Location Location....

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Doug Barber, Jul 3, 2008.

  1. If there has been one thing I've learned in the past year working in the Arctic. It is LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION.

    I'm not sure if that is much different than shooting anyplace else. But at the top of the world, planning and location is everything.

    Here is a shot of my ride testing my new shooting location before they came and plucked me off one rock face I was on to get me on that one....

    [​IMG]

    Once it was determined the rock was stable... the helicopter came and got me and put me on the rock

    [​IMG]
     
  2. *GULP*

    You're a better man than I, Charlie Brown!!! :eek: I can't wait to see the images you took from that pinnacle but I sure wouldn't want my stomach to be there!!!!
     
  3. WOW Doug......just WOW!!! :eek: :biggrin:
     
  4. Phillip Ino

    Phillip Ino

    Nov 26, 2007
    Austin
    Holy smokes! Let's see some more!
     
  5. My word!!! Wow!!!
     
  6. Thanks everyone...

    This was a very good evening as the light was wonderful and I'm sure one I will remember for a while
     
  7. Cool!!!!!!!!

    I'm speechless.
     
  8. Thanks Phil.... hope all is well in your corner of the world
     
  9. holy freakin' cow
     
  10. Yikes! And how long were you on that promontory?
     
  11. What's the probe on the helicopter for, Doug? It looks like a sensor or antenna of some kind?
     
  12. Hi Rich:
    I jumped on this to capture some images of a bird colony that was located on the rock face right next to the pinnacle. Getting there was easy because of the helicopter.... Staying there was sort of easy once the my ride left. But trying to stay on with the prop wash as he left was another story!

    It is a sensor that is used for measuring ice thickness... We fly a few feet off the ice and map the ice thickness to give us an idea of the effects of Climate change.
     
  13. Interesting - kind of figured it was for mapping of some kind. Thanks!
     
  14. Awesomely cooooool and gutsy!!!!!! Can I change places with you??? I have no fear of heights either.
     
  15. Oh my Doug, this begs the question of how the first image was taken. What an experience this must have been.
     
  16. Commodorefirst

    Commodorefirst Admin/Moderator Administrator

    May 1, 2005
    Missouri
    super shots dougs, thanks for the updates here on the cafe.
     
  17. Greetings Gordon:

    I was located on a rock cliff trying to get images of birds.... Once the helicopter dropped me off (and almost blew me off the rock face) it left to stop scaring the heck out of my subjects. Upon its return I talked to the captain and asked him to test the outcrop for strength before he picked me up and moved me on to it. The plan was to locate me on the top of it as my vantage point to the nesting birds would be much better.

    Once we figured out that it was safe (a relative term) they came back and collected me. Being on the rock itself was not that big of a deal as it was about 10-12 ft across and only a few hundred Feet in the air. Trying to stay on it with both the winds and prop wash from the helicopter was another matter.

    Once out and on the rock, I tethered myself to the rock a began to shoot my birds.

    Here is a few more images to give you an idea what the other vantage points looked like...

    Another shot of the helicopter coming to collect me...

    [​IMG]

    This is me as I think about jumping out....

    [​IMG]

    The view of the rock just before touchdown....

    [​IMG]

    The helicopter skid to give you an idea of how it looked on top....

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Holy crap Doug..I get dizzy just looking at the pictures!!!
    What a go!
     
  19. Thanks Doug, that is all pretty scary but by the same token an experience you will not forget. I'll bet you had no thought about what an extraordinary venture this would be when you were first given the opportunity to join this expedition. I can still remember when you are I were talking about what camera equipment to take.
     

  20. You are right Gordon....

    The adventure has been spectacular and one I will not soon forget. Looking back it was a good thing I had help for people like you, Dave and Bob with the kite. As I'm sure I would not have been as well prepared without the help.

    In the end this project is much bigger than I had imagined and by the time it is over my images will be all over the world. It seems like everyday there is someone wanting images for one publication or the other.

    Heck my next trip even included a composer and conductor who will follow me for (2) weeks as they soak in the Arctic and what I do. After that they will write a (new) Symphony and marry the music to my images. This of course is not anything I felt would be possible when I started the project. But to have a symphony written around ones images is sort of a big deal (at least for me) Further it will be a (big) addition to the book launch to have a full Symphony Orchestra playing during the gala launch the University is planning.
    http://www.wso.mb.ca/milestones.asp

    Finally, I always knew my images would be published worldwide. But I did not think that the world media would actually care much about me (other than getting access to my images)....
    This has not been the case and we have seen several different media outlets interested in my story and why I'm doing it. Here is a (pdf) copy of a magazine article that printed a while back. Mind you I cannot read it as it is in Spanish from Guatemala.

    (sorry if it slow loading.... At one point I had a web link for this but I must have lost it)

    http://www.dougbarberphotography.com/Images/DOUG.pdf

    Finally here is a link to a radio interview with my from back last winter. You will have to scroll down a little on the page but just keep going down till you see an image of a kitr flying on the ice.

    http://www.cbc.ca/afternooneditionsask/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 4, 2008