handholding at slow ss 6 or 7?

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I just have one question on whether a Z6 would be better than a z7. If I would hand hold a Z at ss slow enough to challenge my steadiness would the higher resolution of the z7 show more blur when n image is blown up to say 11 by 14 size?
 
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More than likely yes because of the higher pixel density. This kind of thing happened a lot when Nikon went from the 12mp sensors in their DSLR to 24mp. Some people were stating that the 24mp sensor was not as sharp or showed a lot more blur. Some wanted to say it was mirror slap, but it later came out that because of the higher pixel density, the images are more susceptible to blur from hand shake.

Even with IBIS, it can be an issue.
 
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Yes, that is a big issue for me if I want to buy a Z. I have a D850 but use it almost all the time on a tripod. Az6 might be safer but I am used to 45 mp files, especially when I crop.
 
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Yes, that is a big issue for me if I want to buy a Z. I have a D850 but use it almost all the time on a tripod. Az6 might be safer but I am used to 45 mp files, especially when I crop.
The simple answer is to rent a Z7 for the weekend.

I have an essential tremor (age related, sigh) and stabilization is important to me. I even switched over to M43 for several years because I found doing side-by-side comparisons, the Olympus IBIS visually made a difference in my shots. The Z IBIS has brought me back to Nikon and is pretty effective in dampening camera movement. It's not magic but is clearly evident if you switch it off.

The other issue is that for some landscape, and even general shooting, you can get away with using the silent (all electronic) shutter which goes the next step in eliminating shutter shake issues.
 
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Yes, that is a big issue for me if I want to buy a Z. I have a D850 but use it almost all the time on a tripod. Az6 might be safer but I am used to 45 mp files, especially when I crop.
I have both the Z6 and Z7 at the moment and definitely see every flaw in my technique in the larger files. Also, I definitely see the difference in sharpness captured by my better lenses in those files. The jury is still out on whether my shooting warrants a need for the additional pixels and dynamic range of the Z7, but it sounds like yours might. If your handholding technique is better than mine (and it probably is!), you may very well not need a tripod as often, but IBIS is not a substitute for a completely supported camera, so I bet you'll still need it at times.
 
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Andy, on one hand you make me think a Z6 is better for me to hide my flaws.
On the other hand, you make me feel the sharpness of the Z7 is worth it over the Z6.

I know it was not your intention but you left me just as confused. I guess there is no one answer, but I need to figure out what is right for me. :)
BTW, I don't think my hand holding is better than yours. I use a tripod on 95% of my shots. (I use an 800 mm lens most of the time - BTW2, I don't plan to use long lenses on a Z)
 
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Andy, on one hand you make me think a Z6 is better for me to hide my flaws.
On the other hand, you make me feel the sharpness of the Z7 is worth it over the Z6.

I know it was not your intention but you left me just as confused. I guess there is no one answer, but I need to figure out what is right for me. :)
BTW, I don't think my hand holding is better than yours. I use a tripod on 95% of my shots. (I use an 800 mm lens most of the time - BTW2, I don't plan to use long lenses on a Z)
Allan,
I took a peek at some of your other threads and now see that you’re shooting a lot of birds, sometimes BIF. My two cents’ worth:

The D850 is better for what you’re doing than the Z7 in its current form. However, in low light where you’re trying to avoid high ISO with slower shutter speeds, the IBIS will be handy for your perched or nested subjects. Along those lines, if you’re planning to hang onto the D850 and put the appropriate body on your lens as the mission dictates, you’re probably fine with the Z6. If you mean to replace the D850 in your kit, it would be wise to wait for the upcoming improvements to the Z7 firmware to see if it can equal the D850’s AF capability.
 
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Oh I am definitely keeping the D850. The z camera would be an extra. I would not using it for moving wildlife. If I did not think photos would suffer from user shake I would get the z7.
 
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Oh I am definitely keeping the D850. The z camera would be an extra. I would not using it for moving wildlife. If I did not think photos would suffer from user shake I would get the z7.
I wonder if a local store would have a Z7 you could try out. If you have an XQD card for your D850 you could take it and then bring the photos home to inspect for camera shake. I have no experience with the Z7, but the Z6 is amazing handheld. The IBIS is very good. Perhaps it would be as helpful on the Z7.
 
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I wonder if a local store would have a Z7 you could try out. If you have an XQD card for your D850 you could take it and then bring the photos home to inspect for camera shake. I have no experience with the Z7, but the Z6 is amazing handheld. The IBIS is very good. Perhaps it would be as helpful on the Z7.
This is a good suggestion for Allan, who I gather has not experienced IBIS before (except, perhaps when pointing his cameras at large white wading birds). In fact, when I had a spare moment several months ago prior to taking the plunge into New Z-Land, I brought my D750 and a non-VR 300mm lens into the store and made photos of gaffer tape hanging from the far wall with my body and the same settings on a Z7. Like you, Terri, I already had expectations of IBIS performance from the relatively high bar set by Olympus, so while this quick and informal test did not disappoint, it wasn't really necessary. Could be very worthwhile to see this for others, though.
 
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I have a Z7 with the 'kit 24-70', I find it great for hand holding at low shutter speeds, I am not the steadiest of people so a camera with IBIS was important to me, with good technique and following all the best practices I can read up on for low light shooting I have managed to get as low as 1/8 and 1/15 second without blurring the shot. Please don't get me wrong I have also failed at these speeds as well but if I trying to get a shot at these speeds it tends to be something that I can re-shoot so a check of the image on the screen and zooming in before I move on is always carried out.

Most of my photography is landscape but I also enjoy night time photowalks in London and the Z7 is allowing me more scope to get images that I just would not have attempted with the D750.
 
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I do not own either a z6 or z7 camera, so this is based on prior studies and arguments.
A higher resolution sensor never has worse resolution than a lower resolution sensor. This argument went round and round when the d800 and d850's were released.
If you pixel peep, at 1:1, the higher res can look worse, with more motion unsharpness.
But if you resample it to the same size as the lower res sensor, they will look essentially the same. If you were to upres the lower resolution sensor to the same size as the z7, it would look worse. Now we do not buy a 46mp camera to get the details of a 24mp camera. To get the advantages of better resolution you may need better technique. But, at least my understanding from the earlier arguments about the d800's, if files are resampled to be the same size as the z6, the z7 will never have less resolution. Let the fights begin.
Gary
 
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I agree with you Gary - but if I am on the edge of shaking due to low iso more blur would show on the z7?
No.
If you shoot the d6 and the d7 side by side and print both to 11x14 the motion blur in the d7 will not be worse. It will look worse if you pixel peep 1:1, but not if both images are displayed at the same size. I handhold my d850 all the time and print big, 40x60" is a common size. If a lower resolution camera would give me a better image, I would use it.
Gary
 
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No.
If you shoot the d6 and the d7 side by side and print both to 11x14 the motion blur in the d7 will not be worse. It will look worse if you pixel peep 1:1, but not if both images are displayed at the same size. I handhold my d850 all the time and print big, 40x60" is a common size. If a lower resolution camera would give me a better image, I would use it.
Gary
The corollary: if you don’t print big and aren’t relying on aggressive crops, there is no need for the higher pixel density of either a D8xx or a Z7. Said another way, if you’re happy with your 20x30 prints from a 24MP sensor, you don’t need more pixels.

The arithmetic is pretty straightforward: if your printer is capable of 200dpi (dots per inch) output, throwing 4000x6000 pixels onto paper means 4000/200 by 6000/200 or a 20x30 inch print. My lab claims 300dpi capability, so they are probably upsampling my files when I order prints that large. I don’t do it often enough to warrant purchase of the necessary software. To my eye there is no breakdown in the printed resolution even from close viewing distances.

To take it a step further, haven’t many of us seen 20x30 prints that are quite sharp from the D5 whose output is only 20MP? And from the D4s with 16MP? And so on...

The other substantial advantage of the Z7 sensor is the increased dynamic range and 1/3 stop reduction in native ISO. But that’s for a different thread.
 
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One more thing to throw out there regarding shooting at slower shutter speeds. With the normal mechanical shutter....the affect of shutter shock is real. When shooting at shutter speeds slower than 1/200, I turn on the EFCS to mitigate. Depending in your want/desire you can also shoot full electronic shutter.

That doesn't work for me all the time based on the environment and conditions I shoot in.
 
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One more thing to throw out there regarding shooting at slower shutter speeds. With the normal mechanical shutter....the affect of shutter shock is real. When shooting at shutter speeds slower than 1/200, I turn on the EFCS to mitigate. Depending in your want/desire you can also shoot full electronic shutter.

That doesn't work for me all the time based on the environment and conditions I shoot in.
+1
As others have said, there ought to be a mode that enables EFCS at any shutter speed below 1/250 (or 1/500 or selectable) and disables it above. I've never found any significant downside to using EFCS although I'm a pretty pedestrian shooter.
 
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Acnomad, I completely agree. If you are going to print big, you can use all the resolution you can find. If you are going to print smaller, without major cropping, there is no need for the extra expense of larger files. If your final output is on line, you need even less resolution. Don't buy more than you need.
My problem is I never know my final output. I go out for a simple shoot and get an image someone wants 40x100". Been there, done that. So I almost always shoot with high res cameras just in case. (Unless lighting requires sky high iso's, there the d4 comes out of the bag.)
Gary
 
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Acnomad, by the way I like to print with a native resolution of at least 300 dpi if I can.
I will print at 250dpi, and I am not sure but maybe I can tell them apart. I have done the test and on some prints I can tell if I look really close, others I can not tell.
I have printed as low as 120dpi. I thought it looked like crap. Everyone else loved it.
Needed resolution really depends on type of output, type of paper and type of person looking at it.
Gary
 

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