Male Female ?

Joined
Oct 4, 2012
Messages
1,118
Location
Denmark
I caught them inside a relative small area, and Wonder if they are male and female.
Is there one, (William maybe :smile: ) who can help me here.
There is also the posibility that they are the same, but just a few weeks apart in apearance.

Thanks for watching or helping
Nico


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Macro 2-07-13_02 07 13_6130_edited-1.jpg by Nicolaas C M, on Flickr

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Macro sundag_02 06 13_4356_edited-2.jpg by Nicolaas C M, on Flickr
 
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
10,008
Location
Aberdeen, WA USA
Nice shots, Nico...! :cool:

The first is a Broad-bodied Chaser - Libellula depressa
(Male and Female pic's)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broad-bodied_Chaser

The second is a Four-spotted Chasser - Libellula Quadrimaculata Linnaeus
(Male and Female pic's)
http://ianharris46.wordpress.com/2012/10/22/4-spotted-chaserlibellula-quadrimaculata/

Telling the difference between Male and Female can be different depending on the species... I'm not
that good at it so I just search for pic's of both...

Adults: Identifying males and females is not difficult. Males will have what appears to be a pouch on the second and third abdominal segments that contain secondary genitalia. The actual male genitalia will be found on the last abdominal segments along with a grasping structure that will be used to hold the female while mating. The male produces sperm at the tip of the abdomen and transfers this sperm to the secondary genitalia where the female will have access to it. Females do not have secondary genitalia or grasping structures at the end of the abdomen but instead have a single genital opening and a small ovipositor at the end of the abdomen that will be used to oviposite her eggs (see above for types of oviposition). Normally, the male dragonfly is more colorful while the female will be a dull brown or grey. This is not true for all odonates. For example, both sexes of Calopteryx maculata are very similar in coloration with the exception of the female having a white pterostigma while the male does not.
Source: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/misc/odonata/odonata.htm
 
Joined
Oct 4, 2012
Messages
1,118
Location
Denmark
Nice shots, Nico...! :cool:

The first is a Broad-bodied Chaser - Libellula depressa
(Male and Female pic's)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broad-bodied_Chaser

The second is a Four-spotted Chasser - Libellula Quadrimaculata Linnaeus
(Male and Female pic's)
http://ianharris46.wordpress.com/2012/10/22/4-spotted-chaserlibellula-quadrimaculata/

Telling the difference between Male and Female can be different depending on the species... I'm not
that good at it so I just search for pic's of both...


Source: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/misc/odonata/odonata.htm


Hi William
Thank you so much, I am about to display a couple of these pictures at my local golfclub, and want to be prepared for questions :smile:

Have tried myself to locate and name them, but as a novice, its not easy,,,, hmmm how the heck did Darwin find out :confused:

Thank you so much for the links, they are posted in fav,s and make it easier next time around if I am so lucky to find more of them.

Have a good week
Nico
 

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