has anyone ever downgraded?

Joined
Feb 6, 2006
Messages
19,988
Location
TX originally from Louisiana
Hey Diane,

Was Frank's help via e-mail/pm or over the phone? Just wondering if there was anything you could share with the rest of us that wouldn't involve Frank calling several members! :biggrin: Not that he would mind helping a fellow guinea, I just didn't want to bother him.

Actually, it was both! I'm betting that if he has the time whether it be through pm's or a thread, or phone call, he'd be happy to help. I think Frank and others on the forum like to see us beginners get better and succeed.

The most valuable lesson I've learned from Frank is my camera settings - how to not blow highlights, what the histogram is for, etc. I was shooting in "auto" way too much - in other words, my D50 was almost a point and shoot. Now, I'm learning the fine art of real photography! Just pm or something when you wanna know something! Don't be afraid to ask questions! THERE ARE NO STUPID QUESTIONS!
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2007
Messages
518
Location
NC
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #22
We have some folks here that have P&S cameras
So hope you sill stay with us..
You can still learn lots of great things here on photography. There are also alot of young folks here just like yourself sturggling through school.
So you have a great bunch of folks and support group when you need us.
Your education is very important and cameras will always be around when your ready:>))))))
thanks Gale. I really appreciate all your input. I will stick around definitly :smile:
 
Joined
Mar 23, 2007
Messages
4,924
Location
Collecchio, northern Italy
Hi all there
maybe what I'm saying is even more "counterstream" than any other here.. to me "coming back" should mean coming back to film, not to P&S. To tell the truth, as I had the opportunity to explain somewhere else, despite all digital tips and tricks which make possible almost everything, I'm still thinking to the film age as that period in which the photographer was the real protagonist of his shots, not the PP.. I mean, at least to me, every shot is necessarily made up of two phases: shooting and PP (what once was the dark room): well, without anything against Photoshop wizards (nay i really envy them), I still think that the greatest effort should be done BEFORE the shot, not after. I see all this reworking that now is so common like some a change of reality. Of course it's not always like that and I'm neither generalizing, but I think the beauty of a photo and the ability of a photographer is taking it straight with the right settings.. I hate spending time on pc... it's better shooting, isn't it? You know, the fact that PP with photoshop has become easy, I guess it influence in some way the strive of the photographer to take a better shot from the beginning. Digital also allowed that. Now we all take thousands of shots per months. Once people took hundreds, since it was too expensive. But the percentage of great shots was higher. Why?

Of course this is my opinion but no more. I'd like to know yours.

All the best.
 
Joined
Mar 23, 2007
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4,924
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Collecchio, northern Italy
p.s. For example, my brother, who shoots for pleasure, went to Cuba with his film camera - what a pity he's a cannonite :D :D :D - and took some wonderful shots as an innate ability worked greatly with a great (indeed) film camera, the EOS 30v. He was able to take some colours and expressions so natural and without any PP than just printing which were stunning to me. He's a reporter inside how I've ever dreamed to be!
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2007
Messages
518
Location
NC
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #26
Hi all there
maybe what I'm saying is even more "counterstream" than any other here.. to me "coming back" should mean coming back to film, not to P&S. To tell the truth, as I had the opportunity to explain somewhere else, despite all digital tips and tricks which make possible almost everything, I'm still thinking to the film age as that period in which the photographer was the real protagonist of his shots, not the PP.. I mean, at least to me, every shot is necessarily made up of two phases: shooting and PP (what once was the dark room): well, without anything against Photoshop wizards (nay i really envy them), I still think that the greatest effort should be done BEFORE the shot, not after. I see all this reworking that now is so common like some a change of reality. Of course it's not always like that and I'm neither generalizing, but I think the beauty of a photo and the ability of a photographer is taking it straight with the right settings.. I hate spending time on pc... it's better shooting, isn't it? You know, the fact that PP with photoshop has become easy, I guess it influence in some way the strive of the photographer to take a better shot from the beginning. Digital also allowed that. Now we all take thousands of shots per months. Once people took hundreds, since it was too expensive. But the percentage of great shots was higher. Why?

Of course this is my opinion but no more. I'd like to know yours.

All the best.





i didnt think film would come up in this thread...lol
I have little experience with film, but from what i know it doesnt make any sense unless you have a lot of money and time. I havnt really found any advantages to fil yet...even with basic pp skills a point and shoot can come close if not beat a film camera when it comes to prints.
In the end, i cant go back to film because i was never there.lol.
Point and shoot is my "safe spot"

I can post some of my earlier p&s shots if anybody wants to see...
 
Joined
Feb 6, 2006
Messages
19,988
Location
TX originally from Louisiana
Hey Zack, we always enjoy seeing photos! Even if they are from a point and shoot! Please, I hope you do stick around, keep your new camera, and we'll all help ya! oh yeah

WELCOME TO THE BEST FORUM IN TOWN, YOU'RE GONNA LOVE IT HERE!
 
Joined
May 17, 2005
Messages
12,615
Location
Pleasantville Ohio
Zack,

Whatever you’re involved in, whether it be photography, school, bank robbery, or whatever, requires patience and a high level of commitment to achieve excellence. [There are no free lunches.] Very few of us have the resources (time and money) to simultaneously pursue everything we would like to accomplish. Prioritize. If a DSLR does not rank high on your current list of priorities*, it doesn’t mean that you can’t continue to learn and enjoy photography at a more relaxed pace. A great deal can be learned using a P&S without having to deal with the intricacies and expense of a DSLR. [The camera does not a photographer make.]

Actually, the dividing lines between consumer, prosumer, and pro level cameras become more blurred every day. If you have a well-conceived plan, there’s sure to be something that fits both your current comfort level and your near term needs. The technology is changing rapidly. Step in when you have the resources to take advantage of the technology.

In the meantime, hang out here and let us learn from you while you learn from us. [We’ve even had some folks share their cell-phone pics – interesting stuff.]

*Make school #1!!
 
Joined
Oct 22, 2006
Messages
5,701
Location
Tripping the light fantastic
Not me

But someone I know did, went from 2 DSLR body so he did not have to change lenses all the time to a point and shoot, he never looked back after making the switch to a P&S camera, for him it made a lot of sense. I am looking into getting a point and shoot for myself but I'll be keeping the DSLR.
 
B

BigPixel

Guest
Zack, there are many good point n shoot digitals out there. I got my fiancee a Sony Cybershot 10.1 MP PnS last Christmas and it takes incredible pics. Even has many DSLR/SLR manual settings available. If a DSLR doesn't seem right, don't fret going back. Its all about the joy of shooting, not how much gear you hang around your neck.
 
L

Logan

Guest
what specifically do you think is that much better??(out of curiosity)
havent read all other posts, so this may have been said, but for me its the expandability and noise. try shooting iso 1600 on a PS, heck 400 gets noisy on some. that and then the option for speedy glass and dedicated macro and what not. no comparing apples and oranges in my opinion.:rolleyes:
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Messages
35,259
Location
Arizona
Real Name
Chris
Mike's got it right Zack. In fact, it's not even going back. If the way forward is with a compact camera, then who are we to argue with you? It is your own vision, so you should pick your own style. I, for one, am excited to see what you come up with!
 
Joined
Feb 19, 2006
Messages
8,397
Location
LA (Lower Arkansas)
There's lots of ways to look at this.

First, maybe a P&S would be best if you're more comfortable going this route. Like was mentioned above, there's a lot of good p&s cameras available that produce amazing shots.

Also, the D80 is quite an advanced camera for someone breaking into the DSLR market. There's a considerable learning curve associated with cameras such as this. You might consider other DSLR options. Personally, I find the D70/D70s hard to beat as an intorductory camera in this field. I managed to convince my mother to get one - which is remarkable in itself. Now she takes amazing shots - but now I'll have to teach her how to put them on her computer.

Finally, there's the economic factor. If you've overspent (I've done it.), sometimes there's no choice but to offload your equipment and start over at a later date - if you so choose. However, considering the fact that you're entering college, I'd highly recommend that you keep your setup. I'd give anything to get the chance to relive my college daze with a sweet camera and a couple good lenses.
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2006
Messages
1,937
Location
Nebraska, USA
I think everyone should have a P&S (and take it everywhere) to grab those shots that you would have said....I wished I'd have a camera with me. To this effect, there are certain advantages that a P&S photographer has over the big guns. Being inconspicuous is a major one.

To compare a DSLR to a P&S though, there really is no comparison. Here are a few things that may help (I may repeat some of what has been said).

1. Lag time (pressing the shutter button and waiting for it to fire) is much, much better with a DSLR. Most DSLR's have no noticable lag time.

2. Flash. Most P&S cameras are very poor in this department. The cameras are so small that the flash has to be close to the lens and thats why you get the dreaded red eye. With a DSLR, you can control the flash in many different ways.

3. Focus control. What I mean is "selective focus control". Some P&S cameras do O.K. with this, but come nowhere near the control of a DSLR.
I manual focus 99% of the time. I've lost so many shots with auto focus, because the camera did not focus in the spot where I wanted it.

4. Boken (the out of focus area of an image). This is where P&S fail big-time.
First, even on a DSLR, the correct lens for this beautiful effect is needed and then has to be used properly. Here is an example of Boken...this shot would not have been possible with a P&S.

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


First, the reach. This was taken with a 400mm lens. Most P&S will not reach that far. Then the focus. I manually focused on the birds head. A P&S would have a hard time just focusing on the head. And then the Boken, a P&S would think that the trees behind the bird, need to be in focus also, therefore losing the depth of field factor and making the image flat, instead of having a 3-d effect.

So, really the major difference is control. Do you want to be creative and be in control or do you want the camera to try and figure out the best way to capture that image?

The main thing though is to have "A" camera and make the best out of what you have.

Hope this helps.
 
Joined
May 1, 2007
Messages
43
Location
Ashburn, VA
A Point and Shoot will get you 80-90% of the pictures that most people want to take. The DSLR will get you the last few percent, but also open up vistas that you didn't even know you wanted before.

For documenting your life, taking pictures at parties, and just having something on the go, a P&S is more than sufficient. It's light and unobtrusive and ubiquitous. Strangers don't even notice when they're in the lens of a P&S, but they notice an SLR immediately.

As a recent grad, I can tell you that you never have enough money in college. Being poor is part of the experience :) Don't let the fear of that situation cause you to sell something you'll later miss. I traded valuables for money that I blew on incidentals, stuff I can't even remember any more like meals out and drinks.

Digital Photography has the benefit of being cheap once you've made the initial investment, which makes it great for a college student. I'm also involved in paintball which, like digital photography requires significant buy-in, but unlike photography requires a constant stream of cash. I give different advice for those players going into college and wondering if they'll have the cash to continue playing (They Won't).

I started with a P&S, then went to a D50, and am now looking for a D80. If you want to stay in the DSLR world, but the D80 seems like too hefty of an investment I would certainly be amiable towards working out some sort of trade.
 
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