Share How do you close the shutter curtain on the Z7ii

Joined
Sep 7, 2021
Messages
2
Hi, I have been reading up on my new Nikon Z7ii mirrorless camera but have been unable to find out how to close the shutter curtain while I change lenses. I have read the manual and looked in a Nikon book but see no mention of it. Currently, when I swap out lenses the sensor is right there - exposed. During events like a football game or other outdoor activity, it has caused the sensor to get dust and water drops on the sensor. There must be a way to activate and close the shutter curtain so that the sensor is protected during a lens swapping session. How do you close the shutter curtain so when you remove the lens the sensor is covered vs exposed?
 
Joined
Sep 7, 2021
Messages
2
Wow - thanks - I thought I was just stupid. Nikon really needs to provide a better - faster way to do this. I swap out lenses at sporting events. Super-tele when the action is way down the field. But as the action moves closer to my position I will freq swap out the super-tel for a smaller zoom. This means I am sometimes swapping lenses 5 to 10 times in a football game. Seems like a slow and cluggie way. But I have gotten a lot of junk on the image sensor and that is a HUGE pain when it happens. So for now I will do this - but very strange that Nikon did not see this as something people would want to do?
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
25,771
Location
SW Virginia
Seems like a slow and cluggie way.

I agree, and I had never heard of that procedure. Strikes me as a bit risky to pull the battery out while the camera is turned on. And I didn't see any mention of turning the camera off before reinserting the battery, which I think would be a good precaution.

Over the years I've mastered a technique for lens changes which leaves the camera open for only a second or two.
 
Joined
May 1, 2005
Messages
12,528
Location
Thunder Bay Ontario Canada
In the field it may be too cumbersome, but if I were changing lenses for a static shoot indoors I might try this- it's not as if I had to change lenses quickly . Better to take some time than to have to deal with sensor cleaning afterwards in my opinion. But I agree, is this something that Nikon could take a look at? Is it possible with a firmware upgrade?
 
I think something like this requires more than a firmware update. Nikon may make it possible and more convenient with the new Z9; it is something that is a new feature on Sony's new A1, but which isn't available on the earlier models. Nikon well may follow suit. In the A1 there is a specific setting to implement it, but I haven't actually tried it yet -- still busy tweaking other settings.
 
Joined
Aug 30, 2021
Messages
163
Location
Idaho
Real Name
Dan
I hate changing lenses on my Z7 in the field. This was a major reason for my decision to buy the trinity of Z lenses, so that I would change lenses fewer times. When changing lenses, I try to hold my camera with the sensor pointing down and blow it with a bulb blower. That has reduced the amount of crud that I accumulate.

I have not noticed this much crud sticking to my sensors in m43 or Fuji cameras that I've been using since 2013. I don't know if this is a function of a higher resolution sensor that shows the dust more in the final image, or if there is something about the Nikons that attracts more dust.

I saw on the rumored specs for the Z9 that there will be a shutter that will close over the sensor whenever the lens is removed from the body. That would be a great technology to move on to all the other Z bodies in the future.
 
In his excellent Configuring the Sony A1 Camera, Thom Hogan points out that while this new feature setting (which is found in the same section as the setting for the Antidust function on the Sony) may be convenient and prevent dust from accumulating on the sensor it also presents the possibility of damaging the shutter if one accidentally touches it while handling the camera without a lens on it and the shutter is in closed position. For years I have routinely used the good old rocket blower and probably will continue to do so. I do most of my lens swapping indoors, rather than outdoors, anyway.
 
Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
2,011
Location
Central Ohio
Real Name
Andrew
I would not do the battery pull technique. You are putting the camera in a state that it was not intended to be in. Knowing how Nikon is now, if something were to happen, I can see them stating that they would not cover a shutter repair under warranty.

I’ve had the Z6 since release and have needed to clean the sensor a total of 2 times.

It would be nice to have something block the sensor during lens changes, but that does not exist in the current cameras. It’s not like we didn’t have an opportunity to ask and research this fact before purchase.

I honestly find that I got a way dirtier sensor in a DSLR because of the mirror flapping about and moving dust within the camera body around while moving about.

But, hey what do I know. Just my opinion take it or leave it for what it’s worth - free and easy.
 
Joined
May 1, 2005
Messages
12,528
Location
Thunder Bay Ontario Canada
In his excellent Configuring the Sony A1 Camera, Thom Hogan points out that while this new feature setting (which is found in the same section as the setting for the Antidust function on the Sony) may be convenient and prevent dust from accumulating on the sensor it also presents the possibility of damaging the shutter if one accidentally touches it while handling the camera without a lens on it and the shutter is in closed position. For years I have routinely used the good old rocket blower and probably will continue to do so. I do most of my lens swapping indoors, rather than outdoors, anyway.
I do as well, swap indoors, and that's been a source of dust on my sensor ++ despite very careful and regular use of Rocket blower. When outdoors, I've tried to minimize exposure to dust through practiced rapid exchange of lenses. Still dust accumulates....though if I only shot wide open it would not be as obvious.
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2005
Messages
30,597
Location
Moscow, Idaho
In his excellent Configuring the Sony A1 Camera, Thom Hogan points out that while this new feature setting (which is found in the same section as the setting for the Antidust function on the Sony) may be convenient and prevent dust from accumulating on the sensor it also presents the possibility of damaging the shutter if one accidentally touches it while handling the camera without a lens on it and the shutter is in closed position. For years I have routinely used the good old rocket blower and probably will continue to do so. I do most of my lens swapping indoors, rather than outdoors, anyway.
Exactly!
It's like a kid sticking a pencil, or a finger, in the moving blades of a fan!

I rely on the face-down-body approach (the camera's, not mine) and except for a day at the Oregon coast I have done OK. A blower and the built in sensor shaker do me well. I use an Orbit blower that has a built in HEPA filter and other dust abating goodies.
https://www.pictureline.com/products/photographic-solutions-orbit-blower
 
Joined
May 1, 2005
Messages
12,528
Location
Thunder Bay Ontario Canada
I would not do the battery pull technique. You are putting the camera in a state that it was not intended to be in. Knowing how Nikon is now, if something were to happen, I can see them stating that they would not cover a shutter repair under warranty.

I’ve had the Z6 since release and have needed to clean the sensor a total of 2 times.

It would be nice to have something block the sensor during lens changes, but that does not exist in the current cameras. It’s not like we didn’t have an opportunity to ask and research this fact before purchase.

I honestly find that I got a way dirtier sensor in a DSLR because of the mirror flapping about and moving dust within the camera body around while moving about.

But, hey what do I know. Just my opinion take it or leave it for what it’s worth - free and easy.
Now you've given my cause to be y of using this battery pull technique. I used to clean my cameras' sensors on my own. But my last couple of attempts, were pretty sloppy, ( getting older ) so I'll for now leave the sensor cleaning to reliable and proficient professionals
 
Joined
May 1, 2005
Messages
12,528
Location
Thunder Bay Ontario Canada
Exactly!
It's like a kid sticking a pencil, or a finger, in the moving blades of a fan!

I rely on the face-down-body approach (the camera's, not mine) and except for a day at the Oregon coast I have done OK. A blower and the built in sensor shaker do me well. I use an Orbit blower that has a built in HEPA filter and other dust abating goodies.
https://www.pictureline.com/products/photographic-solutions-orbit-blower
I use the same technique: blower with built in filter, in camera sensor cleaner, face down exchanges. but still....sensor dust became very apparent when I stopped down to f16 to f 22 for macros otherwise I would have thought my methods were keeping the sensor clean.
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2005
Messages
30,597
Location
Moscow, Idaho
I use the same technique: blower with built in filter, in camera sensor cleaner, face down exchanges. but still....sensor dust became very apparent when I stopped down to f16 to f 22 for macros otherwise I would have thought my methods were keeping the sensor clean.
I no longer lose sleep over it as I rarely go to f/22 (famous last words, eh!) Dust is easy/easier to live with; ocean spray is another story altogether.
 
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
21,675
Location
Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
If I need to take the time to set up a still eg lighting, props etc, then using this method for me would not be a chore

That's an excellent point. When doing that kind of photography, I actually thrive on the slow, no-rush process that aims to get the details as right as practical. It's a process that can be used to the max only when photographing inanimate objects. Indeed, that slowness and attention to detail is quite relaxing for me. So, I wouldn't be bothered by this method of keeping the sensor clean if it's safe.
 
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
21,675
Location
Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
I no longer lose sleep over it as I rarely go to f/22

I've found that, for me, the need for keeping a clean sensor has less to do with how often I shoot at small apertures and more to do with whether there are relatively large, plain areas in the scene. Fortunately, those areas are really easy to correct during post-processing whether I'm attending to a plain sky or a plain background when doing tabletop photography.

My biggest problem when doing drop art photography is that it's nearly impossible to know by viewing the photograph whether the problem is caused by something on the sensor or droplets of liquid that have splashed onto the background material; I have to check the sensor more often than normal to determine if it needs to be cleaned. Similarly, when doing traditional tabletop photography that involves a plain background, sometimes the background material is flawed or has become scratched or even dirty over time.
 
Last edited:
Joined
May 1, 2005
Messages
12,528
Location
Thunder Bay Ontario Canada
All is good. the rumoured spec release for the Z9 is that it has a capability to close off the shutter to allow for lens changing...that and Nikon supposedly claiming that it is a combination of the D6 and 850 and is better than the D6...hmmm....D6 goes? or Z7II goes?
 

Latest threads

Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Nikon Cafe is a fan site and not associated with Nikon Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Forum GIFs powered by GIPHY: https://giphy.com/
Copyright © Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom