Glow in the dark

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Its that time of year when the Ghost Fungi are out

A couple from this evening

Omphalotus nidiformis aka Ghost Fungi

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#2
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Beautiful, wish we had them here. Are they edible? I looked them up, they grow in North America. So far, every reference I've found mentions the Appalachian Mountains, North Carolina West Virginia as being places to find them.
 
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Joined
Nov 14, 2005
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Winter Haven, florida
These are amazing.
I assume you lite this with a blacklight or something?
I have a geiger counter if you need one- I would not even get close to some glowing odd looking plant. With my luck they would be carnivorous.
I watched too many old horror movies as a kid- the slime monsters always glowed.
gary
 
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These are amazing.
I assume you lite this with a blacklight or something?
I have a geiger counter if you need one- I would not even get close to some glowing odd looking plant. With my luck they would be carnivorous.
I watched too many old horror movies as a kid- the slime monsters always glowed.
gary


No lighting, they are bioluminescence and glow when viewed in the dark.
 
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Beautiful, wish we had them here. Are they edible? I looked them up, they grow in North America. So far, every reference I've found mentions the Appalachian Mountains, North Carolina West Virginia as being places to find them.

I doubt they will be edible, but then again as the saying goes, all fungi are edible, some only once :)
 
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That's really cool. Do they stand out this much when seen with the naked eye? How long was your exposure?(The EXIF isn't showing.)

If they are fresh, as these ones are, possibly only a few days old. They do glow quite brightly, easily seen with the naked eye.

Each exposure was 3minutes f/6.3 ISO 1000 using a Z6 with 24-70 f/4 lens.

A bit of history from my experiences photographing these over the years. I used to use a Nikon APS-C DSLR with CamRanger to get the exposures. I started using the Nikkor 105mm macro lens, then bought the Nikkor 60mm macro so I could get closer to the subject. Less foreground scrub to worry about. In the end this became too cumbersome so I looked for alternatives. Many photographers will opt for a higher ISO, lower f stop, and keep the exposure to less than 30sec. Many have done successful focus stacks using this method. I saw some images this morning where one photographer using a Canon R5 did a 5 bracket focus stack at 3minutes each. The result look great.

The issue is, you don't really know what to set your camera to, as ambient light plus the age of the fungi will have an impact on the settings. In my experience its a matter of setting the focus, ISO, and aperture, then experimenting with the exposure until you get something acceptable. As these are generally taken in local reserves, if there is cloud cover, any light pollution is reflected down from the cloud, its the same if the moon is up.

Olympus have a Live Bulb mode, which allows you to watch the image as its being recorded. Fuji have a timer on the LCD in Bulb mode so you can see the exposure time. Both Olympus and Fuji use the same cheap remotes which Canon have been using for many years. Unfortunately Nikon don't have any of these nice to haves, plus require expensive remotes. The remote I purchased for the Nikon has an LCD backlit screen with a timer. So far it has worked well.

I found using a zoom lens also made life easier as it allowed me to setup the tripod, zoom in on the subject, ensure manual focus is set, then zoom back out for composition. You do need a torch to illuminate the subject so you can get this close to how you want it.

I could use an Olympus with its smarts and better apparent DOF due to smaller sensor, or a Fuji or Nikon APS-C. What I have found is their sensors must get very hot when doing these multiple long exposures. Hot pixels become an issue. Sure I can fix them in post, but it does concern me if it is causing long term damage to the sensors. Using a FF sensor doesn't appear to suffer as many hot pixels, which is why I have been using the Z6.
 
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If they are fresh, as these ones are, possibly only a few days old. They do glow quite brightly, easily seen with the naked eye.

Each exposure was 3minutes f/6.3 ISO 1000 using a Z6 with 24-70 f/4 lens.

A bit of history from my experiences photographing these over the years. I used to use a Nikon APS-C DSLR with CamRanger to get the exposures. I started using the Nikkor 105mm macro lens, then bought the Nikkor 60mm macro so I could get closer to the subject. Less foreground scrub to worry about. In the end this became too cumbersome so I looked for alternatives. Many photographers will opt for a higher ISO, lower f stop, and keep the exposure to less than 30sec. Many have done successful focus stacks using this method. I saw some images this morning where one photographer using a Canon R5 did a 5 bracket focus stack at 3minutes each. The result look great.

The issue is, you don't really know what to set your camera to, as ambient light plus the age of the fungi will have an impact on the settings. In my experience its a matter of setting the focus, ISO, and aperture, then experimenting with the exposure until you get something acceptable. As these are generally taken in local reserves, if there is cloud cover, any light pollution is reflected down from the cloud, its the same if the moon is up.

Olympus have a Live Bulb mode, which allows you to watch the image as its being recorded. Fuji have a timer on the LCD in Bulb mode so you can see the exposure time. Both Olympus and Fuji use the same cheap remotes which Canon have been using for many years. Unfortunately Nikon don't have any of these nice to haves, plus require expensive remotes. The remote I purchased for the Nikon has an LCD backlit screen with a timer. So far it has worked well.

I found using a zoom lens also made life easier as it allowed me to setup the tripod, zoom in on the subject, ensure manual focus is set, then zoom back out for composition. You do need a torch to illuminate the subject so you can get this close to how you want it.

I could use an Olympus with its smarts and better apparent DOF due to smaller sensor, or a Fuji or Nikon APS-C. What I have found is their sensors must get very hot when doing these multiple long exposures. Hot pixels become an issue. Sure I can fix them in post, but it does concern me if it is causing long term damage to the sensors. Using a FF sensor doesn't appear to suffer as many hot pixels, which is why I have been using the Z6.

Thanks for the long explanation. I can understand the challenge and I congratulate you on your success.
 
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One from this evening, a different location from last night. There was quite a bit of light pollution at this spot. Tried to keep the fungi shielded.

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Really neat. They stand out so much and capture your eye. I was thinking of mythological creatures that draw travelers to their doom (bit too much I know.) Thanks also for the information in your other posts.
 
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I went for a walk to the small reserve at the end of our street tonight

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This is what they look like during the day. Its much easier to find them during the day, however, you don't know how well they will glow until you check them out in the dark.

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One from this evening

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Hopefully with the recent rain, and what is forecasted for next week we get a fresh lot of these fungi growing.
 
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One from last night.


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A few from this evening, this should be the last of them for a while. Being out every night for a week is not good for my beauty sleep :)

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