Heart aches for Louisiana

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by cajun angel, May 17, 2011.

  1. I don't know why my beloved homestate has to suffer so with all the flooding and other natural disasters lately, but I can't help but hurt for all the people that will lose their homes, their businesses, and all the crops that will be lost. Our lovely home is so wealthy in its' commodities, beauty, and warmhearted people - not to mention a rich culture with French/cajun influence! If y'all have comments or photos you'd like to share - do so - just keep the comments nice and non-political!

    Avery Island (don't know it it will be affected, but it's a favorite place for us)
    4766021800_3f9fe86a2f_b.
     
  2. I hate that this is happening to you all also -- very sad
    Sorry that I don't have any pictures to share
     
  3. My sister lives in Brusley and dunno yet if she'll have to evacuate. Another sad issue is so many don't have flood insurance.
     
  4. I live in St. Joseph, LA, right on the river and halfway between Vicksburg and Natchez. The river is supposed to crest at Vicksburg Thursday (May 19), and crest at Natchez on Saturday (May 21). That means we'll probably see the crest Friday.

    Right now, the river is about 12 to 15 feet from the top of our levee, and it hasn't risen much (if at all) in the past week.

    Just gotta wait it out, although I'd hate to be flooded out again. I was flooded out of New Orleans by Katrina.
     
  5. I wish my house and property was large enough, I'd tell ya come to my house. I know this is tough on ya - especially since Katrina, maybe somehow the flooding won't get too bad.
     
  6. Brusly should be fine. The opening of the Morganza floodgates will keep the pressure off of the levee in Brusly.

    Please don't let the news people's over the top description of the "Choice between the little towns and the big cities" fool you. If they didn't open the Morganza, the water would have overtopped it anyway, and they would have been flooded just the same if notr worse if that gates had been damaged. At least when they let the water lower itself before the crest gets there, it will be less pressure on the levees and they won't break.
    ALL of the people living in the parts being flooded right now knew perfectly well that they were living in the same place that flooded many times before.

    That doesn't make the flood easier, it just puts it into the correct frame.
     
  7. Chris, do you know how much farmland/crops will be affected? I know we have rice, soy, cotton, sugercane, and probably more - And I know the engineers are trying to do what's best but it hurts just the same for so many, especially if they don't have insurance!
     
  8. shtarka1

    shtarka1

    Feb 1, 2008
    Boston
    Always in our Thoughts & Prayers..
     
  9. kbutler84

    kbutler84

    301
    Feb 22, 2011
    Louisiana
    :actions1:
     
  10. cbbr

    cbbr

    Nov 21, 2009
    Baton Rouge, La.
    This is an important point that you will never, never see in the media.
     
  11. venchka

    venchka

    633
    Sep 28, 2010
    Texas
    Katrina blew me out of Louisiana after multiple decades. We landed in Texas. My brother is still in Youngsville. They will be fine. Ivan, Katrina, Rita, Ike, the tornadoes and now the River have dealt the Gulf Coast a string of bad hands. We'll be ok. I am so glad to see folks doing for themselves & each other. Instead of waiting for the Gummermint to take care of things.
    It takes more than a little water to ruin a good party!
     
  12. The crops are the biggest problem. Not that many people live in there permanently. It is mostly camps, vacations cabins and a few homes. The danger is that the flooding would be high enough to go down to the bottom of the lower ends of the levees where they are not as high and backwash into some of the small towns, which would triple or more the number of people harmed.
    That is very fertile land with many acres of cane, grass for hay and other crops are planted there. That is going to hurt the worst. The ugliest part is that insurance companies are claiming that this is not an act of god, since they are opening the gates. I guess they would prefer that the Morganza floodgates, get overtopped and washed away before they paid for flooding.
     
  13. cbbr

    cbbr

    Nov 21, 2009
    Baton Rouge, La.
    IIRC the crop insurance is going to pay? I did hear that it will hurt the crabbing, but help the crawfish a lot.
     
  14. I hadn't heard that the crop insurance decided to pay. But that also leaves the homeowners.
    I will help the crawfish, but it will also hurt the oysters. They certainly don't need that after the BP disaster. They haven't really recovered from that. The Louisiana oyster beds are the last natural oyster beds left in this hemishpere.

    When they open the Bonnet Carre (pronounced like bonny carry) spillway into Lake Pontchartrain, that will start another whole round of problems. Although there aren't any homes or crops out there. I've only seen one camp near there.
     
  15. cbbr

    cbbr

    Nov 21, 2009
    Baton Rouge, La.
    True, I really feel for the fishermen & farmers. It will decimate the oysters and the fishing. After BP I was at Parasol's and oyster poboys were $20+...
     
  16. I wish our beautiful state didn't have to suffer so - though I've lived in TX since 1986, my heart is still back in Louisiana. I still have so many photos I want to get and haven't been where all I want to go to YET!
     
  17. venchka

    venchka

    633
    Sep 28, 2010
    Texas
    Ordinary homeowners insurance does not pay for damage from rising water regardless of the source. Federal Flood Insurance pays for damage from rising water no matter what the source. That is why the program exists.
     
  18. venchka

    venchka

    633
    Sep 28, 2010
    Texas
    Opening Bonnet Carre has always had a beneficial effect on the the Lake, The Rigolets and the coastal marsh. It should be especially beneficial this year if it helps flush out any remaining trapped oil.
     
  19. Well, from what I've heard, our people still haven't gotten much help since Katrina. At least I haven't heard much about restoration going on. I wonder if the situation now will make any difference?
     
  20. There was never any oil in that lake.
    As for the Bonnet Carre opening, while many aspects of the lake enjoy the fresh water, others do not.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.