Fin Whale Rising

Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
4,352
Location
CT USA
A few nights ago, I agreed to let a friend interview me for her local cable access show. I found out that she used to be a judge for juried photo competitions. While looking through some of my whale photos, she came across the following one and said it is a prize winner....
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

Now, where is the nearest contest????........
 
Joined
Jan 26, 2005
Messages
978
Location
Viera Fl
Seems all I can say today is

WOWOWOWOWOWOWOWOWOW


Next thing im going to say is moderator take all my pics offffff here. they are not good enough. :<((((

God I wish I could shoot like you guys.

Going to my corner now.

Thanks for sharing
Great Job

Gale
 
Joined
Jan 25, 2005
Messages
994
Location
Alabama
Definitely a winner. Incredible colors. I thought they were all blue, grey and black.... :?

Regards,

Frank
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
4,352
Location
CT USA
Gale,
Leave them up. Much of what you see here has to do with talent, experience and luck. This shot was more luck. Being there is required, but this is a 1 in 50 boat trip shots, even then, if I had been looking in the opposite direction, I would have missed it. (The Naturalist didn't even see her until I had 3 shots off, and this shot was long past!)
Frank,
Coloration varies. The fin whales are all dark on the left side, lighter and mottled on the right. It is thought that the coloration of the right side helps corral fish and other food. The green is really white, tinted green by the nutrients in the water.
Thanks for the comments!
 
C

celia bule

Guest
Just beautiful, your photo. You can try photos-of-the-year contest. They have special galleries to Nikon and Canon users and you can always submit a photo. These galleries don't have a particular theme.
I feel like the rest of the posters here: your photo is a winner
 
Joined
Jan 26, 2005
Messages
2,296
Location
Ohio & Florida
A really great photo!!

It is my understanding that many ocean critters are counter-shaded, that is dark on top and white below so that they look dark like the bottom to things above them and light like the surface to things below them. This is a plus for both the hunter and the hunted.
The fin whales were a bit of a mystery with the white on the right side until they noted that when hunting they rolled on the side with the right side down. Given their size they are rarely the hunted, they still need the counter-shading only when hunting.
All this is from memory, source obscure.
Bob
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
4,352
Location
CT USA
Thanks Bob,
There are several reasons that fin whales were not hunted extensively, the predominent one is their speed. The nickname greyhound of the seas applies, as when motivated they can make over 30 knots. Not many modern whaling vessels, if any, can match that, let alone the older boats. Their size (second only to the blue whale) doesn't really enter in to it, as blues were hunted almost to extinction. I've seen them use their chevron coloring on the right side to herd and corral fish by swimming in a clockwise circle, ever tighter, then diving, reversing direction (using the plain, dark side for camo) and coming into the middle of the school to feed. Nature usually gives all the critters the resources necessary and the smarts to use them. The only exception to the last part seems to be some of us humans.....
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
4,352
Location
CT USA
Thanks, all. It was a rare shot on a rare, calm day. No debating on how to make it better, it's nature and as good as it gets.
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2005
Messages
4,352
Location
CT USA
Thanks. During the season, I try to get out every weekend, weather permitting, but it is still up to nature as to what the conditions will be and what the whales will be doing and where. I saw this one coming, mostly because I happened to be looking in that direction and saw the tell-tale green glow in the water getting brighter. I've missed more opportunities than I've captured, but that's the way it goes. It's tough when you can't see them coming, nothing technology has can predict where or when they will surface. We do know they will have to come up eventually to breathe, but with dive times over 30 minutes, these fin whales could be 15 miles away in any direction!
 
Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Nikon Cafe is a fan site and not associated with Nikon Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2005-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom