Is Nikon discontinuing DX DSLRs?

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This is what Nikon states as its present strategy: "In the Imaging Products Business, the Group made efforts to expand sales of mid- to high-end products for the professional and hobbyist segments by launching the Z 7II and Z 6II, full-frame mirrorless cameras of new products in the Z series, and by expanding the product line-up of interchangeable lenses for mirrorless cameras. Nevertheless, unit sales of digital cameras overall fell amidst the shrinking market, resulting in decreased revenue and profits."
 
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In the Imaging Products Business, further restructuring was announced in November 2019 as we laid out a policy of cutting business costs* by ¥50.0 billion from the fiscal year ended March 31, 2019. While the market environment in this business is expected to grow harsher, we are committed to implementing and accelerating further restructuring measures to rebuild the Imaging Products Business and quickly achieve profitability in this business.

Overall • Cut ¥50.0 billion in business costs vs. FY2019/3 during Medium-Term Management Plan → Pulled forward execution and pursued larger cuts to turn profitable in early stage, given the harsh market environment.
Development • Further selection of product development; aggressively shift resources to growth areas → Continue focusing on mid-and high-end models, conducting communal designing and shifting resources, etc.
Sales • Drastically revise sales strategy, optimize sales companies; thoroughly improve efficiencies → Thoroughly reduce sales and marketing expenses by leveraging digital marketing. → Drastically rebuild global sales network in this fiscal year.
Production • Optimize site function and size → Utilize sites for other businesses, such as Precision Equipment, where demand is expected. → Optimize the number of staff at overseas sites by about 700 people. Continue to reduce fixed costs according to the decrease of production volume.
 
It appears that Sony might have discontinued their DSLRs, which sort of gives permission to other manufacturers to at least begin doing the same.
Sony discontinued their DSLRs a long time ago, actually.... I think at least more than a year ago. Once the mirrorless line really got going and they had plenty of lenses as well as camera bodies to offer which would suit many customers' budgets and needs, they stopped manufacturing the DSLRs and concentrated on the mirrorless cameras, both the full-frame and APS-C sizes as well as the models with the smaller 1" sensors.

ETA:

Looks as though this is indeed the case, and while Mike is correct in that this (official?) move is apparently recent, I, too, was not wrong in my perception that the DSLR ship had sailed from Sony a long time ago. From an article in Engadget on May 5th:

"After helping make mirrorless dominant, Sony appears to have quietly stopped selling its A-mount DSLR cameras. As first seen by SonyAlpha Rumors, the A68, A99 II and A77 II have been removed from Sony's website and are listed as "no longer available" from camera specialists B&H Photo Video. Sony hasn't directly confirmed the news, but Engadget has reached out for comment.

It's been pretty clear that Sony was no longer interested in making DSLRs (Sony's term is DSLT due to the fixed translucent mirrors), because the last model announced was the 42-megapixel A99 II way back in 2016. The only announcement of late was an adapter that would allow E-mount camera owners to use A-mount lenses."


I remember some years ago when I was just casually looking around and in the early stages of deciding where I wanted to go with my camera(s) and photography in the future, every time I read anything about Sony there was very little mention of their DSLT line and everything was primarily about the mirrorless bodies and lenses. I think the Sony mirrorless camera which really became a winner for them, the one which everyone wanted, was the A7III, which was released in 2018, and that probably sounded the death knell or the DSLTs. I remember when reading about the A-mount-to-E-mount adapter that the thought went through my mind, "gee, does anyone even buy the A-mount cameras and lenses any more?"
 
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And I was waiting for the next camera after the D7500.
My D7200 is getting worn out, and will need to be replaced in a year or so.

I would suggest shopping for a good slightly used or refurbished D7200. I looked hard at the D7500 when It was announced and decided to stick with what I have. It's a great camera and I didn't see that the D7500 added anything useful.
 
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Nikon does not list DSLRs as an area of investment.
And Nikon does not list cameras as a long term growth business for them.
They now account for a substantial but ever decreasing 38% of revenues.
It’s all on their investors page.
 
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Nikon does not list cameras as a long term growth business for them.

I would be surprised to learn that any manufacturer of stand-alone, handheld cameras would consider that segment of the market to be a long-term growth business unless maybe it's truly a niche business. Even so, there are lots and lots of businesses that aren't long-term growth businesses that generate enough profits to make them attractive businesses.
 
I think that probably many people, once they have tried a mirrorless camera, become hooked and so are no longer interested in DSLRs. Also probably many who might be just starting out are encouraged to go with mirrorless right from the get-go because it is "the current Thing and the Wave of the Future." I know that a friend not too long ago was interested in getting into photography and she was particularly interested in getting a Nikon camera; I suggested that she check out both the DSLRs and the mirrorless offerings, but in the end, without really trying out anything first she simply went with some special deal a local Big Box store was offering and that was that. She DID get a good deal, and a nice beginning-level Nikon DSLR with two kit lenses and she's happy. That's what counts, of course.
 
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I think this article on Nikon Rumors basically sums up the limitations of mirrorless, especially for low light flash shots. Even though I'm an early adopter and proponent of mirrorless, there are still some limitations that can't be fixed due to the real-time live view. I've yet to see a mirrorless camera that's overcome that weakness.

Canon has done a good job implementing their DPAF system for DSLR live view, but Nikon only has one OSPDAF camera with the D780. I'm all for them putting effort into the Z bodies, but I do think Nikon should at least should have more "hybrid" style DSLRs to truly bridge the gap between the two formats.
 
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I would be surprised to learn that any manufacturer of stand-alone, handheld cameras would consider that segment of the market to be a long-term growth business unless maybe it's truly a niche business. Even so, there are lots and lots of businesses that aren't long-term growth businesses that generate enough profits to make them attractive businesses.
Absolutely.
It is nearly impossible to scale down manufacturing. Which is what sank Kodak.
A last man standing strategy is a viable one, HP is executing such a strategy with print.
It is a mix of constant cost reductions, buying market share in a declining market and increasing prices when possible.
It is very difficult to execute and is transitional.
It would be a lot easier for an upstart to build up scale. Which is difficult with cameras because of high barriers to entry (patents for example).
Scaling up and down is a lot easier in a digital world.
Nikon is very open about their future.
Journalists should not be guessing as most of Nikon’s plans are publicly available.
As well as the rationale behind their plans.
What are not available are the detailed roadmaps and prices, which Nikon only releases when the time is right.
 
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People wrote off vinyl records and turntables in the late 1980s. Now, Vinyl outsells CDs by quite a margin and there are more brands and models of turntables than ever before—especially at the high and ultra high end.
And before you wax poetic about streaming services, remember that streaming pays scant little to musicians. Musicians may soon be the extinct species!~
 
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