Fisheye - driving myself insane.....

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Apr 21, 2007
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Thanks again Brian

Yes, I use the 10.5mm on flowers quite a bit:
It looks like a truly fun lens to work with. :smile: & I see no issues with softness in any of your shots. All these make me feel a lot better about spending the money on a Fisheye as I see far more things I can do with it & then the expense seems less of a concern. Though my nephew having fun is the most important part to me.

Thanks again

Lil
 
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May 26, 2006
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Charlottesville, VA / Palo Alto, CA
I still don't understand which is the difference. Fisheye, DX or FF means a 180° / 120° angle of view. I really can't link it correctly with focal lenghts, nor understand which kind of utility has the Tokina 10-17 fisheye zoom. I'm neither sure Lil got it completely.
Which is the REAL, practical difference between a 8mm, 10.5, 16, or 10-17?
The 8mm (Sigma or the 8/f2.8 Nikkor AIS) is a circular fisheye. It produces a round image about 23mm in diameter on 35mm film. Its FOV is 180 degrees in a circle, meaning in all directions. Since the image is really a circle, everything outside the image circle is black on the slide. On a DX with a 23x15 sensor, you get this cropped, so it looks a bit odd. AndyE posted a few from the 8/f2.8 a while back.

The 10.5mm on DX, or the 16/f2.8 on 35mm are rectangular fisheyes. They have a FOV of 180 diagonally, something like 160 horizontally and about 140 vertically (but don't quote me on those last two). They fill the entire frame of their respective formats, leaving no black corners.

The 16/f2.8 yields the center of a rectangular fisheye on DX. I'd estimate that the FOV is around 95 degrees diagonally - that is, much less than the Sigma 10-20 does.

The Tokina 10-17 zoom yields a rectangular fisheye with 180 diagonal coverage at 10mm, and a mild "cropped like" fisheye at 17mm.

In all of these, any straight line that does not go through the exact center of the frame becomes curved, and more curved the further from the center. It's barrel distortion gone wild.

The Sigma 10-20, by comparison, tries to maintain straight lines as straight, no matter where they are. It does a reasonable job of that, but if you really want no distortion in a superwide lens, the one you want is the Sigma 12-24, which has functionally invisible distortion even at 12mm and even on 36x24.
 
Joined
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Thanks for the reference Brian

What I HAVE experienced is that about 30% of the time, Nikon Capture produces truly BAD results in the corners when one DEFISHES one of these images. I have not tried Capture NX, and some have told me that it does this better. Bjorn Rorslett says that PTlens also is more reliable. I do not defish much so I cannot comment on either of those options. But I did a fair amount of defishing when I got the lens while I was learning how to use it. The bad defished corners didn't take a critical eye to detect...
I've downloaded PTLens in case I'll need it. Thanks for all this information.

Lil:smile:
 
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The 8mm (Sigma or the 8/f2.8 Nikkor AIS) is a circular fisheye. It produces a round image about 23mm in diameter on 35mm film. Its FOV is 180 degrees in a circle, meaning in all directions. Since the image is really a circle, everything outside the image circle is black on the slide. On a DX with a 23x15 sensor, you get this cropped, so it looks a bit odd. AndyE posted a few from the 8/f2.8 a while back.

The 10.5mm on DX, or the 16/f2.8 on 35mm are rectangular fisheyes. They have a FOV of 180 diagonally, something like 160 horizontally and about 140 vertically (but don't quote me on those last two). They fill the entire frame of their respective formats, leaving no black corners.

The 16/f2.8 yields the center of a rectangular fisheye on DX. I'd estimate that the FOV is around 95 degrees diagonally - that is, much less than the Sigma 10-20 does.

The Tokina 10-17 zoom yields a rectangular fisheye with 180 diagonal coverage at 10mm, and a mild "cropped like" fisheye at 17mm.

In all of these, any straight line that does not go through the exact center of the frame becomes curved, and more curved the further from the center. It's barrel distortion gone wild.

The Sigma 10-20, by comparison, tries to maintain straight lines as straight, no matter where they are. It does a reasonable job of that, but if you really want no distortion in a superwide lens, the one you want is the Sigma 12-24, which has functionally invisible distortion even at 12mm and even on 36x24.

Ok, NOW I got the point about the difference between CIRCULAR and RECTILINEAR fisheye.. while the former is completely a world aside, 180° in all directions, the latter is a variant of wide angles with only one FOV of 180° and the rest depending on focal lenght, plus the fact about curvilinear lines.
I mean, since everyone of those lens has AT LEAST a 180° FOV, I couldn't really understand how could focal lenght matter. Thanks.
 
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Apr 21, 2007
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OK Edward, in between you, Brian & Cheryle (I hope the spelling's right) I've decided that I'm sure my nephew & I will have tons of fun with the 10,5mm. I'd like to see the 10-17mm & see what it can do, but I really know I'll have fun with my nephew with the fisheye.

Thanks for the great help with all these great shots.

Lil
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2007
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God's Creation
Lil...
One other thing I would like to mention...(Edward reminded me of it)
when you shoot for fisheye effect you get verrrrry close to the object
when shooting. There is no protection on the lens, so you need to be careful
that you don't touch it on anything, thus a possibility of a scratch. The glass
itself is actually rounded, so no adding a filter...

When out in a field of sunflowers or next to trees or something straight, I love
the way it bends the scene. I took some flowering bushes one day, and, as
the lens is also wide, what was next to the bush in the yard ended up on the
"side" of the picture...love it, so much creative expression!!!
This lens is such a toy...but I get to explore and experience in a completely new way.
It is quite different from a normal picture that turns out pretty much the way you stand
and view what you wanted to capture.
Hope you will like it too... :smile: :smile: :smile:
 
Joined
Feb 21, 2007
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73
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Arcadia, CA
Alright, since this thread is so relevant to my question..

Nikon 10.5 or Tokina 10-17? Both are about the same price from last time I checked, so is it better to go w/ the Tokina because of the range?
 
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