My first cicada

Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
20,090
Location
Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
The 17-year cicadas began appearing in my neighborhood today. In fact, this was the very first one I saw. It's also the only cicada I've ever photographed.

Setup
The setup was the same for both photos and was so simple that a photograph of it isn't necessary. It was simply a continuous-light lamp very close to the subject on the left and another one also close on the right. The relatively large lamps compared to the small size of the subject were also so close to it that soft shadows were created. The lamp on the left was positioned to display the reflections on part of the wing to indicate that the wing's material is shiny. It was also positioned to display no shine in the rest of the wing to indicate that that material is also transparent. The tabletop made of a white card nicely lit the underside of the subject.

Focus Stacking
Photo #1: 50 focus-bracketed images at CamRanger step size Small stacked in Helicon Focus at its default settings.
Photo #2: The same as Photo #1 except only 40 images were captured.

Mike 2021-05-18--0003-S.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


Mike 2021-05-18--0002-S.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Last edited:
Uh-oh, if you're starting to see them in your neighborhood, I'll bet they'll be soon showing up in mine, too, since we don't live that far apart!! I am rather looking forward to seeing them and maybe taking a photo or two but have no intention of bringing one, dead or alive, into my house!!!! Any shots I get will be of the things outdoors in their native environment..... LOL!!! I have the feeling, too, that the novelty will wear off quite soon, too, as we begin seeing more and more and more and more.....
 
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
20,090
Location
Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
Considering that you took 40-50 images for focus stacking, the cicada must be dead.

It moved every once in awhile, which means it was either close to dead or was dead and experiencing some uncontrollable twitching. I had to do about three or four series of images for each final photo until I got one where the twitching either didn't cause a problem or was easy to fix during post-processing.

The problem with using the CamRanger is that it's far slower than using the focus-bracketing built into the Nikon cameras. So, the cicada's twitching was captured more often than if I had used Nikon's focus-bracketing. I couldn't do that because my Tamron macro lens will auto focus with my D7000 but not my Z6. So, I used the D7000, which doesn't have built-in focus bracketing, and the CamRanger.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
20,090
Location
Northern VA suburb of Washington, DC
you might want to explore one of those fascinating wings with a macro shot or two and ditto one of those incredible bright red eyes.....

Both photos were captured using a 90mm macro lens mounted on a camera with an APS-C sensor. Both images were cropped only to change the aspect ratio. The magnification ratio of the second photo was about 1:1.4, so the magnification isn't going to get a lot bigger, as this lens only goes to a 1:1 ratio. The eyes are only 1/16" (1.5mm) at the widest part.
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Nikon Cafe is a fan site and not associated with Nikon Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Forum GIFs powered by GIPHY: https://giphy.com/
Copyright © Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom