High Noon at the office (B&W)

Discussion in 'Landscapes, Architecture, and Cityscapes' started by J.Alan, Apr 4, 2007.

  1. There is a photo contest at work, which is looking for images of the business campus. The strong geometric lines of this scene caught my attention as I got back from lunch, today. I took a few quick snaps and in processing, converted it to grayscale, which I think does it a lot of justice.

    I want to also share it here for fun and comment. Hope you like it.

    original.
     
  2. Now THAT is cool, Joe! I love the way you composed this, the lines and shapes....the B&W treatment is perfect for this image!
     
  3. Thanks, Connie!

    It screamed at me to shoot it, so I did. The color version is rather uninteresting.
     
  4. biggstr6

    biggstr6

    Apr 26, 2005
    Richmond,Va
    I like it Joe. I agree ,alot of my shots of bldgs I prefer in B&W or sepia.
    seems to draw more attention to the forms ,texture, lines shadows ect... when you remove the color.
     
  5. excellent Joe!
     
  6. Bubba

    Bubba

    493
    Apr 12, 2005
    Alabama
    Mighty cool, Joe. I never did ask you, which place do you work for?
     
  7. Thanks, Biggs.

    Yes, many of these geometric and architectural shots do look better in non-color. It must be the shapes and contrast that attracts attention, not the color.
     
  8. Thanks, Dave.

    I appreciate the comment!
     
  9. Thanks, Bubba. In answer to your

    question, I'm a NASA rocket scientist! :biggrin:

    I say that a bit tongue-in-cheek. I'm actually an engineer, not a scientist. But, I am designing the next generation NASA human-rated launch vehicle at the Marshall Space Flight Center.
     
  10. Thanks, Vern! (nt)

    nt
     
  11. Bob Coutant

    Bob Coutant Moderator Moderator

    May 17, 2005
    Pleasantville Ohio
    Right on -- it's all about shapes, lines and contrast. In fact, with this one, I'd be tempted to push the contrast further so as to emphasize the shapes and lines formed by the shadows.
     
  12. Bob, thanks for

    your reply and critique. I had toyed with boosting the contrast, and could not decide which I liked better. I increased the contrast and lost a little detail in the darker areas, and decided to go with what I presented. However, I can see the attraction to more contrast.

    Too late for my submission ... already sent.
     
  13. Bob Coutant

    Bob Coutant Moderator Moderator

    May 17, 2005
    Pleasantville Ohio
    Yes, there is always the danger of concealing something that you'd like to be seen. As with most things, it's a matter of compromise and deciding what works best for you. [Also, some methods are better than others for this sort of thing.]
     
  14. That is a winner! Love it.
     
  15. Marie, I hope

    you are right! Thanks.
     
  16. Bubba

    Bubba

    493
    Apr 12, 2005
    Alabama
    COOL! I was thinking NASA but wasn't sure. My mother-in-law works for NASA but she just handles the money for the engineers :)
     
  17. Commodorefirst

    Commodorefirst Admin/Moderator Administrator

    May 1, 2005
    Missouri
    Nicely Done Joe, wish I had captured that image! I really like it and the lines.

    I tend to like having a pure black somewhere in the image, so I will probably tend to side with having just a tiny bit more black, someitmes adjusting just the midrange down to .9 can give more without loosing to much details.

    Regardless, great submission! And you are the one who has to be happy with the image!

    PM sent

    Wade
     

  18. Oooh, does it show that much ??? :smile:
     
  19. Thanks, Wade! PM

    replied to.
     
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