Showcase KMZ Tair 11A 135mm f/2.8

kilofoxtrott

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Hello my friends,
my lens park got a new member this week...

It's an old manual lens produced in the Soviet Union back in 1986.

The Tair 11A was built from 1965 to 1995 at Krasnogorsk Mechanical Plant (near Moscow/USSR). It is a Sonnar construction - 4 lenses in 3 groups. So nothing special.
The whole lens is made of glass and Aluminum and weights 600g.



The lens is equipped with a M42 thread by default, but the company offers rear caps for Nikon and Canon (it's not an adapter M42 to Nikon). This bajonett is attached with 3 screws to the barrel. My copy is modified with a Dandelion chip to transfer the data to the camera.



Some of you will say: "Oh no, not another 135mm"...

But now we'll come to the specialtiy of this lens - the diaphragm.

Let's count the aperture blades: 1, 2, 3, ..., 8, 9,... 13, 14, 15, ..., 19, 20.
Yes, this lens has 20!



This construction gives always a round aperture - even at f/22.
It's the perfect bokeh lens.

I'll try to shoot some examples over the oncoming weekend.

Enjoy
Klaus
 

kilofoxtrott

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Bokeh at f/16


Even stopped down, the bokeh is very creamy. That's the magic of 20 aperture blades...
Klaus
 

kilofoxtrott

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In the woods...
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kilofoxtrott

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On a cold winter morning...
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It's a bit tricky to shoot this lens.
Turning the aperture ring is not the only thing - I had to learn to synchronize the camera too...

Regards
Klaus
 
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One thing to know about this lens: Not all F adapters are equal. Some are ever-so slightly deeper than others and not capable of allowing the lens to focus at infinity. Here's the 'proper' adapter to look for:
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And to make you REALLY jealous, here is....... a PAIR of TAIRS!

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I spend an afternoon walking around with mine a few years back.

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And, as mentioned, the 20 rounded aperture blades makes for VERY creamy bokeh.

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I agree, this looks like a pretty remarkable lens.



Klaus, I'm not sure what you mean by "synchronize the camera". Can you put it in other words?
It tells the camera body the focal length and maximum aperture so you don't have to program it in as a 'non-CPU lens'.
 
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As with Nikon AI-S lenses? I have about six of these programmed into my cameras.
Yep. Older glass that doesn't have contacts ha to be programmed as a non-CPU lens. By putting on the dandelion chip, you don't need to program it in.
 

kilofoxtrott

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I agree, this looks like a pretty remarkable lens.



Klaus, I'm not sure what you mean by "synchronize the camera". Can you put it in other words?
I beg your pardon Jim.
Let me try it in other words...
We are spoiled by modern lenses. You choose the aperture on the dial and that's all.
Because the Tair is fully manual you have to choose the aperture on the adjustment ring of the lens.
And what I mostly forget with this lens, you have to choose the aperture value on the camera too. Otherwise the exposure wents wrong - to bright or to dark. The camera will calculate the picture with it's own settings.
In my opinion the lens works best in complete manual mode.

Thank you
Klaus
 

kilofoxtrott

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One thing to know about this lens: Not all F adapters are equal. Some are ever-so slightly deeper than others and not capable of allowing the lens to focus at infinity. Here's the 'proper' adapter to look for:
View attachment 1631927

And to make you REALLY jealous, here is....... a PAIR of TAIRS!

View attachment 1631928



I spend an afternoon walking around with mine a few years back.

View attachment 1631929

View attachment 1631930

View attachment 1631931



And, as mentioned, the 20 rounded aperture blades makes for VERY creamy bokeh.

View attachment 1631932
Thumbs up, Ken.
No, I'm not jealous. These lenses are gems. Simply contructed, built as a tank, but when there's good light the pictures are marvelous.
I'm still trying to show the bokeh at f/22. With the 20 aperture blades it must be very creamy too.

... some years ago? I hope you know where they are now...

Thank you for showing
Klaus
 

kilofoxtrott

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Yep. Older glass that doesn't have contacts ha to be programmed as a non-CPU lens. By putting on the dandelion chip, you don't need to program it in.
Ken, I've just seen in the first picture your lens was built back in 1984...
Mine is from 1986.

Klaus
 
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I beg your pardon Jim.
Let me try it in other words...
We are spoiled by modern lenses. You choose the aperture on the dial and that's all.
Because the Tair is fully manual you have to choose the aperture on the adjustment ring of the lens.
And what I mostly forget with this lens, you have to choose the aperture value on the camera too. Otherwise the exposure wents wrong - to bright or to dark. The camera will calculate the picture with it's own settings.
In my opinion the lens works best in complete manual mode.

Thank you
Klaus
Thanks, Klaus. That's just like the Nikkor AI and AI-S lenses. You program in the "non-CPU" lens data, which includes focal length and maximum aperture. The camera will then allows the use of A, S, and P modes with manual aperture control on the lens.
 
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I beg your pardon Jim.
Let me try it in other words...
We are spoiled by modern lenses. You choose the aperture on the dial and that's all.
Because the Tair is fully manual you have to choose the aperture on the adjustment ring of the lens.
And what I mostly forget with this lens, you have to choose the aperture value on the camera too. Otherwise the exposure wents wrong - to bright or to dark. The camera will calculate the picture with it's own settings.
In my opinion the lens works best in complete manual mode.

Thank you
Klaus
These Tairs are a unique type. There's actually two aperture rings. One with the traditional aperture settings (2.8, 5.6, 8, 11....), and a second ring that actually closes the aperture down to that setting. Since there's no electrical or mechanical connection between the body & lens, there's no way for the body to hold the aperture open while focusing and composing, then close it down when the shutter fires. You have to do this manually. Focus and compose, then turn the second ring to close the aperture.

Metering is another issue. If you meter with the aperture open, then close it down to, say, f/5.6, you'll need to either adjust your shutter speed and/or ISO, or use a aperture-preferred or auto ISO.

Kilo, I know you know this. I'm just tossing it out for those who might be interested in this type of lens.
 

kilofoxtrott

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Kilo, I know you know this. I'm just tossing it out for those who might be interested in this type of lens.
Yes Ken, I know it already but never ever heard it that precisely in English language.

Thanks a lot for explaining
Klaus
 

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