MX - give me advice!

Joined
Oct 19, 2010
Messages
100
Location
AK
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Shot with D7000, 18-200VRII
Shutter 1600, Auto-ISO.

C&C Much appreciated, I'm here to learn.

Thanks for looking!
 
Joined
Aug 11, 2008
Messages
1,924
Location
Madison, Wisconsin
I'm no expert, but I'll give my 2 cents worth.

1. Cropping. Close crops usually win out over shots taken wider or with less cropping. These typically show more expressions and detail. In your case #1 and #11 are really nice. Cropping #6 would improve this shot I believe.

2. Backgrounds. Using the 18-200, especially at the long end, results in a large depth of field, which in some cases distracts from your subject and doesn't give your subject the pop that others lenses can give. Examples of this would be on #3, #5, #6 and #12. Close cropping as mentioned above will tend to reduce some of this. I too have the 18-200 which I like, but it has limitations that you just learn to deal with and work around.

3. Faces, not backs. More times than not, a pleasing photo will show a persons face/front and not their backside. In your case, this includes photos #2, #4, and #10. I believe these would all look better from the front.

4. Exposure. It looks like it was a dark, cloudy day. Given the dirt, rocks, trees in the background, and dark clothing, some of your photos appear to be underexposed, particularly #7, #8, #10, and #12.

Overall you've got some nice photos here and I enjoyed viewing them.
 
Joined
Jun 12, 2007
Messages
1,217
Location
Not really sure . . Maybe I'm lost . . ! !
My advice . . . throw the general rule book out of the window . . you know the rule of thirds, always leave space for the bike/rider to move in to . . and develop your own still of shooting . .

You have some good shots here, no one can tell you what to do as the camera only records what you see . . but keep at it and have plenty of fun learning.

Personally I would have taken #6 similar to this . .

i-jFw5Hpk-XL.jpg
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Joined
Oct 19, 2010
Messages
100
Location
AK
Yeah I have a cropped version of #6 I couldn't decide which I liked better, I wanted to show how low he was to the ground since he was scrubbing.

It was a very dark and cloudy day, I also accidentally changed my exposure setting so a few of them are funky.

I think the biggest challenge is the background, getting a good enough depth of field to blur it adequately is tough but I'm working on it. I'm hoping when leaves appear the backgrounds will be a bit less distracting. Another thing is that photos will look excellent on my monitor which I have calibrated, but terrible or underexposed on others, when I get professional prints they always come out a little bit darker than what it looks like on my monitor... frustrating.

Thanks for all the advice
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2010
Messages
100
Location
AK
I actually don't know what the rule of thirds is, I basically bought a camera, figured out how to use it and learned about it and just starting taking pictures.


My advice . . . throw the general rule book out of the window . . you know the rule of thirds, always leave space for the bike/rider to move in to . . and develop your own still of shooting . .

You have some good shots here, no one can tell you what to do as the camera only records what you see . . but keep at it and have plenty of fun learning.

Personally I would have taken #6 similar to this . .

http://www.jasonscottphotography.com/photos/i-jFw5Hpk/0/XL/i-jFw5Hpk-XL.jpg
 
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
3,298
Location
Florida
+1 on what Pete and Jason said. I'd also cut way back on the vignettes in post. They are contributing to the already underexposed feel to many of the images.

tip...the best post production techniques yield results you cant tell were touched in post at all....
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2010
Messages
100
Location
AK
Ok, solid advice, I was trying to kinda wash out the background and make the rider stand out by the vignetting.. attempt failed...

+1 on what Pete and Jason said. I'd also cut way back on the vignettes in post. They are contributing to the already underexposed feel to many of the images.

tip...the best post production techniques yield results you cant tell were touched in post at all....
 
Joined
Apr 14, 2011
Messages
46
Location
Jakarta
Yeah, I love #2 the most too!
I think a bigger aperture would have given the subject a bit more "pop"/isolation - but probably more of the lens limitation (btw, I have exactly the 2 same lenses as you!).

I like #4 too, separation of the subject matter, with the background - can feel his flight!
 
Joined
Jan 8, 2009
Messages
5,301
Location
San Jose, CA
I think these shots are great. Certainly, shooting at f/2.8 or f/3.2 would help in killing your backgrounds. Otherwise, your timing seems to be pretty good, and you seem to know when to click the shutter.

You could also slow your shutter speed down and pan with the riders. That'll help kill (ie. blur) the background.

Good job!
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2010
Messages
100
Location
AK
I think these shots are great. Certainly, shooting at f/2.8 or f/3.2 would help in killing your backgrounds. Otherwise, your timing seems to be pretty good, and you seem to know when to click the shutter.

You could also slow your shutter speed down and pan with the riders. That'll help kill (ie. blur) the background.

Good job!


I'll try those, thanks.
 

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