How many of us caliberate our monitors ?

How many of us caliberate our monitors regularly ?

  • Yes, regularly

    Votes: 120 74.1%
  • Never

    Votes: 42 25.9%

  • Total voters
    162
Joined
May 7, 2005
Messages
336
Location
Warsaw, Poland
It has been grilled in my head right from the days of the D100 that it is imperative to caliberate your monitors be it the desktop or the laptop. I invested in a Spyder pro at the onset and later upgraded to a Eye One and havent looked back with regular caliberations on all my monitors.
But sometimes I wonder if I am overdoing it ? Photographers who I meet casually give me wide eyed looks when I ask them how they caliberate their monitors. Maybe I am asking the wrong people, but would like to know from colleagues here if it is still the right way to go and a necessity. I am sure a voting thread would give some light to this question to.
 
Joined
Jul 30, 2006
Messages
11,635
Location
Southern California
Yup, I do... but I have to deliver for the client... For me it's about having the control from start to finish. I could have Mpix color correct for me, but I'd rather do it myself.

(PS- turn this thread into a poll for a more exact count :wink:)
 

JPS

Joined
May 7, 2005
Messages
9,284
Location
North-East of Brazil
We ALL should calibrate our monitor if we want to have consistant and "true" colors ! Period !

.....the main problem is that when you "export" your images into a client or a friend's computer, many chances are that HIS monitor will not be calibrated, or if it is, certainly not the same way as yours is :frown: !

:wink:
J-P.
 
Joined
May 7, 2005
Messages
200
Location
Little Rock, Arkansas
I'm currently using the Spyder Express 2, hope to get the Spyder Elite 3 eventually. We all should be calibrating to get colors right on the screen as a first step - the xrite color checker Passport is also a great help to getting the colors correct in post processing for different situations. I just do this as a hobby but need all the help I can get to getting the results I want from photography, if my photos don't look right to me how can I expect them to look right to others - either in prints or on screen.
 
Joined
Jan 9, 2011
Messages
3,019
Location
Iowa
Have never calibrated mine. & I'm guessing 99% of the people that view my images over the net. Are using non calibrated monitors also.
 
Joined
Nov 2, 2008
Messages
1,196
Location
Halifax, NS
Never here. I haven't had a pic yet when after looking at it on the monitor the colours looked off to me. I'm sure they are off a little bit, but for my hobbiest uses it doesn't really matter as long as they are close.
 
Joined
Mar 16, 2008
Messages
1,988
Location
Oregon
If you sell prints, monitor calibration is only the first step in getting it right. Color management is quite complicated, and goes much deeper than just calibrating your monitor. There was a photo in a non photography forum recently where the guy posted a product photo with a white background. Problem is, the background looked pink to everyone except the OP. His problem was probably more with WB in the camera, but he could not see the pink on his monitor.

If you don’t sell prints, it might not be that big of a deal, and for the majority of people with digital cameras, no matter what kind, it isn’t that important. Good quality monitors these days are pretty good without calibrating for viewing images on the screen and sharing images via the web.

For the pro, monitor calibration is very important, but is only the first step in color management.

EDIT: Good Grief. I didn't realize how old this thread was till after I posted. :redface:
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2010
Messages
371
Location
Atlanta, GA
I used to. Then I looked at a bunch of my pictures on family member's computers and saw how bad they looked. What good does it do me to have perfectly calibrated pictures that only look good if all my friends and family calibrate their monitors as well? Now I process most of my web pictures for bad monitors. My prints get soft proofed. (And I do use an IPS monitor, of course.)
 
Joined
Aug 6, 2006
Messages
540
Location
Pacific NW
I used to. Then I looked at a bunch of my pictures on family member's computers and saw how bad they looked. What good does it do me to have perfectly calibrated pictures that only look good if all my friends and family calibrate their monitors as well? Now I process most of my web pictures for bad monitors. My prints get soft proofed. (And I do use an IPS monitor, of course.)

How do you process for bad monitors?
 
Joined
Jul 30, 2006
Messages
11,635
Location
Southern California
I used to. Then I looked at a bunch of my pictures on family member's computers and saw how bad they looked. What good does it do me to have perfectly calibrated pictures that only look good if all my friends and family calibrate their monitors as well? Now I process most of my web pictures for bad monitors. My prints get soft proofed. (And I do use an IPS monitor, of course.)

So. if I process my pictures on a bad, eg, uncalibrated monitor, and someone else views them on another bad, eg, uncalibrated monitor, what are the chances these pictures will look even half way decent? :rolleyes: At least if I process them on my calibrated monitor with the correct levels, they have a chance of looking decent of other people's monitors...and many browsers these days have support for proper color profiles (correct terminology???).
 
Joined
Jul 29, 2005
Messages
9,532
Location
Pittsburgh, Pa.
My color management is three steps.

1. Custom Camera profile using XRite ColorChecker Passport and the included Lightroom plug-in for RAW.
2. Monitor profile using XRite Color Munki
3. Printer profile using XRite Color Munki
Notice Profile is in each step. Profiles are the key to accurate color. All print labs use profiles, so labs also match.

The Passport is easy to use, easier than preset WB. Using it in Lightroom speeds the editing process and gives accurate color.

I'm not associated with XRite. I'm just sharing a workflow that works well and quickly.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Joined
Jan 29, 2010
Messages
371
Location
Atlanta, GA
Simply put: bad monitors are over-bright and over-saturated, normally toward red. I adjust accordingly. I'm not talking about making my images look terrible on a calibrated monitor, I'm talking about recognizing that they're going to be a bit "brighter" on other people's monitors than my own.

It's not that there's anything wrong with calibration - it's that I've found it to be a waste of time when it comes to sharing images online for friends and family. Soft-proofing and knowing the weaknesses of their monitors has been more successful.
 
Joined
Jan 7, 2010
Messages
1,980
Location
Los Angeles
I don't yet, since I'm still mostly in "holiday snaps" mode, but when I get serious about this new fangled digital photography thing, then I will start doing regular monitor calibration. And if I do get a good color inkjet printer, then I'll probably want to calibrate it as well.
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2010
Messages
371
Location
Atlanta, GA
I don't yet, since I'm still mostly in "holiday snaps" mode, but when I get serious about this new fangled digital photography thing, then I will start doing regular monitor calibration. And if I do get a good color inkjet printer, then I'll probably want to calibrate it as well.

I just noticed that you have a lot of lenses and equipment to be in "holiday snaps" mode. :eek:
 
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