Is Nikon discontinuing DX DSLRs?

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Mar 25, 2011
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This is a very bad move, W T F is Nikon thinking????
They have some major issues, the cameras are not selling, and in their two other business areas they have to write down inventories due to COVID 19 (Healthcare and Precision Business).
https://www.nikon.com/news/2021/20210426_1_e.pdf

Imaging business is down -25% Year on Year despite the growth of Mirorless.
- Imaging Products: Record quarterly sales for mirrorless cameras. Deficit is shrank despite decline in revenue, thanks to improved product mix and reduced business cost. Segment was profitable in real terms, excluding factors such as restructuring relevant expenses.

https://www.nikon.com/about/ir/ir_library/result/pdf/2021/21third_all_e.pdf
Slide 16 shows what they are thinking.
They need to cut costs to push Mirorless, especially as they have identified that customers buy Mirorless FOR VIDEO capabilities.

THIS IS MAJOR for them, photo only customers are no longer the driving force for their business.
 
Joined
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MN, USA
This is a very bad move, W T F is Nikon thinking????
Public corporations have a legal fiduciary responsibility to their shareholders. That means that they are obligated to be profitable or at the very least present a plan to achieve profitability. Olympus right now is a case in point where their camera division was not profitable and they really saw no way to achieve that and ended up taking it off their corporate books.

People think that corporations like Nikon exist to make cameras - they don't. Nikon Corporation exists to make money - cameras are just (a part) of how they do that.
 
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Public corporations have a legal fiduciary responsibility to their shareholders. That means that they are obligated to be profitable or at the very least present a plan to achieve profitability. Olympus right now is a case in point where their camera division was not profitable and they really saw no way to achieve that and ended up taking it off their corporate books.

People think that corporations like Nikon exist to make cameras - they don't. Nikon Corporation exists to make money - cameras are just (a part) of how they do that.
Yet you don't make money if you do not listen to your customers and alienate them. Going from one "flavor of the month" to another is not the way to garner long term loyalty.
 
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Yet you don't make money if you do not listen to your customers and alienate them. Going from one "flavor of the month" to another is not the way to garner long term loyalty.
True but what Nikon has found is that its traditional customers are declining in numbers and revenues so quickly that they have to look for new business opportunities.
This is not a case of they are stopping DX and will miss sales, it is a case of they are producing cameras that people do not buy.
It is new customers that they need to find.
Existing ones do not generate enough revenues.
Japanese companies, and Nikon, don't do "flavour of the month", they have LTPs, long term plans which they review regularly and adjust.
 
Joined
May 3, 2007
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Colorado Springs, Colorado
Public corporations have a legal fiduciary responsibility to their shareholders. That means that they are obligated to be profitable or at the very least present a plan to achieve profitability. Olympus right now is a case in point where their camera division was not profitable and they really saw no way to achieve that and ended up taking it off their corporate books.

People think that corporations like Nikon exist to make cameras - they don't. Nikon Corporation exists to make money - cameras are just (a part) of how they do that.

Yet you don't make money if you do not listen to your customers and alienate them. Going from one "flavor of the month" to another is not the way to garner long term loyalty.

True but what Nikon has found is that its traditional customers are declining in numbers and revenues so quickly that they have to look for new business opportunities.
This is not a case of they are stopping DX and will miss sales, it is a case of they are producing cameras that people do not buy.
It is new customers that they need to find.
Existing ones do not generate enough revenues.
Japanese companies, and Nikon, don't do "flavour of the month", they have LTPs, long term plans which they review regularly and adjust.
Sooner or later we each come to the realization that we are no longer in this or that demographic for this or that product. It is a consequence of living long enough to outlive stuff.

An example outside of tech products: 4wd vehicles. I have a "newer" pickup truck, a 2015 Ram 1500. I also have a 2000 Chevy that I keep because I need at least one vehicle that accommodates tire chains. I don't know how far back you have to go to get a truck that can fit chains on the front but when I bought the Ram in 2015 there were none. How many people have this requirement? Not enough, apparently, to include it in modern instances of the half ton pickup. So, I must accept that I am a dinosaur and find another way to meet my need.

And as Jonathan noted in a previous reply, these sorts of needs are real but there simple aren't enough potential customers with the particular need to justify inclusion of the feature(s) in current production.
 
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Going from one "flavor of the month" to another is not the way to garner long term loyalty.

Going from one flavor of at least a decade to another of at least a decade is a way to both acquire new customers and retain previously established customer relationships. This, I believe, is what Nikon and its competitors are attempting to do.

A company never threatens its long-term customer loyalty by discontinuing products that neither its existing nor its potential customers are interested in buying.
 
One problem here is that Nikon was late getting into the mirrorless game so that it is now playing catch-up while other manufacturers are already marching along full-steam ahead. Yes, Nikon has lost customers -- some previously established long-term ones -- by its failure to have available the mirrorless camera bodies and lenses that have already been on store shelves in other manufacturers' lines. If a company doesn't have on offer what someone wants to purchase at the time he or she wants to obtain it, and it is available elsewhere, guess what happens? Right, the customer goes to the manufacturer which DOES have the desired product on hand. Now those previously long-term customers probably are not returning, even though Nikon may still be acquiring new customers starting out in photography for the first time and choosing to go mirrorless or retaining those long-term customers who were ready to make a gradual shift to mirrorless.
 
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Nikon may still be...retaining those long-term customers who were ready to make a gradual shift to mirrorless.

That sort of describes my profile, the exception being that I made an immediate shift rather than a gradual shift to mirrorless. Once I was ready to upgrade my camera system, most of the major manufacturers were offering both mirrorless and DSLR systems. I examined the available offerings in both types of systems among three sensor formats and determined that Nikon could provide everything I wanted least expensively because I could continue using two of my lenses, though one of them is only for use with the backup camera if my newer, main camera fails. Ironically, the offerings by the one company that had the most substantial mirrorless offerings -- Sony -- were of no interest to me because none of them offered (and still don't offer) focus-bracketing capability.
 
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I had used Olympus mirrorless cameras for quite a few years in addition to my Nikon DSLRs. I knew that I preferred mirrorless, but that Olympus sensors were a drawback. I waited until Nikon had a good mirrorless option and cautiously jumped in. Time marches on. My dad and now my brother own a jewelry store. Watches used to be a big portion of their inventory. Smart watches have changed all that. They have found ways to adapt.
You are an exception. We live in a society of instant gratification and of people always wanting the latest and greatest.
 
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You are an exception. We live in a society of instant gratification and of people always wanting the latest and greatest.
Never been my style to throw the baby out with the bathwater. Besides, loyalty has its costs— ask anyone who have been happily married to the same wonderful person for a long time. There are good times and bad. I'm ever so glad that I waited. 😍
 
Of course a major consideration in this is exactly what the customer wants and needs, and we all have different approaches to our photography. Many people do mostly landscapes, others prefer portraiture or candids of people, and still others like to get up-close and personal with their sometimes very small subjects while some prefer to be outdoors shooting wildlife on the ground, in the water or in the sky. Different needs, different preferences, and, yes, different lens requirements. If someone shoots wildlife and uses long lenses and wants one or two long lenses in mirrorless he or she is going to look to the manufacturer who offers them. The person who likes to shoot primarily macro and closeups and who wants to move to mirrorless is going to see which camera company has native mirrorless macro lenses available. So there is that.....
 
When I identify something I want, I'm much more likely to purchase it sooner than later than ever before. That's because of the ramifications of being much closer to the end of my life than the beginning of it.

A good point, Mike; at my age, back in the autumn of 2019 I realized that I didn't really have time wait around for Nikon to cough up the native mirrorless lenses I wanted. I'd been waffling around long enough as it was. Why wait any longer when I was able to switch to Sony and get exactly what I wanted when I was ready to make my decision and my purchases? I've been enjoying that A7R IV and those long lenses and macro lenses now for a year and a half.....
 
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The person who likes to shoot primarily macro and closeups and who wants to move to mirrorless is going to see which camera company has native mirrorless macro lenses available.

The number of people that primarily shoot macros and closeups is a relatively small part of the overall market.

There are other considerations as well. I spend most of my photography time in my makeshift studio and a large part of that time is spent using a macro lens. Yet I have no need or desire for a native macro lens for my Nikon Z6; the Tamron lens I have used for years and continue to use on the Nikon D7000 is also a nearly ideal fit with my Nikon Z6. It can't auto focus on the Z6 but the only time I would use auto focus is when I would want to do focus bracketing. When that's the requirement, I mount it on my D7000 and attach the CamRanger. I'm all set and won't be seriously interested in the native macro lenses once they become available.
 

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