Flaming Daisy

Discussion in 'Macro, Flowers, Insects, and Greenery' started by viewfinder, Jun 19, 2005.

  1. Shallow DOF provided the following effect, kind of like the flame from a gas stove:

    [​IMG]
    Flash used : No
    Exposure time: 0.033 s (1/30)
    Aperture : f/4.8
    Whitebalance : Manual (Shade -2)
    Metering Mode: spot


    This one is getting ready to close up for the day:

    [​IMG]
    Flash used : No
    Exposure time: 0.0100 s (1/100)
    Aperture : f/3.3
    Whitebalance : Manual (Shade -2)
    Metering Mode: spot


    This one is a little past its prime:

    [​IMG]
    Flash used : No
    Exposure time: 0.0100 s (1/100)
    Aperture : f/3.5
    Whitebalance : Manual (Shade -2)
    Metering Mode: spot


    And the next generation:

    [​IMG]
    Flash used : No
    Exposure time: 0.0080 s (1/125)
    Aperture : f/3.8
    Whitebalance : Manual (Shade -2)
    Metering Mode: spot


    All taken using D70 and 105mm micro.

    Comments and critiques most welcome.

    Regards,
    Jonathan
     
  2. The like them in that order 3-1-2-4. I like #3 because of the curly leaves.
     
  3. very nice work. that is a superb lens for these shots
     
  4. Reds and oranges are hard to do, but you've made them look simple here. I enjoyed your artful compositions, color and DOF.

    Virginia
    aka beaucamera
     
  5. Jonathon,

    Very creative color control and compostion. I like these very much.
     
  6. Beautiful shots, Jonathan! #2 is my least fave and I can't decide between #1 and #3 for my fave. Very nice!
     
  7. Thank Virginia for the complements.

    As for the orange, I think the shade WB and spot metering helped, and there were no direct lighting. I just press the shutter release, the rest were done by the D70...

    Regards,
    Jonathan
     
  8. Thanks Gilles, Dave, Virginia, Mark and Kevin for your comments.

    I quite enjoyed using the 105mm, particularly the DOF and bokeh at the wider end of the aperture. I use it for candid portrait too, though the extra working distance can be a blessing and a disadvantage. Nonetheless a very nice piece(s?) of glass.

    Regards,
    Jonathan