Grand Central Station (Terminal) NYC

Joined
Nov 24, 2007
Messages
949
Location
NJ, USA
Completely restored back to it's 1913 splendor, Grand Central has become a midtown destination for five exquisite restaurants and cocktail lounges, 20 casual international eateries in the lower level Dining Concourse, gourmet foods from the Grand Central Market and the 50 unique specialty shops throughout the concourses, all in to addition to transportation.

Grand Central has also transformed itself into a venue for ongoing public events. Throughout the year, Vanderbilt Hall, the Terminal's 12,000 square foot former Main Waiting Room, is the site for ongoing free promotions and entertainment ranging from tennis exhibits to the annual Holiday Fair which brings 72 craftsmen, artisans and international importers to the Terminal selling an outstanding array of merchandise for holiday gifts.

Grand Central has become an international example of a successful urban project that gave new life to an historic building which otherwise would have been discarded and destroyed.


Grand Central Terminal (GCT) — often popularly (and incorrectly) called Grand Central Station or simply Grand Central — is a terminal station at 42nd Street and Park Avenue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Built by and named for the New York Central Railroad in the heyday of American long-distance passenger trains, it is the largest train station in the world by number of platforms:[3] 44, with 67 tracks along them. They are on two levels, both below ground, with 41 tracks on the upper level and 26 on the lower. When the Long Island Rail Road's new station, below the existing levels, opens (see East Side Access), Grand Central will offer a total of 75 tracks and 48 platforms. The terminal covers an area of 48 acres.

The terminal serves commuters traveling on the Metro-North Railroad to Westchester, Putnam, and Dutchess counties in New York State, and Fairfield and New Haven counties in Connecticut.

Although the terminal has been properly called "Grand Central Terminal" since 1913, many people continue to refer to it as "Grand Central Station". Technically, "Grand Central Station" is the name of the nearby post office, as well as the name of a previous rail station on the site, and is also used to refer to a New York City subway station at the same location.


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Joined
Apr 1, 2007
Messages
2,156
Location
Queens, NY
I've been in Grand Central Terminal a few times.......it's a great place to shoot. I believe you need to attain a permit to shoot on a tripod. If you like people watching, this is a place you should visit.
 
Joined
May 13, 2008
Messages
5,912
Location
NYC
Nice shots. They don't allow tripods (for obvious reasons), but you can balance your camera on one of the railings.
 

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