My user manual, witch cover Super Coolscan 5000ED and Coolscan V ED,
    shows similar tech data.
    But as you point out Chris, the quality might be different although, even its hard to understand!
     
  11. Chris101

    Chris101

    Feb 2, 2005
    Arizona
    I'm sure the CSV is a step or three above a flatbed, and many get by with those. How do you like the scans you get from it? (Which, after all is what counts.)
     
  12. Butlerkid

    Butlerkid Cafe Ambassador Moderator

    Apr 8, 2008
    Rutledge, Tennessee
    Karen
    Years ago I bought the Coolscan 4000 ED when it first came out as it offered firewire connections. Excellent scanner! Still working great! I highly recommend the newer 5000 ED.

    Note: now that firewire 800 is becoming more available check to see if that is available and if your computer could handle it.