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Many Dragons and one Damsel in distress

Discussion in 'Macro, Flowers, Insects, and Greenery' started by Spectre, Jul 20, 2008.

  1. Spectre

    Spectre

    Feb 20, 2008
    Oregon
    Went out this morning on a dragon hunt and actually managed to shoot 2 dragons that I had not been able to previously.

    1. Tramea lacerata - Black Saddlebags

    This is the first time I have been able to get close enough to shoot the saddlebags.

    [​IMG]

    2. Tramea lacerata - Black Saddlebags

    [​IMG]

    3. Tramea lacerata - Black Saddlebags

    [​IMG]

    4. Anax junius - Common Green Darner

    This one is also a first for me today. The Green Darner never seems to want to perch.... or at least very seldom, and out of reach.

    [​IMG]

    5. Anax junius - Common Green Darner

    [​IMG]

    6. Macromia magnifica - Western River Cruiser

    [​IMG]

    7. Macromia magnifica - Western River Cruiser

    [​IMG]

    8. Western Pondhawk Female - Eating a Damselfly

    [​IMG]

    9. Western Pondhawk Male

    [​IMG]
     
  2. tojor

    tojor

    Jul 27, 2005
    Denmark
    Excellent shots Paul. Congratulations with the 2 new species. If the Anax junius is just like his cousin over here - the Anax Imperator - you've got quite a scoop. I cannot count the hours I have been chasing him for a couple of nice shots. I like the Macromia magnifica as well. I wish we had the Western Pondhawk. It sure is a pretty dragonfly.
     
  3. Very nice collection of shots, Paul. You had a great day with the "first" captures. The Green Darners and the Western Pond Hawk are my favorites. Thanks for sharing them.
     
  4. Spectre

    Spectre

    Feb 20, 2008
    Oregon
    Torben,
    The Anax junius is interesting, it spends the day patrolling out over the water, not really coming closer than about 2-3 yards from the shore. I have sat and watched them for extended periods of time and rarely seen them come to shore. When they do it's usually in a location far away from me and inaccessible.
    The Tramea lacerata (black saddlebags) is fast an not tolerant of people. I found this one pretty early trying to warm up. He was fairly high up in a tree and I had a bit of a time getting a clear shot of it. Once they warm up, it is really difficult to get anywhere close to them.
    The Western Pondhawk is a beautiful dragon. They aren't really scared of people, in fact they apppear really curious ... or playful. They will land right in front of me and wait until I almost step on them before they move. When they do move, it will be about 5-10 feet infront of me and wait for me again. If I stop walking they will wait and then circle around me and land... sometimes on my camera.
     
  5. Spectre

    Spectre

    Feb 20, 2008
    Oregon
    Thanks Tom.

    Thanks Phil.
     
  6. Butlerkid

    Butlerkid Cafe Ambassador Moderator

    Apr 8, 2008
    Rutledge, Tennessee
    Karen
    Wonderful! Thanks for sharing!


    How do you identify the different ones? I'm new to dragonflies and damsels and would like to at least take the first steps in identifying what I see! :confused: 
     
  7. Spectre

    Spectre

    Feb 20, 2008
    Oregon
    Karen,
    First of all Thank you.
    In order to find out what you are looking at, the web is your friend. I did a search for Odonata (dragonfly family) for Tennessee and found a lot of links for Dragonfly info. The first link that came up is here and should be able to help a bit. You may have to dig a bit, but you will find info detailing which dragons are in your area and how to identify them. This forum is also a great resource. If you can't ID one, post a picture and ask for an ID and someone should be able to help. Torben and Jukka are great.
     
  8. Butlerkid

    Butlerkid Cafe Ambassador Moderator

    Apr 8, 2008
    Rutledge, Tennessee
    Karen
    Thanks!

    I didn't even know "odonata" !

    Next, I'll have to learn the difference between a dragonfly and a damsel! :eek: 

    Karen
     
  9. Very nice series, Paul!

    I was just looking where to go next summer and our version of Macromia magnifica (that´s a beautiful Dragon) was very interesting but I think I´m going to go after a Lindenia tetraphylla...
     
  10. Spectre

    Spectre

    Feb 20, 2008
    Oregon
    Jukka,
    Thank You.
    I agree the Macromia magnifica is a beautiful dragon. I have actually seen 3 seperate ones patroling their areas at once.
    I did a search on the Lindenia tetraphylla.... what a great dragon. I hope you find one and share the pictures.
     
  11. tojor

    tojor

    Jul 27, 2005
    Denmark
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