For anyone who hates their cable provider as much as I hate mine

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My understanding is that using that method is illegal (though I've never heard of it being tested in court) or at least violates the terms of agreement that prevents viewing a blacked out broadcast. So, the Drinking Support Team will be spared the trouble of having to help me out. :ROFLMAO:
What's the purpose of blacking out the local market?

Surely the sports team can't expect local fans to attend every single home game in person (and even if they did, what about away games?). All it does is force fans in to a TV package that contains a bunch of garbage they're forced to pay for but have no interest in using/watching.

I don't subscribe to that methodology. I pay for VPN, and I pay for the season ticket package to watch my home team. I'm not bootlegging, stealing someone else's cable, or illegally streaming the game. I'm still paying money to watch it, I'm just not paying it to an antiquated cable company that refuses to adapt to the changing times.
 
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What's the purpose of blacking out the local market?
The regular season games of the Baltimore Orioles and the Washington Nationals are broadcast by MASN. MASN is owned 90% by the Orioles and 10% by the Nationals. MASN broadcasts are distributed in my area through four companies. The 90% owner of MASN apparently wants to protect the revenue stream from those companies by blacking out other viewing sources. Note that none of that has anything to do with "an antiquated cable company that refuses to adopt to the changing times," though that for me is only a point of interest, not substance.

We all make choices in life. I would intentionally run a red light if doing so would get someone in a dire situation to the hospital quicker. I won't use a VPN to trick the system that has blacked out a local game.
 
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A few observations about PBS.

First, the issue with getting live streamed PBS is that each PBS station is independently owned and operated so any streaming service will need to make individual deals with each of over 300 PBS affiliates.

Second, the PBS app gives you access to most (but not all) PBS offerings the day after they are broadcast at the earliest. This is not a real issue for me except for the PBS Newshour.... concerning which...

The PBS Newshour IS live streamed on YouTube (not YouTube TV).
 
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Wow, a lot of misinformation in this thread. If anyone has a question about their cable provider, how pricing and discounts work, tv services, internet packages/speeds, etc., feel free to reach out and i'll give you the honest answer and not the fluff most people hear (and the mass amounts of incorrect information people hear).

Also, there is nothing illegal about a VPN. All a VPN is a virtual private network between you and another computer in some other location. You set up a connection to another location (most VPN tools give you the option of where you'd like to connect to) and once you're connected your traffic is then routed through that computer as if you're local to them. It still goes through your ISP (internet provider) but it's encrypted so they don't know what type of traffic it is. VPN's are used all over the world. (i'm connected to one right now for work).
 
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My understanding is that using that method is illegal (though I've never heard of it being tested in court) or at least violates the terms of agreement that prevents viewing a blacked out broadcast. So, the Drinking Support Team will be spared the trouble of having to help me out. :ROFLMAO:
We will proceed with the operation as planned and write it off as training.

Regarding accessing blacked-out sports broadcasts, this is (as you note in another reply to this thread below) a matter each person has to decide.
 
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Wow, a lot of misinformation in this thread. If anyone has a question about their cable provider, how pricing and discounts work, tv services, internet packages/speeds, etc., feel free to reach out and i'll give you the honest answer and not the fluff most people hear (and the mass amounts of incorrect information people hear).

Also, there is nothing illegal about a VPN. All a VPN is a virtual private network between you and another computer in some other location. You set up a connection to another location (most VPN tools give you the option of where you'd like to connect to) and once you're connected your traffic is then routed through that computer as if you're local to them. It still goes through your ISP (internet provider) but it's encrypted so they don't know what type of traffic it is. VPN's are used all over the world. (i'm connected to one right now for work).
VPN's are, of course, perfectly legal. But they can be used for illegal activities which is, I think, the question at hand.
 
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Sure, it's just a misunderstanding of the product, which is my point. VPN's are illegal but you can do illegal things with them. Just like cars aren't illegal to use/drive but you can use them for trafficking something illegal.
 
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VPN's are, of course, perfectly legal. But they can be used for illegal activities which is, I think, the question at hand.
I'm still confused as to what is illegal.

Is it illegal for me to pay for a VPN service and pay for NHL Center Ice so that I can watch my home town hockey team, simply because the TV service provider I've selected doesn't carry the local sports channel that would allow me to watch my hockey team?

Then again, I engage in "illegal" activities multiple times a day. The speed limits on certain roads I take to and from work are artificially low.
 
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I'm still confused as to what is illegal.

Is it illegal for me to pay for a VPN service and pay for NHL Center Ice so that I can watch my home town hockey team, simply because the TV service provider I've selected doesn't carry the local sports channel that would allow me to watch my hockey team?
I am not a lawyer and I never played one on TV. I do not know what is legal and what is not. I was just clarifying that, while a VPN is simply a (legal) technology tool, any tool can be used for illegal purposes.

There is, of course, the moral/ethical question which is what I think Mike was getting at.
 
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I'm not a lawyer, but my guess is that using a VPN to trick the system into "thinking" you are in a different area than you are actually in might be analogous to a similar situation regarding the use of airline tickets. It's sometimes possible to buy a ticket for a plane going to Cities A and B less expensively than buying a ticket to go only to City A. So, some people buy the ticket to Cities A and B, get off the airplane at City A and never proceed to City B. The airlines pretty clearly state that that is a violation of the use of their airline system. Similary, it's possible to use a VPN to make the technology think you are watching a Major League Baseball (MLB) game from a location you never intend to be. I've read that doing so is a violation of MLB rules and that violating them gives MLB.com the right to end you subscription with them.

This is my last post on the subject.
 
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I'm not a lawyer, but my guess is that using a VPN to trick the system into "thinking" you are in a different area than you are actually in might be analogous to a similar situation regarding the use of airline tickets. It's sometimes possible to buy a ticket for a plane going to Cities A and B less expensively than buying a ticket to go only to City A. So, some people buy the ticket to Cities A and B, get off the airplane at City A and never proceed to City B. The airlines pretty clearly state that that is a violation of the use of their airline system. Similary, it's possible to use a VPN to make the technology think you are watching a Major League Baseball (MLB) game from a location you never intend to be. I've read that doing so is a violation of MLB rules and that violating gives them the right to end you subscription to MLB.com.

This is my last post on the subject.
That's why you tell the airline that you got "sick" during your layover in City A, and therefore could not make the connecting flight to City B

;)👍
 
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Those are two completely different cases, with one being absolutely illegal to do and the other likely so grey area that nothing will ever come of it.

Using a VPN to watch sports outside your local broadcast area, i'm 99.99999999% will not get you into any hot water whatsoever. There is no true way to know what you're using a VPN for unless your VPN provider gives up that info and even if they did, they're going to go after any of the people who do the illegal activities vs. ones who may be skirting some rules. I even hesitate to put it that way because again, that's what a VPN does and VPNs by themselves are completely legal. I'll just close by saying this is truly a non-issue.
 
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Is that different from the local NBC, CBS, ABC, and Fox affiliates?
Yes. The national broadcast networks have "national" content that can be paid for and streamed everywhere. Local PBS affiliates pick and choose what to broadcast. That's the way I understand it anyway. As noted above, some affiliates have cut deals with YouTube TV (and maybe other "streamers").
 
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I never consider that criterion when deciding whether or not to do something; that data point, even if accurate, is entirely useless to me. It's just my way and perhaps only my way of looking at things.
The old question of why you "do the right thing".... because it IS the right thing or for fear of punishment? As you note (correctly IMHO) this is an individual choice.

When I worked in the IT world, several clever colleagues had cracked the encryption for copy-protected movies. This was a fairly rare accomplishment at the time but soon became commonplace with both free and "commercial" programs available to enable copying. With the advent of digital content, it did not take long for pretty much every movie and music album to become available for free. The various "torrent" sites were an example. On several discussion fora (much like the Cafe) I was the odd man out. I pointed out that taking something that belonged to others was stealing. This was not a popular point of view. The rationalizations offered there remain common today. The greedy (fill in the blank) company made me do it. It is just a computer file (as if that relative intangibility makes it OK). Who elected you internet sheriff? Etc.

I am not claiming that anyone here is breaking the law (although that MAY be the case). I also agree that the chances of getting caught and/or suffering some penalty or punishment approaches zero. But, for me (and speaking only for me) that's not the point. I drive at the speed limit because it is the law and it is the responsible thing to do. And I hope and pray that others do for the sake of my grand children.
 
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The old question of why you "do the right thing".... because it IS the right thing or for fear of punishment? As you note (correctly IMHO) this is an individual choice.

When I worked in the IT world, several clever colleagues had cracked the encryption for copy-protected movies. This was a fairly rare accomplishment at the time but soon became commonplace with both free and "commercial" programs available to enable copying. With the advent of digital content, it did not take long for pretty much every movie and music album to become available for free. The various "torrent" sites were an example. On several discussion fora (much like the Cafe) I was the odd man out. I pointed out that taking something that belonged to others was stealing. This was not a popular point of view. The rationalizations offered there remain common today. The greedy (fill in the blank) company made me do it. It is just a computer file (as if that relative intangibility makes it OK). Who elected you internet sheriff? Etc.

I am not claiming that anyone here is breaking the law (although that MAY be the case). I also agree that the chances of getting caught and/or suffering some penalty or punishment approaches zero. But, for me (and speaking only for me) that's not the point. I drive at the speed limit because it is the law and it is the responsible thing to do. And I hope and pray that others do for the sake of my grand children.
Who in here has stated that they aren't paying for the content being watched, whether it be through a local sports channel, or through a league season pass subscription?

Not paying for content is pirating, which is illegal. I haven't seen anyone here saying that they aren't paying for the content they're watching.
 
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