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melting glass @1.4

Discussion in 'Lens Lust' started by Nuteshack, Sep 15, 2008.

  1. Nuteshack

    Nuteshack Guest

    d200/85 1.4

    @1.4
    2858780712_0b996d6202_o.
    NIKON D200    ---    85mm    f/1.4    1/800s    ISO 100

    :eek: 
     
  2. wgilles

    wgilles

    Apr 25, 2008
    NJ
    Looks good, but to me the glass looks way too out of focus and the guys beat red face looks really in focus, I think it should have been the other way around. Maybe go to 2.8?
     
  3. Nuteshack

    Nuteshack Guest

    thanks Will, but i was actually focusing on his red face..lol
    :wink:
     
  4. I always thought that kind of art was amazing and I don't see how they can be so precise with something so pliable as hot glass.

    It looks like the guy is about to have a heart attack!!
     
  5. liftoff

    liftoff

    308
    Dec 21, 2007
    Phoenix, AZ
    Amazing capture Nute! I really have to stop looking at your shots...I'm trying to hold off on spending more $ and you make it pretty darn difficult to do so with examples like that!
    :eek: 
     
  6. Nuteshack

    Nuteshack Guest

    it is amazing ...i'm always afraid one of these guys will suck instead of blow and cough up a lung right in front of me:eek: 
     
  7. Nuteshack

    Nuteshack Guest

    thanks Larry...i feel the same pain when viewing all the fine d3/700 captures...but what can u do?
    :frown:
     
  8. great shot nute, you and the 85 seem to go together like peas and carrots. on a side note, i dont think i could do that guys job, way to close to the fire for my taste :) 
     
  9. Doug

    Doug

    Jan 17, 2006
    East TN
    The trick is correct temperature. Not so hot that the glass collapses, just hot enough the molecules will move. Plus, this glass is made to do this in hollow rods initially. Not to take away from what he's doing, but to put it in perspective. In my view, working with molten hunks of glass on the end of turning rods is a much more intricate and difficult process that glass trinket making. Though it is an art form, and not something you pick up overnight I am sure.
     
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