Lyndee Loo's 52 Week Project - 2021 - Week 7

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LOL - thank you!! :ROFLMAO:

You're absolutely right about the car in the cinema photo. I do need to crop it out, for sure.

In terms of the background material for the shoe photo, it's simply a piece of black cardboard from the Dollar Tree store. This weekend, I ended up making a rudimentary table top 'studio', that cost all of $11 and some change. I purchased a large cardboard box from Walmart ($1.37), a large black poster board, clips, a plastic painter's drop cloth (all from Dollar Tree) and a desk lamp (Walmart, $6.88). After assembling the box, I cut holes in the sides and covered the holes with the plastic drop cloth to diffuse the light from the desk lamp. I then cut a slit in the top of the box, slid the poster board thru it and secured it to the box with the clips. So far, the 'studio' seems to be working well! :shame:
Quick question. I know that the black poster board was slid in, but was it also curved from the back down to the floor of the box to create a seamless backdrop?

Thanks,

--Ken
 

LyndeeLoo

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Quick question. I know that the black poster board was slid in, but was it also curved from the back down to the floor of the box to create a seamless backdrop?

Thanks,

--Ken
Hi Ken - when I clipped the poster to the box, a natural curve was created that didn’t involve any manipulation. Also, the size of the poster board was the exact same size as the box I purchased from Walmart, so I didn’t need to cut it down. I’m not at home, otherwise I would take a photo to show you what I mean. I will take one when I get home later this evening and post it.
 
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a natural curve was created that didn’t involve any manipulation
I was also wondering about that. That explanation makes perfect sense.

That setup is ideal for when you don't want an horizon to be displayed in the scene; not so good when you do want an horizon. Even so, it's one heck of a LOT easier to create a pleasing horizon than to create a tabletop and background from one piece of material that displays no horizon. You've done very well with that setup!
 
You can also use fabric and drape it so that there is one smooth background-leading-to-surface beneath the subject. In professional portrait studios they have actual huge rolls of seamless paper that they use, but that's much too large for using in a tabletop setup. With many of the light tents or "portable studios" on the market they will provide a few "sweeps" in different colors which connect via velcro at top and bottom in order for the photographer to achieve that seamless look, too.
 
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LyndeeLoo

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Here’s the setup:
72F12E12-DD26-4B33-BE4B-FF15891FC1FB.jpeg
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0E10D302-8117-46D7-98D1-226607DED16A.jpeg
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LyndeeLoo

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You can also use fabric and drape it so that there is one smooth background-leading-to-surface beneath the subject. In professional portrait studios they have actual huge rolls of seamless paper that they use, but that's much too large for using in a tabletop setup. With many of the light tents or "portable studios" on the market they will provide a few "sweeps" in different colors which connect via velcro at top and bottom in order for the photographer to achieve that seamless look, too.
Indeed. I plan to look for papers in different colors. Thanks for the tip!
 
Setup looks good and should serve you well! I see that the lamp has LED lighting -- excellent! In the old days we always had issues with film sensitivity to different light sources, but with newer lighting such as LED that is not nearly as much of a problem. You might want to pick up a second lamp (at that price, why not?) as there are times when you'll need a second light source coming from another direction. Also, both Mike and I have found that using LED flashlights can come in surprisingly handy as well, especially for illuminating just one small area in the overall scene.
 

LyndeeLoo

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I was also wondering about that. That explanation makes perfect sense.

That setup is ideal for when you don't want an horizon to be displayed in the scene; not so good when you do want an horizon. Even so, it's one heck of a LOT easier to create a pleasing horizon than to create a tabletop and background from one piece of material that displays no horizon. You've done very well with that setup!
Why, thank you, sir!
 

LyndeeLoo

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Setup looks good and should serve you well! I see that the lamp has LED lighting -- excellent! In the old days we always had issues with film sensitivity to different light sources, but with newer lighting such as LED that is not nearly as much of a problem. You might want to pick up a second lamp (at that price, why not?) as there are times when you'll need a second light source coming from another direction. Also, both Mike and I have found that using LED flashlights can come in surprisingly handy as well, especially for illuminating just one small area in the overall scene.
I see great minds think alike, LOL! I have a second light, but I’m going to purchase another one because the second light is what I use in my office. I also purchased a small directional clip on light from the dollar store. I figured it may come in handy if I want to illuminate small items.
 
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I've got an idea for you, Lyndee: Notice the edges of the shadows in your photo of the shoes. Add more diffusion material using additional layers and/or more diffuse material. As you add the material, notice the edges of the shadows becoming softer and softer. It's important to be aware of this so you can create the exact quality of shadows that meets your needs, whether they are very hard, very soft or something in between.
 

LyndeeLoo

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Discovered this structure on one of my early morning "drive-by's", and cannot find out what style of home it is/was. It certainly isn't Italianate, or Greek Revival and it's not a Craftsman. I've been looking at our local Historical Society website but haven't come up with anything yet. I'll keep digging, though! :)

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Huh......looks like some sort of European-influenced duplex? Built a while ago and eventually the road and sidewalk took priority over what land they might have had there as a front yard? Or perhaps rather than now continuing as someone's private home(s) this is actually a single shop or two shops under the same or different ownership, with architecture remaining duplex-style. ?? What do the two signs hanging at the ends of the building/ top of each side say?
 

LyndeeLoo

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Huh......looks like some sort of European-influenced duplex? Built a while ago and eventually the road and sidewalk took priority over what land they might have had there as a front yard? Or perhaps rather than now continuing as someone's private home(s) this is actually a single shop or two shops under the same or different ownership, with architecture remaining duplex-style. ?? What do the two signs hanging at the ends of the building/ top of each side say?
It was a home that's now two businesses. This is located in the historical section of St. Charles, MO, approximately 20 minutes from where I live. The businesses are both gift shops selling handmade items. As I was there early a.m., they were closed. Oh well, next time!
 
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I have not had the pleasure of visiting St. Charles, but my guess is the building dates to the early half of the 19th century, probably around 1825-1835. It looks a bit like Early Vernacular with some east coast influences mixed with a bit of French influence. These articles/pictures may help you further research this building:

http://stlouispatina.com/gaine-street-between-indiana-avenue-and-devolsey-street/
http://stlouispatina.com/pestalozzi-street-between-iowa-and-california-avenues-benton-park-west/
http://stlouispatina.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/The-Patch-023.jpg

Good luck,

--Ken
 

LyndeeLoo

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I have not had the pleasure of visiting St. Charles, but my guess is the building dates to the early half of the 19th century, probably around 1825-1835. It looks a bit like Early Vernacular with some east coast influences mixed with a bit of French influence. These articles/pictures may help you further research this building:

http://stlouispatina.com/gaine-street-between-indiana-avenue-and-devolsey-street/
http://stlouispatina.com/pestalozzi-street-between-iowa-and-california-avenues-benton-park-west/
http://stlouispatina.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/The-Patch-023.jpg

Good luck,

--Ken
Thank you so much, Ken - I'll check them out!
 

LyndeeLoo

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Week 5

Pretty in Pink​
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