help with powerline adapters

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Since this isn't specifically related to PC or Mac but I had to pick on of the two anyway so, I went for the first one :)

I have an issue with a set powerline adaptors from devolo. I have just setup the configuration below.

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For some context: I use a cable modem for internet connection. This one is from the provider.
My internet subscription comes with a 1 Gb/sec connection.
Normally our devices are connected to an access point Netgear nighthawk r8500. This is actually a router but it is configured as an access point. This device is connected with a network cable to the cable modem.
This gives us around 400 to 500 Mb/sec with wifi, downstairs.
Up till a week ago, this gave around 300 Mb/sec with wifi upstairs.
In the last week, we noticed the speed upstairs only reached around 80 Mb/sec anymore.
Hence my idea to purchase the powerline equipment.
The installation went fine but unfortunately, upstairs we still only get around 80 Mb/sec. The device devolo-624 is connected directly to the cable modem with the cable from the set I bought.
I connected a pc directly with a cable to the device devolo-165 and to my amazement, this also resulted in a speed of around 80 Mb/sec.
Just to be clear: when I was looking into this, nobody else in the house was using an internet connection. We are only two in the house.

This is "somewhat" outside my experience :rolleyes:
Hoping someone might have an idea on how to proceed.

Of course, the strange thing is the fact that the internet speed dropped so drastically on the devices upstairs.
More precisely, in the room the furthest away from the Netgear device.
In the room just above, the internet speed is still well over 200 Mb/sec and with the same laptop.
Perhaps I should have gone for a more in-depth troubleshooting on the access point first but I didn't see a starting point and I don't have any real knowledge about those devices either.
I can reset them, see that the internet speed downstairs remains the same and that's about it.
 

Growltiger

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I have experience of the TP-Link powerline adapters, and the experience has been very good in multiple installations at various places.
(Despite having most of the house ethernet cabled and four gigabit ethernet switches and four wifi access points, I also have an unusual setup with two independent pairs of powerline adapters!)

First some suggestions on the wifi speed upstairs, and the way it dropped. I'm not familiar with the r8500 but I'm guessing that you have it configured with combined 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands, i.e. both with the same SSID. You probably also have it configured to automatically choose the channels in the bands. You have not said if you have neighbours close enough for their wifi to interfere. My recommendations:

1. Use a wifi analyser to find out exactly what channels are in use and how strong the signals are. On an android phone I use a free app called Wifi analyzer. Better still on a laptop I use MetaGeek inSSIDer. They are both free and are valuable tools. You can then configure the access point to use channels with no interference. Do the check both downstairs and upstairs and see what the signal levels are.

2. Configure the access point to separate the 2.4 and 5GHz bands. I'm fairly certain you will find that option. You need to then assign a different SSID to each. So when you connect you can choose the 2.4 or 5 band. I find that 2.4 has a better range through walls and 5 less range but faster. So you can see which works best for you.

Now on to your original question.
1. Are you SURE you disabled wifi on the computer upstairs. It is an easy mistake to make - you plug in the ethernet cable and forget to turn off the wifi. That would explain why you still get only 80Mb/s, it is still using the wifi.

2. Did you plug both powerline devices directly into wall power sockets? You must never plug them into extension power sockets or extender power adapters of any sort, such as the ones with 4 or more sockets. You must only plug them into their own dedicated wall sockets. The instructions should have told you that.

3. Do you have any unusual electrical devices running that could be putting interference on the powerlines? Do you have neighbours who might be using powerline devices?

I hope something above helps, let us know.
 
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A thought.

I recall years ago when X1 home automation was a thing.
You have three power lines coming into the house, hot-1, hot-2, and neutral.
120vac = hot-1 to neutral, hot-2 to neutral.​
240vac = hot-1 to hot-2​
The 120vac circuits in your house is wired to one or the other hot lines.
If your devices A and B are on hot-1, the X1 worked fine.
But if device A was on hot-1 and device B on hot-2, you had to communicate from hot-1 to hot-2, that was the issue. Unless you had a 240vac appliance ON, there is nothing in your house linking hot-1 to hot-2. This "might" be what you are running into, with the power line adapters.
 
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Thanks for your reply, Richard.

The access point has indeed two bands, one for 2.4 and one for 5. These do have a different name though.
All the devices have always been connected to the 5 GHz band.
The device is meant to switch channels when there would be too much interference. This doesn't seem to be the case, based on a tool from Netgear I have on my system downstairs.
I could have check this upstairs as well to make sure the situation is not different there.
This would be for tomorrow. I searched for the Wifi analyzer but there is a number of apps with that name that are free. You wouldn't happen to know the publisher?
I see one by "olgor.com", one by "farproc" but both of these have advertising and one by VREM and this one is open source. So, I guess this is the one you meant. This shows a result downstairs that corresponds to the situation I saw in the Netgear tool.

About the disabling of the wifi, my laptop from work seems to take care of that automatically. I know because at my desk, I use a network cable - I'm one of the few in the office - but when we go into one of the conference rooms, we use the wifi. Back at my desk, I plug in the cable again and I'm using the ethernet adapter.
I am suspicious by nature so, I checked anyway: during my tests no wifi networks were connected and the network settings showed that the internet connection was going through the ethernet adapter.

About the dedicated wall sockets, there I had to use an extension power socket downstairs, for the device connected to the cable modem. Why: because otherwise I would have needed to do some remodeling of a wooden panel.
I was under the impression it either wouldn't work or it would.
Do you think this kind of drop in speed could be the effect of that? If so, I will have to remove a part of the panel anyway.

As for electrical devices, there is only one new addition, a multipurpose oven, and I already disconnected it to check the impact on the speed upstairs through the r8500. So, prior to the activation of the powerline adapters but there was no effect - luckily.

So tomorrow, I'm going to see if there's no interference with the channels used by the 5G network from the r8500 upstairs. Perhaps one of our neighbours installed a wifi extender upstairs or something like that.
After all, the configuration with that r8500 worked for a good number of years without issues.
When you confirm the device linking to the cable modem really needs to be directly in a wall socket as well, then some sawing is called for.
By the way, if the powerline adapter works as it should, what kind of internet connection speed could I expect using a network cable then? Relative to the actual speed on the cable modem.


I have experience of the TP-Link powerline adapters, and the experience has been very good in multiple installations at various places.
(Despite having most of the house ethernet cabled and four gigabit ethernet switches and four wifi access points, I also have an unusual setup with two independent pairs of powerline adapters!)

First some suggestions on the wifi speed upstairs, and the way it dropped. I'm not familiar with the r8500 but I'm guessing that you have it configured with combined 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands, i.e. both with the same SSID. You probably also have it configured to automatically choose the channels in the bands. You have not said if you have neighbours close enough for their wifi to interfere. My recommendations:

1. Use a wifi analyser to find out exactly what channels are in use and how strong the signals are. On an android phone I use a free app called Wifi analyzer. Better still on a laptop I use MetaGeek inSSIDer. They are both free and are valuable tools. You can then configure the access point to use channels with no interference. Do the check both downstairs and upstairs and see what the signal levels are.

2. Configure the access point to separate the 2.4 and 5GHz bands. I'm fairly certain you will find that option. You need to then assign a different SSID to each. So when you connect you can choose the 2.4 or 5 band. I find that 2.4 has a better range through walls and 5 less range but faster. So you can see which works best for you.

Now on to your original question.
1. Are you SURE you disabled wifi on the computer upstairs. It is an easy mistake to make - you plug in the ethernet cable and forget to turn off the wifi. That would explain why you still get only 80Mb/s, it is still using the wifi.

2. Did you plug both powerline devices directly into wall power sockets? You must never plug them into extension power sockets or extender power adapters of any sort, such as the ones with 4 or more sockets. You must only plug them into their own dedicated wall sockets. The instructions should have told you that.

3. Do you have any unusual electrical devices running that could be putting interference on the powerlines? Do you have neighbours who might be using powerline devices?

I hope something above helps, let us know.
 
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I think it's a bit different over here.
There's only 1 phase over two lines in use inside the house, completed with a 3rd neutral line that connects to the ground, a loop under the foundation of the house.
The voltage of that phase is 220V overall.
So, that shouldn't create the problem I suppose?

A thought.

I recall years ago when X1 home automation was a thing.
You have three power lines coming into the house, hot-1, hot-2, and neutral.
120vac = hot-1 to neutral, hot-2 to neutral.​
240vac = hot-1 to hot-2​
The 120vac circuits in your house is wired to one or the other hot lines.
If your devices A and B are on hot-1, the X1 worked fine.
But if device A was on hot-1 and device B on hot-2, you had to communicate from hot-1 to hot-2, that was the issue. Unless you had a 240vac appliance ON, there is nothing in your house linking hot-1 to hot-2. This "might" be what you are running into, with the power line adapters.
 
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Messages
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Location
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I think it's a bit different over here.
There's only 1 phase over two lines in use inside the house, completed with a 3rd neutral line that connects to the ground, a loop under the foundation of the house.
The voltage of that phase is 220V overall.
So, that shouldn't create the problem I suppose?

If you live in 220v world, disregard what I said.
 

Growltiger

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"The access point has indeed two bands, one for 2.4 and one for 5. These do have a different name though.
All the devices have always been connected to the 5 GHz band."

Try connecting on the 2.4GHz band by selecting the other SSID. You may find slower gives faster.

"I see one by "olgor.com", one by "farproc" but both of these have advertising and one by VREM and this one is open source. So, I guess this is the one you meant. This shows a result downstairs that corresponds to the situation I saw in the Netgear tool."

I use the farproc one with advertising. Author is Kevin Yuan.
A problem with the Android ones (all of them I think) is that even if configured with the most frequent refresh, it is too slow when walking around. You have to keep waiting a minute or two to get an accurate result. So it is far better to get the laptop software from MetaGeek. It refreshes every few seconds. You have to set up an account but they have never spammed me.
What you need to do most is check upstairs.

"About the dedicated wall sockets, there I had to use an extension power socket downstairs, for the device connected to the cable modem. Why: because otherwise I would have needed to do some remodeling of a wooden panel.
I was under the impression it either wouldn't work or it would.
Do you think this kind of drop in speed could be the effect of that? If so, I will have to remove a part of the panel anyway."

Yes, this could easily explain it. The powerline devices require to be plugged into the wall directly.
I won't bore you with the details of why I have two powerline pairs but it is a similar sort of issue, where I originally got speeds of only 17Mb/s to one of the destinations.
Don't you have even two wall sockets? Do an experiment by unplugging everything from the two sockets and put the powerline device on one and use an extender on the other for just what is essential - the modem and the access point.
If you really only have one wall socket run a long ethernet cable to the nearest place you can plug it in to the wall (temporarily).
I'm trying to get you to do the experiment to prove it works before you start ripping the wall apart!

Your profile doesn't say your country. ac12's suggestion was very good, and could even apply in the 230V world if you have a house with 3 phase wiring. Three phase wiring is used in office buildings. This is most unlikely in a home unless you have a large house with special electrical needs - and yes, I have come across this.
 

Growltiger

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The need to plug directly into the wall is one of the reasons TP-Link offer a variety of products here with pass-through power, like this one (this one doesn't do wifi but others do):
1628417127914.png
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With the set that I have they only work if all are connected to the same "Ring Main" i.e. The same fuse or circuit breaker.
DG
 

Growltiger

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With the set that I have they only work if all are connected to the same "Ring Main" i.e. The same fuse or circuit breaker.
DG
They should also work if they are all on circuits off the same distribution board.
If you didn't have them both plugged directly into the wall they will be much more limited and may refuse to work at all.

A trick if they won't pair is to pair them when plugged in next to each other and then move one to where you want it.
 
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"The access point has indeed two bands, one for 2.4 and one for 5. These do have a different name though.
All the devices have always been connected to the 5 GHz band."

Try connecting on the 2.4GHz band by selecting the other SSID. You may find slower gives faster.

"I see one by "olgor.com", one by "farproc" but both of these have advertising and one by VREM and this one is open source. So, I guess this is the one you meant. This shows a result downstairs that corresponds to the situation I saw in the Netgear tool."

I use the farproc one with advertising. Author is Kevin Yuan.
A problem with the Android ones (all of them I think) is that even if configured with the most frequent refresh, it is too slow when walking around. You have to keep waiting a minute or two to get an accurate result. So it is far better to get the laptop software from MetaGeek. It refreshes every few seconds. You have to set up an account but they have never spammed me.
What you need to do most is check upstairs.

"About the dedicated wall sockets, there I had to use an extension power socket downstairs, for the device connected to the cable modem. Why: because otherwise I would have needed to do some remodeling of a wooden panel.
I was under the impression it either wouldn't work or it would.
Do you think this kind of drop in speed could be the effect of that? If so, I will have to remove a part of the panel anyway."

Yes, this could easily explain it. The powerline devices require to be plugged into the wall directly.
I won't bore you with the details of why I have two powerline pairs but it is a similar sort of issue, where I originally got speeds of only 17Mb/s to one of the destinations.
Don't you have even two wall sockets? Do an experiment by unplugging everything from the two sockets and put the powerline device on one and use an extender on the other for just what is essential - the modem and the access point.
If you really only have one wall socket run a long ethernet cable to the nearest place you can plug it in to the wall (temporarily).
I'm trying to get you to do the experiment to prove it works before you start ripping the wall apart!

Your profile doesn't say your country. ac12's suggestion was very good, and could even apply in the 230V world if you have a house with 3 phase wiring. Three phase wiring is used in office buildings. This is most unlikely in a home unless you have a large house with special electrical needs - and yes, I have come across this.

The need to plug directly into the wall is one of the reasons TP-Link offer a variety of products here with pass-through power, like this one (this one doesn't do wifi but others do):
View attachment 1687466

With the set that I have they only work if all are connected to the same "Ring Main" i.e. The same fuse or circuit breaker.
DG

They should also work if they are all on circuits off the same distribution board.
If you didn't have them both plugged directly into the wall they will be much more limited and may refuse to work at all.

A trick if they won't pair is to pair them when plugged in next to each other and then move one to where you want it.

The two power sockets are indeed on the same circuit breaker but not on the same fuse. I'm pretty sure that wouldn't be allowed to have the power sockets from different floors on one fuse.
I'm in Belgium by the way, our house was built in 1992.

I have the kind with the pass-through power and with wifi. The connection is definitely established between the two units but the resulting speed upstairs is abnormally low. Not better than without the power line adapters/
Today I checked upstairs for any interfering networks but there aren't any. I tried connecting to the 2.4 GHz network. It was possible but the resulting internet speed was even worse.

So, I seem to remain with two options:
1. have a part of the panel removed to be able to plug the adapter directly in the wall socket. The panel is the backside from a large wall unit that cannot be moved by us - really heavy and with heavy gliding doors. The whole had to be lined out carefully by the people that installed this.
There are two sockets behind the panel and while there is plenty of room in a recess to handle and hold the power plugs, not so for the adapter. I don't have the tools to remove an extra part of that panel. I'll need to have someone do that with the chance that afterwards, the issue wouldn't be solved anyway. Small chance though, I suppose? @Growltiger any idea on what relative speed using a network cable for connection could be expected afterwards? 100% of the maximum available speed, 75%, 50% ?
2. Identify and solve the reason why the original configuration with the netgear r8500 access point doesn't work anymore as it did for some four years up till the last weeks.
Nothing seems to have changed in that period and there still isn't any interference from other networks.
I suppose a component of the radio on the router could be defective causing it to be far less effective. This seems to correspond with the findings so far.
This option would then mean to replace the router and see if I get everything back to the way it was before. With the chance that the replacing device doesn't solve this either.
Over here we have a fortnight to return goods bought online, no questions asked.

Dilemma and I'm open to suggestions :)
 
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If they are not off the same fuse it will not work.

you could prove this by moving the upstairs unit to a socket on the downstairs system and see if it works there.

there should be a reference to this in the instructions. It is mentioned in BOLD in the instructions for my system.

DG
 

Growltiger

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If they are not off the same fuse it will not work.

you could prove this by moving the upstairs unit to a socket on the downstairs system and see if it works there.

there should be a reference to this in the instructions. It is mentioned in BOLD in the instructions for my system.

DG
This just isn't so. Perhaps part of the confusion is your use of the names of things.

In the instructions you say it mentions a fuse. Nowadays there are no fuses except the main fuse, usually by the meter. So perhaps they are effectively saying they have to be on the same meter, which is correct and makes sense.

So let's get the names clear.
You have a main distribution board. This has a master circuit breaker.

On the board there are multiple circuits. Each of the circuits has a small circuit breaker, commonly called a trip. (This is what long ago used to be a circuit fuse).
There is also a main fuse, for the whole lot, usually by the meter, this could be 100A for example. You don't touch that one ever!

On every system I have installed the powerline units are on the same distribution board and different circuits.
If they always had to be on the same circuit they would be pretty much useless.

It is sometimes possible to communicate even between distribution boards (large houses can have several distribution boards), but usually not if they are on different meters.
However even that could be possible sometimes (in theory), and that is why some services allow you to set an encryption key for each pair, to prevent your neighbour spying on your data.
 
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Growltiger

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The two power sockets are indeed on the same circuit breaker but not on the same fuse. I'm pretty sure that wouldn't be allowed to have the power sockets from different floors on one fuse.
I'm in Belgium by the way, our house was built in 1992.

I have the kind with the pass-through power and with wifi. The connection is definitely established between the two units but the resulting speed upstairs is abnormally low. Not better than without the power line adapters/
Today I checked upstairs for any interfering networks but there aren't any. I tried connecting to the 2.4 GHz network. It was possible but the resulting internet speed was even worse.

So, I seem to remain with two options:
1. have a part of the panel removed to be able to plug the adapter directly in the wall socket. The panel is the backside from a large wall unit that cannot be moved by us - really heavy and with heavy gliding doors. The whole had to be lined out carefully by the people that installed this.
There are two sockets behind the panel and while there is plenty of room in a recess to handle and hold the power plugs, not so for the adapter. I don't have the tools to remove an extra part of that panel. I'll need to have someone do that with the chance that afterwards, the issue wouldn't be solved anyway. Small chance though, I suppose? @Growltiger any idea on what relative speed using a network cable for connection could be expected afterwards? 100% of the maximum available speed, 75%, 50% ?
2. Identify and solve the reason why the original configuration with the netgear r8500 access point doesn't work anymore as it did for some four years up till the last weeks.
Nothing seems to have changed in that period and there still isn't any interference from other networks.
I suppose a component of the radio on the router could be defective causing it to be far less effective. This seems to correspond with the findings so far.
This option would then mean to replace the router and see if I get everything back to the way it was before. With the chance that the replacing device doesn't solve this either.
Over here we have a fortnight to return goods bought online, no questions asked.

Dilemma and I'm open to suggestions :)

1. Powerline
I didn't know you have units with power passthrough. That's great news. you can plug them into the wall once you get access to the power sockets.

You should carry out a test before doing any work on the heavy wall unit. To do a test you need to plug the powerline unit into the nearest socket that you can plug it into. All you need to do then is connect it to the access point with a long ethernet cable (buy one if you don't have one). I think you will probably get 100 to 200Mb/s as your picture shows it is limited to 223Mb/s (which is quite slow, TP-Link have much faster units).

2. Wifi
Have you actually measured the wifi channels upstairs? The router downstairs can have no idea what is happening upstairs. Use inSSIDer like I said. Then you can set the channels manually if you need to.
I doubt the router is faulty since you said that it works fine to another room upstairs? Anyway you can test the router by taking the machine upstairs downstairs and trying it there.
If it still doesn't work well it could be that machine, not the router.

If you have a laptop you should walk around the house trying it everywhere. And if you use inSSIDer on it you will see exactly what is happening.
Until you do a proper wifi analysis like I said you will always be in the dark.

3. Ethernet
The best solution of all is to rip the house apart and install ethernet cables from the location of the modem to every room, using CAT6 cables and wall sockets. Put a 16 port gigabit ethernet switch connecting them all together at the centre by the modem. Then you can have gigabit speeds everywhere. And you can add wifi access points whereever you need them. This is basically what I did when I did a big building project on my house. It is also a really good idea when building a house, as it is so cheap and easy at that stage.
I know this isn't practical in most cases, but I mention it in case anyone reading this is about to remodel their house or build a new one.
 
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1. Powerline
I didn't know you have units with power passthrough. That's great news. you can plug them into the wall once you get access to the power sockets.

You should carry out a test before doing any work on the heavy wall unit. To do a test you need to plug the powerline unit into the nearest socket that you can plug it into. All you need to do then is connect it to the access point with a long ethernet cable (buy one if you don't have one). I think you will probably get 100 to 200Mb/s as your picture shows it is limited to 223Mb/s (which is quite slow, TP-Link have much faster units).

2. Wifi
Have you actually measured the wifi channels upstairs? The router downstairs can have no idea what is happening upstairs. Use inSSIDer like I said. Then you can set the channels manually if you need to.
I doubt the router is faulty since you said that it works fine to another room upstairs? Anyway you can test the router by taking the machine upstairs downstairs and trying it there.
If it still doesn't work well it could be that machine, not the router.

If you have a laptop you should walk around the house trying it everywhere. And if you use inSSIDer on it you will see exactly what is happening.
Until you do a proper wifi analysis like I said you will always be in the dark.

3. Ethernet
The best solution of all is to rip the house apart and install ethernet cables from the location of the modem to every room, using CAT6 cables and wall sockets. Put a 16 port gigabit ethernet switch connecting them all together at the centre by the modem. Then you can have gigabit speeds everywhere. And you can add wifi access points whereever you need them. This is basically what I did when I did a big building project. It is also a really good idea when building a house, as it is so cheap and easy at that stage.
I know this isn't practical in most cases, but I mention it in case anyone reading this is about to remodel their house or build a new one.
That speed of 223 Mb/s is in itself strange: the product sheet states the device is capable of much more:

Devolo_Magic_2_WiFi_Next_Multiroom_Kit_-_Coolblue_-_Before_23_59__delivered_tomorrow.jpg
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I plugged the adapter in a free socket and connected to the cable modem. I have a long network cable available. Excellent idea.

This resulted in a better speed upstairs, in the chamber with the other adapter. Strangely the speedtest with the cable resulted in a lower speed than with wifi: about 165 versus over 200 Mb/s

I installed the inssider tool on my work laptop. I followed the signal from the netgear r8500 router. the results of the signal strength of this tool were consistent with those from the android tool and with the speedtests I did earlier:
lowest signal of around -70 in the upstairs room furthest away, around -55 in the upstairs room just above the r8500 and around -40 in the downstairs room with the r8500.
For the network from the power line adaptor with wifi, two radios are in the picture: the one from the cable modem downstairs (-40) and the one from the power line adapter upstairs (-80). In the upstairs room above the cable modem, the radios were about equal in strength: -61 from the cable modem and -58 from the power line adapter. The connection remained on the one from the cable modem.
In the upstairs room furthest from the cable modem and with the power line adapter, the situation was reversed: -35 for the power line adapter and -80 for the cable modem. The connection had switched to the power line adapter. As expected.
Speedtest on this laptop from work: around 180 to 200 Mb/s.
On the macbook, 205 to 235 Mb/s

Conclusion is a clear improvement with the adapter downstairs directly in the power socket.
Mystery 1: why not more when the product sheet gives a maximum of 1Gb/s
Mystery 2: whatever happened to the netgear r8500 that the signal upstairs diminished so much in the past weeks.

Your remark about having Ethernet cabling throughout the house is absolutely correct. If we were to start again, this would definitely be in the plans.

And many thanks already for your help, Richard!
 

Growltiger

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I'm very happy that it is now working much better.

I can answer Mystery 1. The spec means that the chip supports gigabit ethernet (1000Mb/s) and not just fast ethernet (100Mb/s). It is not saying that you will get a certain speed.
I will add Mystery 3. The spec says Maximum ethernet speed 2400 Mb/s. I cannot understand what it means (it seems impossible) unless they added an extra zero and it is supposed to say 240 Mb/s. This would explain the speeds you are getting.

I don't know if you are in time to send it back, but I would return the powerline adapter and get one that supports at least 600Mb/s and preferably 1000 Mb/s, TP-Link have them. It is a shame that you have a wonderful 1000 Mb/s coming into the house and then a lot of that speed is wasted.
 
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An update:
In short, I sent these back.
I contacted the support and they had nothing more to offer than what we already tried.
I had the units setup in the best possible settings and stil no luck. I switched the two receiving units to rule out one was defective but no change.

Next I ordered an update for the access point that worked without issues before.
Upstairs, the internetspeed was still a lot less than it had been on the macbook.
Imagine my surprise when I checked on the ipad I took along for the app for the access point: the internetspeed on that device was definitely as expected.
The ipad and the macbook use the same wifi protocol.
I suppose something is wrong with the macbook, the wifi antenna perhaps.
I found some postings online of people experiencing something simmilar.
I also have an issue now with my wifes work laptop but I will make a new post for that.
 
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Jun 2, 2010
Messages
749
Location
Pacific Wonderland
The spec says Maximum ethernet speed 2400 Mb/s.

I bet that's a poor translation of the maximum backplane throughput.
I had a friend who kept calling her provider bitching about WiFi speed.
I went to her house and looked in her fancy "wiring closet" only to find a first generation router behind the cable modem -- it's backplane was limited to 48MBPS which severely capped her performance.
That was probably a fine number when everyone was running 10mbit Ethernet -- but way outdated and not obvious.....it had 10/100 ports and was connecting at 100, just didn't have the BW to serve them.
 

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