lost wedding etc. shots

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by LDB415, Jul 18, 2008.

  1. LDB415

    LDB415

    929
    Apr 26, 2008
    Texas
    I was thinking and got to wondering about lost work product. I was wondering how common it is to discover a group of shots are corrupted somehow. I also wonder if it was more common in the days of film or now with digital. :confused:
     
  2. LDB415

    LDB415

    929
    Apr 26, 2008
    Texas
    Nobody has any thoughts on whether more was lost due to bad chemicals on film or bad electrons on chips? No horror stories that happened to Wilburt your third cousin, twice removed?
     
  3. I only ever had 1 Lexar CF card go bad - and it went bad right after the last file was uploaded to my PC (yep, the gods were watching out for me...). But, I still won't go bigger than 4 gig - don't want to tempt fate...
     
  4. LDB415

    LDB415

    929
    Apr 26, 2008
    Texas
    So far all my cards are 2g cards. If I set for both raw and jpeg they're good for about 100 shots per card and I have half a dozen. I would personally run out of steam before running out of memory.
     
  5. I am looking for (well found what I want) a CF to hard drive backup device. I have about 7 x 4 gig cards but I shoot photos for skating competitions and even on jpeg mode I can fill them pretty quick.... and I do not use burst mode very often on the D300...
     
  6. Cope

    Cope

    Apr 5, 2007
    Houston, Texas
    I f you tabulated the lost or corrupted shots, I think it would be a pretty small number compared to film days.

    I have been shooting digital for 9 years, and the only corrupted shot I have had were on an HP C200 1MP P&S. I had 5 or 6 shots that looked like they had been through a kaleidoscope, but it never happened again.
     
  7. I think it's absolutely minimal compared to film. Especially with flash/strobe work. With film, you learned early on (or you wasted a lot of time and didn't get any more gigs) to check that the film was loaded properly and that it was advancing, you learned to ensure your ASA/ISO settings matched your film, you learned to shoot multiples to get everyone's eyes open at the right time, you learned to meter based on neutral gray, to filter for lighting, to adjust metering for backlit scenes, to ensure your film had rewound before opening the back of your body, to ensure your film was processed quickly or stored properly until processing, or your whole shoot was wasted. Today, with LCDs and chimping, AWB, etc., none of those things should be an issue.