I hear voices... my lenses talk to me...

Discussion in 'Lens Lust' started by Uncle Frank, Jun 30, 2005.

  1. Every child of the '60s knows that crystal has mystical properties. Well each of my lenses has its own character, and effects my photographic style and mood in different ways.

    The Beast (28-70/2.8 ) is an event lens, quick to focus and optimized to catch people in motion. Just putting it on the camera energizes me, and makes me want to find a party.

    42615095.

    The 80-200/2.8 has enough reach to let me enter Mother Nature's realm. Whenever it's mounted, I feel a restless urge to seek the company of the creatures of the the woods and streams.

    View attachment 11336

    There's a sense of tranquility about my 60mm micro. It lures me into an inner world, and reveals beauty that would otherwise escape my eye. It counsels me to be patient, and whispers,

    put the camera on tripod... look for the flattering perspective... find the favorable light... and only when all the stars are aligned... capture the image

    The 60 micro soothes my soul.

    View attachment 11337
     
  2. Great stuff Frank......you're a true poet.
     
  3. JordanLFW

    JordanLFW Guest

    agreed...and it was a helpful and to-the-point guide to the three lenses.
     
  4. Thanks, Scott and Jordan.

    You know the strange thing? My 20/2.8 doesn't talk to me. Maybe we don't know each other well enough yet...

    or maybe I'm just going crazy :shock:.
     
  5. You've got the gift and you definitely got the lens Frank.

    Just need to put a 20mm in your line-up as your landscapes glass and you're done mate ;-)

    ...and you do have great landscapes over there... just think ...wide, ya know... :lol:

    I would suggest you get a 12-24 but... not in your age... :p
     
  6. Chris101

    Chris101

    Feb 2, 2005
    Arizona
    The only lenses I have that speak to me are my 35mm f/2 and 180mm f/2.8. The 60, 85 and zoom sisters (yeah, my lenses are chicks - go figure) are just there to work.

    Oh yeah, I keep forgetting my 400 manual everything. This old fart lens wants to have a relationship, but she's just too complicated, wants too much attention, and isn't fast enough.

    Unlike your's my 60mm micro is the most aloof lens I have. And I don't know my 85 well enough yet, but there's possibilities there.

    Panos. It's in our advanced years that 12-24s are best! I'm hoping mine will start looking better when I'm as old as Frank. :twisted:
     
  7. It's clear from your comments that you are crazy as a loon.

    Everyone knows lenses are guys.
     
  8. That was my plan, but The Beast was highly insulted, and argued that it didn't need any help at the wide end. I asked it
    for proof, and it came up with this trio of 28mm images.

    44519075.
    View attachment 11339
    View attachment 11340
     
  9. Interesting observations, Frank, and very well stated.

    As I mentioned to you earlier, I'm somewhat on the other end of the spectrum as regards the lens that makes me slow down and become introspective. The 17-55 almost turns me into a snapshooter. I am to the point with that one I can just aim and fire it knowing it will make a properly exposed and sharp image but I get very lazy with composition and the images are often -- well, snapshots. On the other hand, the 70-200VR makes me slow down and check every minute detail of the frame before firing the shot. Often I won't shoot choosing instead to move a bit for a better angle or perspective. Part of that (maybe a large part) might be because I know if I do my part, the big VR will produce a knockout shot. The 85/1.4 is quickly gaining ground in that respect and will probably cause me to work even harder for the shot because it is a prime but more so because it is a killer lens.

    Phil
     
  10. Chris101

    Chris101

    Feb 2, 2005
    Arizona
    That's a vicious internet rumor.

    As for the gender of my lenses... I admire and lust after their glass curves, I love just to look at (through) them, they seem simple - yet are always revealing more and more complexity, not to mention the way that I touch them: I cradle them, gently searching for just the right spot. I crave the feel of the lens in my hand, filling it with just the perfect balance of mass and buoyancy. And when they speak to me, it is with the clear high tones of light.

    Don't know about you, but I'm not like that with guys.
     
  11. JeffKohn

    JeffKohn

    Apr 21, 2005
    Houston, TX
    I'm going to have to side with Chris with this one, lenses are definitely female (at least, mine are).

    I like your shots though Frank, even if they were taken with gender-confused glass.

    :)
     
  12. Is it just me, or is it getting warm in here? :oops:
     
  13. I think it's time to send the children from the room. :?

    Brian
     
  14. Frank, I insist... a 20mm is a 20mm
    original.
    ... :-D
     
  15. Nice example, Panos. It'll show better if you level the horizon, and crop it so the dividing line between sky and trees isn't dead middle of the frame.
     
  16. Now I understand. I always wondered where all these eerie voices come from :lol:

    UF, The Beast does really well in your hands. I have as yet to produce such crisp landscape shots with that lens.

    Cheers
     
  17. Thanks, Harry! The Beast is willing to do a scape or two to keep its rival, the 20/2.8, off my camera, but it really prefers scenery like this.

    original.
     
  18. Thanks for this lesson in proper treatment of The Beast. Now I start to comprehend why my wife permanently pushes me to sell it. Maybe she knows more than I do :lol:
     
  19. She has a point, Harry. The 70/80-200 series is great for people pics too, and it "disconnects" the photographer from the subject. The shorter working distance of The Beast forces you to interact with the model, which makes for intimate sessions. It's definitely safer to use the long lens when you have models like these young ladies ;).
     
  20. Guys, you're killing me! :lol:
     
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