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Help required removing graduated colour cast

Discussion in 'Retouching and Post Processing' started by fishbio, Apr 12, 2007.

  1. Hi Retouching gurus

    The church ceiling in the attached photo was obviously lit by 2 light sources of different colour, causing a blue cast at one end of the picture. I'd really appreciate it if someone could help me with a method to get a white background overall. I have Photoshop CS2 but I'm a new user. I can deal with straightening it on my own!

    Many thanks,

    Larry

    456583155_d62f4798ce_o.
     
  2. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    Larry was there alot of red and gold

    I fiddled with it , but think I am off on those colors not sure..

    Peano where are you :>))
    Chicken lady calling:>)))
     
  3. jeremyInMT

    jeremyInMT Guest

    I don't have a calibrated system here at work, but this is a prime example for the removal of color cast via Lab mode in Photoshop.
     
  4. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    Well I got it out with lab also but still not sure what the colors of red and gold should be
     
  5. Iliah

    Iliah

    Jan 29, 2005
    nowhere
    Make a curve adjustment layer, and use a gradient as a mask :) 
     
  6. RFCGRAPHICS

    RFCGRAPHICS

    Apr 30, 2005
    Here is another way to retouch this image. It basically involved selective: color desaturation, burn/dodge of shadow-mid-highlights, color replacement via painting, sharpening,

    Original
    [​IMG]

    Retouch
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    open hue/sat menu and select blue in drop down menu. Next click eyedropper on blue cast shown with the asterisk



    [​IMG]
    desaturate the blue background rendering it a monotone grey


    [​IMG]
    next select your dodge tool and choose highlights


    [​IMG]
    Do a dodging of the background area you want to lighten


    [​IMG]
    use magic wand to select the monotone area you want to add color. Then use the select similar function in the select menu. Use eyedropper to select a gold tone from your image

    [​IMG]
    Select a paintbrush with a 3 -7 opacity and paint over the monotone areas.


    Then finish your retouch with selective burn dodge saturation sharpen.
    [​IMG]


    Regards

    RFC
     
  7. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    Robert
    That is the way i did it. But i think i have the colors sat to much
    Thanks for the tut
     
  8. RFCGRAPHICS

    RFCGRAPHICS

    Apr 30, 2005
    Hi Gale,

    To be totally honest....when I post process...I just wing it :D 


    Regards

    RFC
     
  9. Many thanks to Gale, Jeremy, Iliah and Robert for replying.

    Robert, I'm amazed at the detail you took the time to provide. It's just what I need, given my level of experience with Photoshop.

    I'll give it a go and let you know how it turns out.

    Cheers,

    Larry
     
  10. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    Larry you never said how much red and yellow(gold) is in the actual
    For my own curiosity to see how close I got. You were there not me:>)))
     
  11. Hi Gale

    My monitor isn't calibrated so I don't really know how to answer. I think if you look at the gold and red in the area with the white background colour in the original I posted, you won't be too far off. I think the reds have probably faded from when they were applied about 300 years ago!

    Cheers,

    Larry
     
  12. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    Awww thanks

    Think Robert nailed it then
     
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