Gray Point (CaptureNX)

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Jun 26, 2005
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Corpus Christi, TX
Questions about setting my gray point.

I took a photo of my 18% gray card during the shoot.

I left my camera (D200) white balance setting as "flash" for the entire shoot.

In Capture NX, I changed the camera settings "exposure comp" to "CaptureNX" and then in Base Adjustments > Camera Adjustments > White Balance, I set the "gray point" using the photo of the gray card. I copied my settings and pasted them on to the shots I was working with. Below is an example.

Again, I left my WB alone in the camera. In the future, would it have been better to make a custom WB (in camera) once I shot the gray card? Or would that have only saved me time by not having to do it later in CaptureNX (like I did)?


NO OTHER ADJUSTMENTS made to this photo EXCEPT setting the gray point (in CaptureNX) from the gray card photo.

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The colour balance on the left image is OK, but the image itself is 2/3 eV underexposed.

It should look more like this (done: 2/3 eV exposure compensation, contrast correction and minor skin tone adjustment):

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Joined
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Iliah, I was only asking about setting the gray point within CaptureNX. Is what I did bascially the same as if I had did it 'in camera'?

I made adjustments to the photo to produce a final.

Thanks!
 
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>I was only asking about setting the gray point within CaptureNX.

I can't tell about grey point because of underexposure. NX has a bug in white balance, and here I can't see if it affected the result or not. Initially on both shots skin tones were wrong. The sequence of operations in NC/NX is first to apply eV and (preferably) contrast controls, then to apply WB.
 
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Iliah, in your spare time, you should write a book on proper processing techniques. It's always great to read your posts and have the lightbulb come on. I'd be first in line to buy your book, "NEF processing for Idiots". :biggrin:

Can't say that I'd read it though. Already have several books that I haven't read....:redface:
 
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Iliah, in your spare time, you should write a book on proper processing techniques. It's always great to read your posts and have the lightbulb come on. I'd be first in line to buy your book, "NEF processing for Idiots". :biggrin:
I'll second that idea.
 
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Gentlemen,

I'm afraid my raw workflow is too minimalistic. I try to stay with the same idea that raw processing is akin to film development, where consistency is the top priority. After raw is processed to tiff, it comes the time for Photoshop. My only concern is to pass as much data from raw file to Photoshop and to do those manipulations at the stage of raw processing that are impossible to replicate in Photoshop in a clean and simple way.

Those actions basically are: eV "compensation", white balance, establishing dynamic range.

There is a little of going back and forth, as after white balancing minor adjustments of eV slider might be needed.

After eV adjustment and white balance are done, the rest of establishing dynamic range is work with shadows (push/pull with L curve and/or D-Lightning), and finally - modifying the middle point of the curve and the approach to the highlights to shape the contrast. All details in deep shadows and near the highlights should be flattened with the curve. First and last stops of the dynamic range should be flat featureless gradations.

Raw processing includes pre-sharpening, which occurs before demosaicing (if raw converter permits, Nikon Capture is one of the few that does; and similary, pre-noise reduction. Those operations can't be accomplished after raw conversion with the same success because they affect demosaicing.

All other fancy things can be done much better (quality, consistency, speed) in Photoshop proper. Establishing dynamic range I do not try to set contrast exactly precise - it will be finalised in Photoshop because other edits that I will be doing in Photoshop affect it. The only thing to watch in raw processing in regards to contrast is to give more room to the tones of the image that contain important details.
 
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Iliah, in your spare time, you should write a book on proper processing techniques. It's always great to read your posts and have the lightbulb come on. I'd be first in line to buy your book, "NEF processing for Idiots". :biggrin:

Can't say that I'd read it though. Already have several books that I haven't read....:redface:
I have been telling Iliah that for a couple of years now without success.
 
Joined
Apr 24, 2005
Messages
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Location
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Very well stated Iliah. You always hear statements like, "Get it right in the camera" or "The print is what its all about". Those are all good things but sometimes knowing what happens in the middle can help you make better decisions at time of capture and thus improve the final output.

Gentlemen,

I'm afraid my raw workflow is too minimalistic. I try to stay with the same idea that raw processing is akin to film development, where consistency is the top priority. After raw is processed to tiff, it comes the time for Photoshop. My only concern is to pass as much data from raw file to Photoshop and to do those manipulations at the stage of raw processing that are impossible to replicate in Photoshop in a clean and simple way.

Those actions basically are: eV "compensation", white balance, establishing dynamic range.

There is a little of going back and forth, as after white balancing minor adjustments of eV slider might be needed.

After eV adjustment and white balance are done, the rest of establishing dynamic range is work with shadows (push/pull with L curve and/or D-Lightning), and finally - modifying the middle point of the curve and the approach to the highlights to shape the contrast. All details in deep shadows and near the highlights should be flattened with the curve. First and last stops of the dynamic range should be flat featureless gradations.

Raw processing includes pre-sharpening, which occurs before demosaicing (if raw converter permits, Nikon Capture is one of the few that does; and similary, pre-noise reduction. Those operations can't be accomplished after raw conversion with the same success because they affect demosaicing.

All other fancy things can be done much better (quality, consistency, speed) in Photoshop proper. Establishing dynamic range I do not try to set contrast exactly precise - it will be finalised in Photoshop because other edits that I will be doing in Photoshop affect it. The only thing to watch in raw processing in regards to contrast is to give more room to the tones of the image that contain important details.
 
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