I’m looking at 55’ 4K TV

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from a CNET review:
if you do have a 4K TV, you will have to use your TV's built-in Netflix app (above) to see 4K content from them.

is that correct ?
 
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the picture improvement is like B&W to Color all over again. The remote is amazing, it has a pointer like a mouse. S/u was cake and I already had 4k Netflix. I'm streaming from the TV vs Fire. Next up is Spectrum (which I don't watch much on this TV)
 
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In my system, TV 75" Sony X940D, receiver , hd dvd players alll can access Netflix, Prime, YouTube and many more channels. At the time I ended up getting a HD Roku to access those streaming channels. Just felt that the decoding and ability of the Roku to present HD content would be better than the tv as that was it's purpose while the TV was to present a picture. Things may have changed now, don't know how robust the tv's internal decoders are.
 
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I like the Fire remote but the LG remote blows it away and that was the only reason I leaned towards streaming via Fire. Online reviews say it doesn't matter which except one review said for a 4k tv you needed to stream via the TV but I doubt that since my Fire Stick is 4k
 
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the picture improvement is like B&W to Color all over again. The remote is amazing, it has a pointer like a mouse. S/u was cake and I already had 4k Netflix. I'm streaming from the TV vs Fire. Next up is Spectrum (which I don't watch much on this TV)
Excellent! :)

The 1st time we were watching one of the hollywood awards shows, I commented to my wife how I could see the intricate detail of the performer’s gown.
 

Growltiger

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Since we're on the subject of TVs, though.....I have what is probably a silly or weird question. When people mount their TVs on a wall or above their fireplace mantel, don't they have to crick their necks in order to watch the darned thing? How comfortable can that be? I am not a fan of lying down while watching TV, I am always seated in a chair and I much prefer to have the viewing screen at least positioned at a level where I'm not having to look upward at the thing. Or does that monster size of these cinema-sized screens actually alleviate the need to crick one's neck since the TV is already so large and filling up a lot of visual space in a room anyway?
That is a really really good question.
I have even seen TV's mounted at the top of a wall next to the ceiling. Putting them above a fireplace is quite common.
You should not crick your nexk, and although it is possible to lie back with your head resting on something, it is far better to sit upright, and that means the TV should be roughly at eye level, so not far above the floor.
In many rooms the fireplace is the natural centre of attention, and that was great when everyone sat staring into a lovely log fire.
The problem is that architects who designed and perhaps still design house layouts, often don't think about having a fireplace and a TV at floor level, so the only solution is to put the TV above the fireplace.
I once came up with a wonderful solution, which is to excavate a deep trench in front of the fireplace and have a TV that vanishes under the house when not in use. Sadly this isn't practical. And if the fire was burning the TV would catch fire.

When the architect designed the house I'm in right now, we worked with him to solve the problem in quite a small room. The solution was to have the TV in an open bookcase to the right of the (double-sided) fire, and concealed channels for the cables to the speakers. I just took a quick photo with my phone and you can see we just managed to squeeze in speakers on the left, the fire which is burning logs as the cold wind is currently 60mph, log store below, the TV and audio equipment on the right. It took a lot of careful measurement. The TV is only 42 inch as the viewing distance is quite short. It is wall mounted on a swivel so can be pulled in or out and the angle adjusted,

20201205_184314 - 1600.jpg
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BTW Randy, this is a photography site—we best see some pics of the new toy soon, or else . . . . :watching:
the 2 tv's in the back are give aways and i just gave away another 55. We sold our mountain house and had 2 extra from there. We sold the house last October TG w/ Covid and my health it was great timing

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Do any of these "smart" TVs allow streaming from any internet source? Other than sports we primarily watch operas from the Metropolitan Opera and concerts of the Berlin Philharmonic from their websites, which I stream from my MacBook Pro to an early-generation Apple TV device.
Our Samsung tv has a built in web browser. It's kind of clunky to use, but we have used it occasionally. We have a 4K apple tv attached to the Samsung that we usually airplay to. It is more convenient than using the built in web browser.
 
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That is a really really good question.
I have even seen TV's mounted at the top of a wall next to the ceiling. Putting them above a fireplace is quite common.
You should not crick your nexk, and although it is possible to lie back with your head resting on something, it is far better to sit upright, and that means the TV should be roughly at eye level, so not far above the floor.
In many rooms the fireplace is the natural centre of attention, and that was great when everyone sat staring into a lovely log fire.
The problem is that architects who designed and perhaps still design house layouts, often don't think about having a fireplace and a TV at floor level, so the only solution is to put the TV above the fireplace.
I once came up with a wonderful solution, which is to excavate a deep trench in front of the fireplace and have a TV that vanishes under the house when not in use. Sadly this isn't practical. And if the fire was burning the TV would catch fire.

When the architect designed the house I'm in right now, we worked with him to solve the problem in quite a small room. The solution was to have the TV in an open bookcase to the right of the (double-sided) fire, and concealed channels for the cables to the speakers. I just took a quick photo with my phone and you can see we just managed to squeeze in speakers on the left, the fire which is burning logs as the cold wind is currently 60mph, log store below, the TV and audio equipment on the right. It took a lot of careful measurement. The TV is only 42 inch as the viewing distance is quite short. It is wall mounted on a swivel so can be pulled in or out and the angle adjusted,

View attachment 1674987
What a pretty setup!!
 
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I'd love one of these 65 inch OLED TV's....


However, I have a 15 year old 50 inch Panasonic Elite. Damn thing refuses to die...

Oh well...:)

Good luck with your search Randy.
Ronnie
 
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I'd love one of these 65 inch OLED TV's.... However, I have a 15 year old 50 inch Panasonic Elite. Damn thing refuses to die... Oh well...:)
Before I got my LG OLED 65" in 2016, I had a 10 or so year old projection TV, 61", last of them with good LED lamps. It worked perfectly, but was just old tech, and I wanted 4K. Rather than trashing it or trying to sell it for next to nothing, I stripped the electronics down to parts and sold them on eBay, totaled $275 profit when done.
 
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It's not too big .... too small:

TV Screen size, Viewing distance range for 4K.
40", 3.3-5 feet.
43", 3.6-5.4 feet.
50", 4.2-6.3 feet.
55", 4.6-6.9 feet.
60", 5-7.5 feet.
65", 5.4-8.1 feet.
70", 5.8-8.75 ...

Obviously less for 1080P.
8K is only going to make this worse.

Based on vision acuity to resolve a pixel at distance......"HUMAN FACTORS"
 

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