Helicon Focus or Zerene Stacker?

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If I read this correctly, it must be picking up Adobe DNG Converter which is a component of my Photoshop CC installation.

DG
 

Growltiger

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If I read this correctly, it must be picking up Adobe DNG Converter which is a component of my Photoshop CC installation.

DG
It is clearly going to use it. If you didn't have it installed already maybe it helps you install it. Adobe DNG Converter isn't really part of CC, it is free of charge for anyone to use.
Do you really want to use Adobe RGB by the way?
 
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https://cognisys-inc.com/stackshot-macro-rail-package.html

StackShot is designed to:
>> automate the image collection process for focus stacking just add the camera specific shutter cable. The shutter cable is the communication link between the camera and StackShot. It allows the StackShot controller to control your camera to make the image capturing process completely automated. The shutter cable is required if using StackShot stand alone (with no computer) or with Zerene Stacker. No shutter cable is required if used with Helicon Remote.>>

(I have had my StackShot for more than ten years now so naming the act of exposing the original series of images "Focus Stacking"seems to precede whatever Nikon may choose to call it?!).

StackShot uses a very accurate stepping motor to move the camera in minute but programmable steps between each exposure. I drive it by radio through CamRanger and an IPad and this is the rig which I put together: the blue rubber bands and bulldog clips being the key component of course.

My CamRanger drives the StackShot remotely by WiFi and the iPad acts as a remote viewfinder

_ANN4654-CamRanger+StackShot-front-small.jpg
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This arrangement provides the perfect large-format LiveView viewfinder for product shots or macros.

These pictures show a Wimberley jointed arm (attached to the Arca-swiss plate on the camera) supporting the iPad.

A pair of Bowen's double-ended Multiclips clip onto the iPad to support its front cover so that it can act as a sunshade for the screen.

The iPad is running the CamRanger software which, in this particular case, is driving not only the camera settings but is also programming and driving the Cognisys StackShot Rail.

The iPad could, in fact, be positioned anywhere within the WiFi and YN radio-transmitter range of the camera; and the CaddieBuddy system includes both a very effective clamping-foot and a strap which could buckle the iPad to any handy support or be hung around the photographer's neck.

The CamRanger WiFi unit sits in its pouch hooked onto the camera and it is connected by cable to CamRanger's new Hub which, in turn, connects to the StackShot Control box.

In this arrangement, I clamped an Arca-swiss style plate to the underside of the StackShot's Rail assembly and fixed the StackShot Control box to it with two rubber bands.

I built another contraption which uses some of these components to fire remote flashes which are set to back-light the scene remotely while I focus the camera manually.

A dismally dull and grey morning and Crocuses (which needed to be photographed before they got flattened by the impending storm) led to the creation of my new tool.

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Here I have an iPad held by the jaws on the extremely versatile and most useful CaddieBuddy clamping system. The clamp's Gorilla-pod-type foot is threaded and is screw-mounted onto Manfrotto's #166 Flash Bracket — which also supports a Nikon SB-900 Speedlight.

The iPad is using CamRanger software to communicate by its own WiFi network with, and control all the settings on, a distant camera (which could be anywhere within 150 feet from the iPad).

Mounted into the hot-shoe on the camera is YongNuo's YN-266N-TX radio transmitter.
The SB-900 sits in a responding YongNuo YN-266 Radio receiver.

Having set the camera up among the crocuses on a tripod for a worm's eye view, all I had to do was to move around with my new Walk-about Flash-Bracket; view the scene in Live View on the iPad (where I could also set all of the camera's controls and the focusing point (without having to crawl around in the wet grass); and trigger the shutter by hitting the Capture button on the iPad.

The shutter triggered the YongNuo Transmitter which simultaneously fired the Speedlight on the Flash-bracket — in addition to the other off-camera flashes which I had set up.

Behold: Crocuses backlit by brilliant "sunshine" while the dull cloudy ambient light provided the perfect Fill.

107_D3S0309-Crocuses-web.jpg
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StackShot is designed to:
>> automate the image collection process for focus stacking

StackShot might or might not be trying to use the terminology incorrectly. We would have to ask them to clarify the information they're intending to convey to be sure. If we interpret that stament you provided literally as it is written, that it automates the process for focus stacking, I could argue that it's being used correctly. The clarification is that their collection process gets everything ready for the focus stacking to then take place. If StackShot actually meant to explain that they automate the process of focus stacking, which seems to be the way you're interpreting it, I definitely argue that the company is using the terminology inaccurately.

CamRanger and other companies certainly use incorrect terminology. It happens a lot in the photography industry. Even so, just because some companies use incorrect terminology doesn't make that terminology accurate.

One of the top people at CamRanger not only agreed with me that his company uses the incorrect terminology with regard to focus stacking but he also explained the business reason that they intentionally and consciously do so. That reason has to do with their belief that there are too many people that inaccurately think focus stacking is the act of acquiring the series of photos. When those people then ask at trade shows and the like if CamRanger does focus stacking, the representatives don't want to have to explain that, no, it doesn't, but that it does do focus bracketing. Another way of putting it is that CamRanger reps don't want to have to explain to prospective customers that they should be asking if CamRanger does focus bracketing, which it does do.

The distinction between focus bracketing and focus stacking is important because some cameras and external devices do or aid only in focus bracketing, whereas some cameras do both focus bracketing and focus stacking. If someone explains to me that they want to buy a camera that does focus stacking and if I have clarified that they understand what focus stacking does and doesn't encompass, I would then explain that Nikon cameras only do the focus bracketing but that some Olympus cameras do both the bracketing and the stacking.

We as individuals in photography forums can choose to use correct terminology, which will help ensure effective communication, or we can choose to use inaccurate terminology, which will help ensure confusion.
 
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I choose to use whatever phrase that I feel like using; but then I am not too accurate when counting the number of angels dancing on the head of a pin!
 
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https://cognisys-inc.com/stackshot-macro-rail-package.html

StackShot is designed to:
>> automate the image collection process for focus stacking just add the camera specific shutter cable. The shutter cable is the communication link between the camera and StackShot. It allows the StackShot controller to control your camera to make the image capturing process completely automated. The shutter cable is required if using StackShot stand alone (with no computer) or with Zerene Stacker. No shutter cable is required if used with Helicon Remote.>>

Nice setup Ann

CamRanger works well with StackShot, I use the combo as well, although not very often as I don't have the battery pack for the StackShot. My use of it is indoors.
 
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The distinction between focus bracketing and focus stacking is important because some cameras and external devices do or aid only in focus bracketing, whereas some cameras do both focus bracketing and focus stacking. If someone explains to me that they want to buy a camera that does focus stacking and if I have clarified that they understand what focus stacking does and doesn't encompass, I would then explain that Nikon cameras only do the focus bracketing but that some Olympus cameras do both the bracketing and the stacking.

Not according to Nikon, they do Focus Shift :)

Regardless of the terminology, the results are all I'm interested in
 
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Regardless of the terminology, the results are all I'm interested in

That's only because you're already familiar with the accurate terminology. In many situations, you can't get the desired results until you already properly understand the terminology. As an example, in consideration of the many people following the forum that have never done any focus bracketing or focus stacking, it's far more helpful to them to use the correct terminology. It simply can't be viably argued that to use the incorrect terminology is more helpful than using the correct terminology. To use whatever terminology we want to use is inconsiderate of those that aren't yet familiar with the processes.
 
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That's only because you're already familiar with the accurate terminology. In many situations, you can't get the desired results until you already properly understand the terminology. As an example, in consideration of the many people following the forum that have never done any focus bracketing or focus stacking, it's far more helpful to them to use the correct terminology. It simply can't be viably argued that to use the incorrect terminology is more helpful than using the correct terminology. To use whatever terminology we want to use is inconsiderate of those that aren't yet familiar with the processes.

Unfortunately various forms of terminology, particularly with regards photography, have been mixed up for years. HDR is one which comes to mind. Sure some cameras and 3rd party devices can merge the exposure bracketed images, but for the most part it is done in post.

I agree with you regarding consideration for those reading these types of threads on the forum. Particularly when they are trying to learn new processes.
 

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