Large Format Portrait

F64

Joined
Dec 28, 2020
Messages
18
Location
Southwestern Ontario
Real Name
Greg
Taken on 4X5 Agfa Ansco large format camera of WWII vintage with a 135mm f5.6 Wollensak lens. Shot on Tri-X under tungsten lighting at 1/30 sec. at f16. I sepia toned the bottom photo for effect.
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2005
Messages
2,331
Location
Winter Haven, florida
I love tri-x film.
I hate tri-x film.
Shot with it for probably 20years-only 35mm. It was all I could afford. It does have a certain "look" that digital can not emulate. Nicely done here.
If you are going to the trouble of 4x5- I would lose the ring. It has the same sparkle as the eyes and draws attention away from the face.
Thanks for sharing
gary
 
Joined
Oct 4, 2017
Messages
3,675
Location
Kuşadası / Turkey
Both very nice. The second one looks better to me as the light doesn't cause some distractions and I can see her beautiful face better.
 
Joined
Sep 20, 2009
Messages
17,239
These are really beautiful!
So wonderful to see this old equipment still delivering.

I would lose the ring. It has the same sparkle as the eyes and draws attention away from the face
Does it?
when I read this remark, I first thought you were taking about a part of the camera, lens or lighting.
then I went back to the original post to try to understand it.
When examining the second photo, then I found the ring you referred to :)

To be clear, I don't write this to be argumentative!
Just to illustrate not everyone observes an image in the same way :)
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2005
Messages
2,331
Location
Winter Haven, florida
Just to illustrate not everyone observes an image in the same way :)
Certainly not argumentative!
Funny, the finger ring in the second image was the first thing I saw, and once I saw it- that was all I could look at.
Most things about art are just opinions. I really like to hear the different opinions on my own work. I often learn, and I sometimes ignore. But always interesting to hear how others look at our images. In shows, I often have people point things out in my images that I never ever saw.
gary
 

F64

Joined
Dec 28, 2020
Messages
18
Location
Southwestern Ontario
Real Name
Greg
Certainly not argumentative!
Funny, the finger ring in the second image was the first thing I saw, and once I saw it- that was all I could look at.
Most things about art are just opinions. I really like to hear the different opinions on my own work. I often learn, and I sometimes ignore. But always interesting to hear how others look at our images. In shows, I often have people point things out in my images that I never ever saw.
gary
I see what you're saying about the ring. I purposely composed the picture that way. The girl and I were classmates in high school - and the ring is her high school ring. If I were smarter, I suppose I would have taken 2 pictures - one with and one without the ring.
Thanks for the feedback.
I also have a cropped version of the top photo cutting the light out of view which I like better. I don't know which people would prefer so I'll upload it and let you guys opine on which is better.
 

F64

Joined
Dec 28, 2020
Messages
18
Location
Southwestern Ontario
Real Name
Greg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 

F64

Joined
Dec 28, 2020
Messages
18
Location
Southwestern Ontario
Real Name
Greg
I love tri-x film.
I hate tri-x film.
Shot with it for probably 20years-only 35mm. It was all I could afford. It does have a certain "look" that digital can not emulate. Nicely done here.
gary
Tri-X really dominated a picture in 35mm the grain was so prominent. For 35mm I pretty much used Plus-X Pan in the old days and was very pleased with that. In large format, the speed of Tri-X was a real benefit, and of course, the grain wasn't an issue at 4X5 and larger.
 
Joined
Jan 21, 2006
Messages
1,842
Location
Johns Creek, Ga
Really like the 1st image and the chromy tones in her hair. If I was to add toning would probably have gone with selenium vs sepia. Although used Tri-x back in 60-70, switched over to Ilfords Fp4 late 70’s. Currently use fp4+ with 35 mm and in 4x5 . If I need little more speed for 4x5 will use hp5+. Both developed with pmk pyro.
 
Joined
Nov 14, 2005
Messages
2,331
Location
Winter Haven, florida
Tri-X really dominated a picture in 35mm the grain was so prominent.
I actually got interested in photography because of tri-x grain.
The art department at my college contacted the chemistry department for help in minimizing grain while pushing tri-x 4-5 stops.
The chemistry department sent me- probably thought they were sending Mr. Bean
I had never seen a darkroom before, had no idea that a stop bath was different than a stop of light- I knew nothing about photography. I did know chemistry. This was 1971-72,
Worked with some chemist contacts at Kodak labs and over about a year actually got the grain under some control- it was only the size of marbles instead of basketballs. I remember it was a 2 developer process with different agents and different temperatures, but otherwise don't remember the details.
Then I fell in love with darkroom printing- and here I still am some 50yrs later.
gary
 
Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Nikon Cafe is a fan site and not associated with Nikon Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Copyright © 2005-2019 Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom