Immature wintering eagles

Discussion in 'Birds' started by Lou Buscher, May 19, 2007.

  1. The winter is 2006 and I am along the Lackawaxen River in Pa. just where it runs into the Delaware River. Many young eagles come to places like this for their first and next winters as the Alewives (fish) are passed through a Hydro Electric plant and than run down river for the eagles to feast on. Besides the young birds many mature birds come also but it seems the young are their first and perhaps it’s due to their lack of skill in hunting that brings them to easy food. The amazing part is just how do they know how to go there? Do they have a language and are able to communicate with each other? Note the one has a red or orange like band plus a Federal band so this bird came a long way as I think this is the color used in Maine. Not sure 100% on the color. I have listened to mated pair’s talk back and forth to each other but will always wonder how these birds find places like this when food starts to get hard to find. (7 photos).
    Lou

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  2. WOW! Lou these are beautiful! I envy you and everyone else that lives close enough to photograph these lovelies! keep em comin, and I'll keep on droolin! :wink: :biggrin:
     
  3. Thank you Dianne. You must make the time to see and photograph these birds sometime in your life no matter what the cost. It will be worth it. Much magic will rub off and into that CF Card we all now have in our brain.
    Please let me add just one more I enjoyed watching that day.
    Lou

    504551460_224b2141fe_o.
     
  4. Still beautiful as always, Lou! I actually DID get an eagle last year - it was in AL. I'll never forget it! You need a magnifying glass to see it, BUT it IS a bald eagle! It was wild and free - that's what sticks in my mind! Thanks for posting more!

     
  5. Thanks Dianne and listen you should be able to get a group together in migration time for about a week off and do it. Rent a van and go to the Conowingo Dan in November or December and meet lots of good people but most of all lots of eagles. Motel rates are low at that time and with a group the cost of the van and gas will not be to bad and the rewards will be even better. Look here this is a part of a newsletter I just got last night by e-mail.
    Lou

    The Fish and Wildlife Service has announced results showing the largest population of breeding bald eagles in the U.S. since World War II. Bald eagles in the lower 48 states have climbed from an all-time low of 417 nesting pairs in 1963 to an estimated new high of 9,789 breeding pairs today.

    Also on my home page is a link called Americam bald eagle info go there and look up locations for the eagle. You can find one maybe even closer and I mean one with a lot of birds. www.loubuscher.com
     
  6. Gale

    Gale

    978
    Jan 26, 2005
    Viera Fl
    The immature Eagles are always great to see. The many different colors as they mature. They look golden in the right sun.
    I notice the bewildered look some of them have as wel..(or seem to have) :))))
    Fishing sequence is a really beautiful thing.
    Would love to catch that once:>))

    Thank you
     
  7. asaya

    asaya

    Aug 7, 2006
    Syracuse, NY
    Tony Saya
    Tremendous series Lou I have to get down your way one of these days
     
  8. Thanks Gale and you know I remember that burst like it was yesterday.
    I had my 800mm on a Nikon D2H and off a wooden surveyors tripod I followed it right in its dive. I had about 7 photos in the burst but I liked these the best. I got several good fishing ones last winter at the Conowingo Dam only this time I was useing my Canon 500+a 1.4 on a 1dm2n (Very fast camera) like the D2H was.
    Lou
     
  9. Thanks Tony BTW how far are you from the Susquanna River. You might look into this river as it is huge. I go in the winter for a few days but at the dam in Maryland. Unbelievable amount of eagles there from Thanksgiving to about the end of Jan.
    Lou
     
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