Large storage recommendations

Joined
Apr 26, 2009
Messages
1,118
Location
Vegas
A while back I bought a NAS for storing pictures and iTunes library (lot's of movies). Never been happy with the NAS and Now I think it's having issues. LR is struggling (finding file errors that never existed before) and copying files from it to my iMac is also.

Not sure I want to spend money on another NAS, but not sure what other options I have? I could buy a large hard drive and put it in a Thunderbird enclosure (if I can find one). That would work for LR but iTunes stores everything in one folder and I'm concerned about running out of space.

With D7100 files sizes, storage is going to be an issue...eventually.

What do folks here use or recommend?

Thanks
 
Joined
May 3, 2007
Messages
6,711
Location
Colorado Springs, Colorado
Here is what I use for storage, in a RAID-1 mirrored configuration. Pretty fast, only uses one TB port on the computer.

http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/Thunderbolt/Elite_eSATA

I have a separate drive for time machine backups.
The OWC drives are good and reasonably priced. They also have knowledgable people to talk to. Try their chat support and ask your questions there. They might have some creative solutions. I've had excellent experiences dealing with them and the chat support has been very good.

Regarding RAID, a lot depends on your use case and whether or not you are trying for data resilience or performance. I consider most RAID configurations a terrible idea for the average user because the complexity, especially when something breaks, and because most RAID levels are aimed at surviving errors long enough to fix them. The idea is maximum uptime. Maximum uptime is simply not on my radar screen as a priority.

A stripe set (nominally a RAID level, RAID 0) can provide some performance benefits. The other RAID levels are, in my opinion, best left for data centers and web servers. Far better to choose external hard drive hardware carefully, be disciplined about backups and test those backups occasionally.
 
Joined
Nov 5, 2007
Messages
2,551
Location
Chester, Virginia, USA
Not sure which NAS you bought, but Synology makes exception products.

I have had mine now for 4 years, same drives in them and not one hiccup. 4 x 2 GB drives. Of course.. always have a backup option.

It is fast and loaded with options.

The newer ones are even faster, but as long as mine is trucking along.. I am happy.

Don
 
Joined
Apr 26, 2009
Messages
1,118
Location
Vegas
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #8
I considered Synology, but Netgear's ReadyNAS NV+ kinda soured me on the idea.
 
Joined
Aug 15, 2007
Messages
2,483
Location
Kalamazoo, MI
The OWC drives are good and reasonably priced. They also have knowledgable people to talk to. Try their chat support and ask your questions there. They might have some creative solutions. I've had excellent experiences dealing with them and the chat support has been very good.

Regarding RAID, a lot depends on your use case and whether or not you are trying for data resilience or performance. I consider most RAID configurations a terrible idea for the average user because the complexity, especially when something breaks, and because most RAID levels are aimed at surviving errors long enough to fix them. The idea is maximum uptime. Maximum uptime is simply not on my radar screen as a priority.

A stripe set (nominally a RAID level, RAID 0) can provide some performance benefits. The other RAID levels are, in my opinion, best left for data centers and web servers. Far better to choose external hard drive hardware carefully, be disciplined about backups and test those backups occasionally.
Doug,

This is the first RAID I've used, coming from using a JBOD system that I ultimately was too lazy to keep up regularly with. I also downsized my internal drive to an SSD just for running programs, with around 100GB extra to work on photos or transcode movies.

My first concern was dealing with drive failure. A RAID-1 seemed to be a good idea as the odds of failure of 2 drives within a day of each other is pretty low. It's pretty easy to open the enclosure, take out the bad drive, insert the new one, and regain redundancy. Setup was super easy, just a software RAID through the Mac OS. It's plenty fast for still photo work that I do (don't use Photoshop, just Lightroom). And I like that it only uses 1 Thunderbolt port via the adapter, while the drives are just eSATA and I didn't have to pay extra for the USB3/FW800 on each drive. It also keeps the USB ports open.

I still keep Time Machine separate on 1 drive, will probably start alternating drives and keeping one off site. The last thing to do is have a redundant backup drive off site for all of my photos. I plan to get a 3TB or 4TB 5400rpm drive just for that purpose. I haven't signed up for any cloud storage at this point.
 
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