Leica CL - Just Another Brick in the Wall

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Jun 22, 2016
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Sugar Land, Texas
Our favorite coffee roaster is in a converted drive through bank building. I have been struck by the way the light falls across the bricks and the contrast on the white painted brick. I stopped by this afternoon for a coffee and a few shots. I need to go back in the morning to get the shadows running opposite direction. The angles can be fairly dramatic in early morning.
Please let me know what you think about composition, post processing, etc.

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Brick in the Wall (L1000655)

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Brick in the Wall (L1000657-2)
 
Joined
Jun 22, 2016
Messages
766
Location
Sugar Land, Texas
I find the 2nd one to more interesting with the shadow touching all 4 sides of the image.
Thanks, That is better. I will keep that in mind when shooting in the morning. I have gone back and decreased the yellow component. The results are to enhance the mortar layers

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Granted these are meant to be artsy. But is that not part of the fun of photography? Looking at every day items differently than the rest of the world?
 

Growltiger

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Our favorite coffee roaster is in a converted drive through bank building. I have been struck by the way the light falls across the bricks and the contrast on the white painted brick. I stopped by this afternoon for a coffee and a few shots. I need to go back in the morning to get the shadows running opposite direction. The angles can be fairly dramatic in early morning.
Please let me know what you think about composition, post processing, etc.
Before you read my comments I have to inform you that I have an obsession with achieving perfect perspective and linearity. This is mostly of concern with architectural photos, where vertical structures should be properly vertical. (Horizons also concern me).
The first image is not properly aligned. The pipe leans to the right.
The second image is much worse. Everything about it is crooked. You took the photo looking downward, as well as being tilted clockwise.
However not all is lost, the problems can be fixed in Photoshop using the Lens Distortion corrections.
When doing this type of photo again be sure to hold the camera level, not aimed up or down or left or right. You could have crouched down to get the second photo.

Having got that out of the way, was that pipe an important part of your perception? Should it be included or excluded? I suspect you would do better to get rid of it.

Couldn't you get more texture in the bricks? Underexpose and bring out the texture more in post processing? Photograph them in colour?
 
Joined
Jun 22, 2016
Messages
766
Location
Sugar Land, Texas
Before you read my comments I have to inform you that I have an obsession with achieving perfect perspective and linearity. This is mostly of concern with architectural photos, where vertical structures should be properly vertical. (Horizons also concern me).
The first image is not properly aligned. The pipe leans to the right.
The second image is much worse. Everything about it is crooked. You took the photo looking downward, as well as being tilted clockwise.
However not all is lost, the problems can be fixed in Photoshop using the Lens Distortion corrections.
When doing this type of photo again be sure to hold the camera level, not aimed up or down or left or right. You could have crouched down to get the second photo.

Having got that out of the way, was that pipe an important part of your perception? Should it be included or excluded? I suspect you would do better to get rid of it.

Couldn't you get more texture in the bricks? Underexpose and bring out the texture more in post processing? Photograph them in colour?
Thanks for the comments. That is what I was looking for.
There is not much I can do about the conduit except not include it in the photo. When I take it in the morning instead of the afternoon, not including it will not be an issue.
The composition issue can be fixed using a tripod instead of hand holding.
The wall has been painted white. The photo was taken in color (DNG format) and converted in LR. I am still learning LR so there is room for improvement. On the second set of two, I decreased the yellow to act as a yellow filter (-71 setting). After posting the initial photos, I realized I needed to do something to increase the contrast in the mortar joints to make them stand out more.

As far as the attention to detail, I am with you. I need to make sure the camera is completely level and the lens face parallel to the wall. With any luck next Saturday, the sun will be shining and my wife will be patient while I get the photos I want. ;)
 
I really like the second one because the conduit's line combined with the shadow's line and the edges of the frame creates so many interesting geometric shapes.

Good luck getting the image perfectly straight, as I would be willing to bet that neither the bricks nor the conduit are straight throughout. One way to minimize the amount of work needed during post-processing is to turn the camera on such a strong angle that the viewer couldn't possibly think it is a mistake. Images made that way can also be more dynamic (the opposite of static).
 

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