*Italy and Coronavirus - READ IT*

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Desmond, you omitted one word from your quote. “Trump considering...”
Using the camera sensor dust analogy, wind can be finicky. Pull the lens and put the body out in the rain, rain will get rid of that dust.
Trying not to mention names and get too political :)
Actually this gave me an idea, my car has an oil leak. I'm considering leaving saucers at various spots along the road I normally travel, to catch the drops of oil so they don't contaminate the road.
 
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I would not want to start a political discussion.
On France Info (the french 24/7/365 radio station) a couple of hours ago, politicians (including a former health minister who returned to a local hospital to help), health specialists, nurses and others were very focused on key messages:
-mistakes were made by the current government but previous governments also took some decisions that have dramatic consequences today
-no country in the world was prepared for this, no single government or person is to blame
-now is not the time to analyse what went wrong, now is the time to fight COVID19 and take any measure that is needed
-focus on the task at hand, there will be time to learn for this crisis, once it is over
-democracy is NOT suspended, and will not be

It was fascinating to hear the health specialists in the field explaining that not only do they try to save as many lives as possible but they also take notes and document everything that is happening and what actions they have taken to resolve these.
All of them, regardless of their party line, were adamant that the urgency of the situation dictated that everyone unites in fighting it.
Cosmetics companies are manufacturing masks, industrial firms are shifting production to ventilators, emergency seizures and "executive orders" have been used for weeks now.
Not out of the woods yet, but post COVID-19 world will be different from the world we used to live in.
 
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My social distancing failure.....

We've had a harrowing couple of days. My dad, age 88, is on hospice with heart failure and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. But he is still fairly strong. Mom called me on Thursday afternoon and said that she couldn't wake my dad up. He was asleep in a chair in the living room. I called the hospice nurse and Greg and I rushed right over. I hate to say it, but the on call hospice nurse was not very good. She said that dad's heart rate, breathing, and oxygen was good, but he was unconscious. We encouraged her to check his blood sugar, which she should have figured out herself since dad is a diabetic. It was only 33. We tried to find some honey to put under his tongue, but they didn't have any. Greg found some glucose pills which we made a paste out of and put under his tongue. But it didn't do any good. So we called an ambulance. The EMTs gave him a glucose drip which woke him up some. We thought we were out of the woods so let the EMT's leave and we were able to keep him on hospice. By this time several neighbors had some to help. We got him in bed. We fed him some food, but he still kept going in and out of consciousness. Long story short, we ended up revoking hospice and had him taken by ambulance to the hospital. Besides the low blood sugar, he had a problem with taking too much of some of his medications. He is doing better now and is home. But my social distancing took a big dive. I was around a lot of people during the incident although I did not go into the hospital. Hopefully no one is a carrier. We only have one case in our county so the risk is probably fairly low. We have him back on hospice now, with a new company who is keeping his meds in a lock box with a nurse coming each day to make sure he takes the correct amounts of everything. Coronavirus adds an added intensity to stressful situations.
 
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Johns Creek, Ga
My social distancing failure.....

We've had a harrowing couple of days. My dad, age 88, is on hospice with heart failure and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. But he is still fairly strong. Mom called me on Thursday afternoon and said that she couldn't wake my dad up. He was asleep in a chair in the living room. I called the hospice nurse and Greg and I rushed right over. I hate to say it, but the on call hospice nurse was not very good. She said that dad's heart rate, breathing, and oxygen was good, but he was unconscious. We encouraged her to check his blood sugar, which she should have figured out herself since dad is a diabetic. It was only 33. We tried to find some honey to put under his tongue, but they didn't have any. Greg found some glucose pills which we made a paste out of and put under his tongue. But it didn't do any good. So we called an ambulance. The EMTs gave him a glucose drip which woke him up some. We thought we were out of the woods so let the EMT's leave and we were able to keep him on hospice. By this time several neighbors had some to help. We got him in bed. We fed him some food, but he still kept going in and out of consciousness. Long story short, we ended up revoking hospice and had him taken by ambulance to the hospital. Besides the low blood sugar, he had a problem with taking too much of some of his medications. He is doing better now and is home. But my social distancing took a big dive. I was around a lot of people during the incident although I did not go into the hospital. Hopefully no one is a carrier. We only have one case in our county so the risk is probably fairly low. We have him back on hospice now, with a new company who is keeping his meds in a lock box with a nurse coming each day to make sure he takes the correct amounts of everything. Coronavirus adds an added intensity to stressful situations.
Terri..try to stay sane and monitor yourself and family during these trying times.
 
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Moscow, Idaho
My social distancing failure.....

We've had a harrowing couple of days. My dad, age 88, is on hospice with heart failure and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. But he is still fairly strong. Mom called me on Thursday afternoon and said that she couldn't wake my dad up. He was asleep in a chair in the living room. I called the hospice nurse and Greg and I rushed right over. I hate to say it, but the on call hospice nurse was not very good. She said that dad's heart rate, breathing, and oxygen was good, but he was unconscious. We encouraged her to check his blood sugar, which she should have figured out herself since dad is a diabetic. It was only 33. We tried to find some honey to put under his tongue, but they didn't have any. Greg found some glucose pills which we made a paste out of and put under his tongue. But it didn't do any good. So we called an ambulance. The EMTs gave him a glucose drip which woke him up some. We thought we were out of the woods so let the EMT's leave and we were able to keep him on hospice. By this time several neighbors had some to help. We got him in bed. We fed him some food, but he still kept going in and out of consciousness. Long story short, we ended up revoking hospice and had him taken by ambulance to the hospital. Besides the low blood sugar, he had a problem with taking too much of some of his medications. He is doing better now and is home. But my social distancing took a big dive. I was around a lot of people during the incident although I did not go into the hospital. Hopefully no one is a carrier. We only have one case in our county so the risk is probably fairly low. We have him back on hospice now, with a new company who is keeping his meds in a lock box with a nurse coming each day to make sure he takes the correct amounts of everything. Coronavirus adds an added intensity to stressful situations.
Terri, sending good thoughts your way! Be Terri strong.
 
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504
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Puget Sound
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Ken
My social distancing failure.....

We've had a harrowing couple of days. My dad, age 88, is on hospice with heart failure and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. But he is still fairly strong. Mom called me on Thursday afternoon and said that she couldn't wake my dad up. He was asleep in a chair in the living room. I called the hospice nurse and Greg and I rushed right over. I hate to say it, but the on call hospice nurse was not very good. She said that dad's heart rate, breathing, and oxygen was good, but he was unconscious. We encouraged her to check his blood sugar, which she should have figured out herself since dad is a diabetic. It was only 33. We tried to find some honey to put under his tongue, but they didn't have any. Greg found some glucose pills which we made a paste out of and put under his tongue. But it didn't do any good. So we called an ambulance. The EMTs gave him a glucose drip which woke him up some. We thought we were out of the woods so let the EMT's leave and we were able to keep him on hospice. By this time several neighbors had some to help. We got him in bed. We fed him some food, but he still kept going in and out of consciousness. Long story short, we ended up revoking hospice and had him taken by ambulance to the hospital. Besides the low blood sugar, he had a problem with taking too much of some of his medications. He is doing better now and is home. But my social distancing took a big dive. I was around a lot of people during the incident although I did not go into the hospital. Hopefully no one is a carrier. We only have one case in our county so the risk is probably fairly low. We have him back on hospice now, with a new company who is keeping his meds in a lock box with a nurse coming each day to make sure he takes the correct amounts of everything. Coronavirus adds an added intensity to stressful situations.
Have some grace with yourself. You were not out partying or doing something ill advised. You were taking care of a loved family member and doing the best you could in a very difficult situation. We all have to take some risks, even if we are very risk averse and can suit up before interacting with people. So I would not call this a failure, but rather an urgent situation where some additional risk that had to be taken. Take care of yourself and try to reduce your stress as best you can as you will be of little use to your family if you become sick. You have multiple issues needing your attention, so remind yourself that this is more like a marathon than a sprint.

Take care,

--Ken
 
Joined
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Dubois, Wyoming
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Bill
My social distancing failure.....

We've had a harrowing couple of days. My dad, age 88, is on hospice with heart failure and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. But he is still fairly strong. Mom called me on Thursday afternoon and said that she couldn't wake my dad up. He was asleep in a chair in the living room. I called the hospice nurse and Greg and I rushed right over. I hate to say it, but the on call hospice nurse was not very good. She said that dad's heart rate, breathing, and oxygen was good, but he was unconscious. We encouraged her to check his blood sugar, which she should have figured out herself since dad is a diabetic. It was only 33. We tried to find some honey to put under his tongue, but they didn't have any. Greg found some glucose pills which we made a paste out of and put under his tongue. But it didn't do any good. So we called an ambulance. The EMTs gave him a glucose drip which woke him up some. We thought we were out of the woods so let the EMT's leave and we were able to keep him on hospice. By this time several neighbors had some to help. We got him in bed. We fed him some food, but he still kept going in and out of consciousness. Long story short, we ended up revoking hospice and had him taken by ambulance to the hospital. Besides the low blood sugar, he had a problem with taking too much of some of his medications. He is doing better now and is home. But my social distancing took a big dive. I was around a lot of people during the incident although I did not go into the hospital. Hopefully no one is a carrier. We only have one case in our county so the risk is probably fairly low. We have him back on hospice now, with a new company who is keeping his meds in a lock box with a nurse coming each day to make sure he takes the correct amounts of everything. Coronavirus adds an added intensity to stressful situations.
Stay safe Terri.

In a situation like that you just did what you had to do. Now you just go back to distancing and monitoring yourself. I agree that where you are the risk is considerably lower than the big cities.
 
Oh, Terri, such an ordeal! This is not a "failure" on your part at all, you can only do what is needed at the time that it is urgently needed, and of course looking after your parents -- your mother as well as your dad -- during all of this -- was imperative and absolutely necessary. Yes, you had more people around during this situation and that couldn't be helped, as the priority here was your dad's health and what was best to take care of him and his immediate needs. I am glad that things worked out OK and that now your dad is back home and that you've got a new hospice company looking after his needs, too. If there were any "failure" anywhere along the line in this scenario, IMHO it can be laid at the feet of that first hospice on-call nurse who, when called in to help, didn't even have sense enough to check your dad's blood sugar levels, knowing that he is a diabetic.

Since you live where you do and not in the middle of NYC with the coronavirus rampaging all around you, it sounds as though chances are very high that you, Greg, your parents and everyone else will still remain safe even though the social-distance thing was violated because, well, it had to be, for the patient's own safety and well-being.

You did what is most important -- you were there for your mom and your dad at a time when they needed you, and that is what counts.....
 
Joined
May 5, 2005
Messages
18,664
Location
Idaho
Have some grace with yourself. You were not out partying or doing something ill advised. You were taking care of a loved family member and doing the best you could in a very difficult situation. We all have to take some risks, even if we are very risk averse and can suit up before interacting with people. So I would not call this a failure, but rather an urgent situation where some additional risk that had to be taken. Take care of yourself and try to reduce your stress as best you can as you will be of little use to your family if you become sick. You have multiple issues needing your attention, so remind yourself that this is more like a marathon than a sprint.

Take care,

--Ken
Stay safe Terri.

In a situation like that you just did what you had to do. Now you just go back to distancing and monitoring yourself. I agree that where you are the risk is considerably lower than the big cities.
Oh, Terri, such an ordeal! This is not a "failure" on your part at all, you can only do what is needed at the time that it is urgently needed, and of course looking after your parents -- your mother as well as your dad -- during all of this -- was imperative and absolutely necessary. Yes, you had more people around during this situation and that couldn't be helped, as the priority here was your dad's health and what was best to take care of him and his immediate needs. I am glad that things worked out OK and that now your dad is back home and that you've got a new hospice company looking after his needs, too. If there were any "failure" anywhere along the line in this scenario, IMHO it can be laid at the feet of that first hospice on-call nurse who, when called in to help, didn't even have sense enough to check your dad's blood sugar levels, knowing that he is a diabetic.

Since you live where you do and not in the middle of NYC with the coronavirus rampaging all around you, it sounds as though chances are very high that you, Greg, your parents and everyone else will still remain safe even though the social-distance thing was violated because, well, it had to be, for the patient's own safety and well-being.

You did what is most important -- you were there for your mom and your dad at a time when they needed you, and that is what counts.....
Terri my thoughts are with you and we hope for the best, cheers suugaa.
You are all so kind. The wording of my original post definitely should be changed. My actions definitely were not a failure. We all did what we had to do for our dad. My parents are wonderful people who gave me the best childhood I could have hoped for. My mood is much better tonight. A dear friend left some beautiful eggs from her chickens on my front porch, Greg and I went for a beautiful walk along a ditch bank we can access from behind our house, and I watched a fun tv show. So life looks much better. It's my turn to care for my parents tomorrow. So I will be back at it again!!
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Joined
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Hamilton , New Zealand
I think I saw a mini version of what is going on around the world, at work on Monday.
I was telling all the other workers "Be prepared for lockdown, the government is probably going to announce it before the end of this week, maybe today sometime".
After 10am tea I came downstairs and the general manager, who has invested a lot of money into the business, was telling everyone "Stop listening to the doom and gloom stories, we're not going to be shutting down", then turned around and saw me and said "Especially 'Mr Doomsday' here, he's just being negative". I asked him if he realised how serious the situation was getting and mentioned the only way to stop it was a lockdown. He replied "We just have to hope it doesn't happen". I suggested that simply hoping something doesn't happen doesn't stop it.
3 hours later the announcement was made, "going into lockdown".
We've created a system based on time and money - those with a lot of money at risk just want to "hope" the problem away rather than making a costly financial decision, even if it's the only right one to make.
 
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