My GTO

Joined
Aug 23, 2011
Messages
93
Location
Wisconsin
Hi all,
I have been trying to get a couple decent shots of my car and have been struggling. I am looking for suggestions not so much on content, but pic quality.
These were shot with my Samyang 85mm f/1.4 ISO-400
Did I mention that I am a novice with my D200 and haven't mastered the menu's.:frown:

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Joined
May 16, 2006
Messages
899
As mentioned I would use a circular polarizer. I'd take multiple exposures with the polarizer removing the reflections on different surfaces and then stack them in Photoshop. I would also loosen up the crop, give the shot some background. The back of the car gets pretty blurry, use a smaller aperture to get more of it in focus. The white balance looks a little yellow to me.

Really nice car. It's good to have something like that to practice your shots on.
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2012
Messages
586
Location
Atlanta, GA
Ideally, you need to move back a few feet, and use a CPL and a tripod. Cars are highly reflective, and a CPL helps you control the reflections. Shoot at your lowest native ISO to keep noise down. Shoot the car in 2-3 frames, rotating the CPL a little bit for each shot. Kill the reflections from the windshield first, then the hood, then the side of the car. Shoot in RAW, as red cars tend to get oversaturated. Take your frames into PS and blend them in.
 
Joined
Aug 23, 2011
Messages
93
Location
Wisconsin
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
Rick pretty nice car, I like the second shot and the shifter shot. Lots of glare in the first shot, maybe a circular polarizer would help.
Thanks for the compliment on the car. I did a frame off (resto-mod) that was a 8 year project that I finished two years ago. My mother bought the car new in 68. I bought the car from her in 76 and owned it for 14 years. I sold the car in 1990 and bought it back in 2001 and started the resto. It was a fun project and I did all the work myself aside from the transmission and welding in all the new metal, and it needed a lot.

I have never used any polarized filters, but will check into one.
Rick
 
Joined
Aug 23, 2011
Messages
93
Location
Wisconsin
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #6
As mentioned I would use a circular polarizer. I'd take multiple exposures with the polarizer removing the reflections on different surfaces and then stack them in Photoshop. I would also loosen up the crop, give the shot some background. The back of the car gets pretty blurry, use a smaller aperture to get more of it in focus. The white balance looks a little yellow to me.

Really nice car. It's good to have something like that to practice your shots on.
I will try a polarizer but I don't have photoshop, I only have Lightroom 4.4. As far as cropping, you are right, but i did not have an ideal location when these were shot or I would have left more of the background. I also noticed I had the white balance in manual mode which wasn't ideal.

I had the ISO at 400 since it was a cloudy day and wonder if I shoud have used my SB-600 for fill?
Rick
 
Joined
Aug 23, 2011
Messages
93
Location
Wisconsin
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
Ideally, you need to move back a few feet, and use a CPL and a tripod. Cars are highly reflective, and a CPL helps you control the reflections. Shoot at your lowest native ISO to keep noise down. Shoot the car in 2-3 frames, rotating the CPL a little bit for each shot. Kill the reflections from the windshield first, then the hood, then the side of the car. Shoot in RAW, as red cars tend to get oversaturated. Take your frames into PS and blend them in.
David, I did use a tripod, but need to get a CPL. I thought that setting the ISO to 400 would help the fact that it was overcast. I will try setting at ISO-100 with a flash and see how that works. I always shoot in raw but don't have any way to blend multiple shots.
Rick
 
Joined
Jan 25, 2009
Messages
1,496
Those were wonderful cars.... and '68 was one of the best years.
 
Joined
Aug 23, 2011
Messages
93
Location
Wisconsin
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
I see CPL filters are all over the board on prices. So how much do I need to spend to get a filter that will do the job? They range from $6.99 to well over $100.00
 
Joined
Feb 6, 2009
Messages
818
Location
Texas!
I see CPL filters are all over the board on prices. So how much do I need to spend to get a filter that will do the job? They range from $6.99 to well over $100.00
You'll get lots of opinions on this one. Based on this thorough comparison my choice is the Marumi DHG. It ranked 4th overall, beating out some far more expensive filters. Note that prices in the 2009 review cited are in Polish currency (the zloty), but are relative to each other.

While the DHG 'Super' tied for 1st overall, it ranked only 3.4 percentage points higher, and from the US seller cited in the link above, sells for $114, vs. $79 for the 'plain' DHG, each 77mm in size. Both are excellent CPL's.

I've made several purchases from the linked seller, always quickly receiving exactly what I ordered. I have no ties with them other than being a satisfied customer and recommend them based on my experiences.

hth,
 
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