National Museum of the US Air Force - Part 1 Props

Joined
Jan 18, 2008
Messages
2,493
Location
Denmark
For 25 years the Air Force Museum has been on my list to see, and I finally made the drive to see it. I had brought all my camera gear since I was driving, and I had set all day aside for it. I arrived just before 10 AM and it was raining a lot. The non handicap parking is a block away from the entrance, so I grabbed what I thought was the D700 with the Zeiss 35 f2 and my tripod and made a run for the entrance. I had all day, so I would have plenty of time to return with a different lens later. Right!? After an hour or so I came by the lobby and noticed the rain had stopped, a good opportunity to go to the car and offload the card to the computer and get a dry shirt and shoes. it is not until I hook up the camera to the laptop that I discover I have been shooting with the D300 not the D700. Without the tripod I would have known sooner. I had found a bit wider would have been helpful, so I put the 35 on the D700 and went back in. Surprisingly I did not find myself longing for the flexibility and wider angle of the zoom. By the time they close, I thought I had seen everything inside. It wasn't until my friend Andy called, on my way back to Columbus, and asked if I had seen the B-36 Peacemaker, that I realized I had missed the entire Cold War hangar. I simply ran out of time.

EXIF is intact, all with either D300 or 700 and Zeiss 35 f2, and a tripod. Don't even think of going without a tripod, it is very very dark. I don't think I have a single exposure faster than half a second, most are 1-3 and some are 8-10.

1.
picture-1.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


2.
picture-2.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


3.
picture-25.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


4.
picture-29.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


5.
picture-30.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


6.
picture-23.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


7.
picture-24.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


8.
picture-28.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


I will follow up with separate threads for the early planes and the jets. There are already a handful of photos in the Nose Art Thread.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Joined
Jan 18, 2008
Messages
2,493
Location
Denmark
Great work!
I love the P-39 display & your shot...:smile: A-36 is a classic too!

Thanks, I knew I had a lot of ground to cover and did not read all the placards. The A-36 looked like a third cousin to a Mustang, your clue gave me what I needed to look it up. I always liked the look of the P-39. My brother built a very nice Monogram 1/48 scale model of it as a kid.

Below a P-63E Kingcobra.

wonderful shots, love the color, contrast and detail, great comp as well. is that a PBY? Anyway, was this all without a flash?
The 35ZF is on my short list.
Thanks, nice job

Thanks. No flash, just long shutter at ISO 200. The Zeiss 35 f2 is a gem, I have had a lot of fun with it. It is a PBY Catalina, there is more of it in the link to the Nose Art thread.

Very nice shots.

Thanks, it was a lot of fun. I wish I had taken a second day to see the rest.

picture-55.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


picture-56.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Joined
Jan 25, 2009
Messages
1,496
Wonderful job at capturing the exhibits in that dark hangar. Do they still have exhibits parked outside?
 
Joined
Jan 18, 2008
Messages
2,493
Location
Denmark
If memory serves correct,
Russia used the P-63 extensively while the USAAF rarely/barely used it.....

I need to visit that museum :smile:

You are correct, there is a Wikipedia link to the history in the previous link. The P-63 is considerably larger than the P-39.

Wonderful job at capturing the exhibits in that dark hangar. Do they still have exhibits parked outside?

Thanks, and you aren't kidding about the space being dark, couldn't have done it without a tripod. I thought I saw some transports driving up in the rain, but I did not pay close attention.

C-124 Globemaster
picture-62.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


That is a Mosquito parked behind the Spitfire and a P-38 Lightning with the blue spinner in the background on the right.
picture-50.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Joined
Jan 18, 2008
Messages
2,493
Location
Denmark
Really nice shots, didn't realize the US used the English Spitfires in WWII..???

Thanks. It surprised me too, but I did not get a chance too read up on the details. There were so many planes I had not seen before.

Pretty cool shooting in such a dark looking location.. Kinda sucks that these are not flight worthy.

Thanks. It would be even better if they were all flight worthy. I am pretty sure most are not. I did not see any drip pans or pools of oil under any of them. Anytime you see an operational one there is loads of oil underneath. I came home with an oily backside Saturday from having been on my back in the grass for a low shot. I had not spotted the mess, but did notice before I got in the car.

Sorry no prop blur, even at 2.5 second shutter speed.
picture-59.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


That will buff out. This was lit with orange yellow light, and had the color you see.
picture-60.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


picture-61.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Joined
Sep 25, 2005
Messages
4,288
Location
St. Louis, MO USA
Great batch of photos! Don't know if I would have had the patience for tripod AND waiting for no other visitors around.

It has been several years since I was there, looks like lots of new displays - your shots are making me want to go back.

Thanks for sharing.

Don
 
Joined
Jan 18, 2008
Messages
2,493
Location
Denmark
Really nice shots, didn't realize the US used the English Spitfires in WWII..???

The museum website has loads of information, but it is not always easy to find. I just found the detail page for the Spitfire in the photo. I can't say it helps much, as it says the particular plane flew for the Royal Australian Air Force, and I don't think we are looking at Australian markings.

%$#@!

I missed this during a visit to the States a few years ago. Now I can REALLY kick myself, as it's even better than I thought!

:tongue:

Thanks Bernard. You will be sore from the kicking, I have lot's of photos I haven't shared yet. I am debating whether I should make a separate thread with the German planes or just lump them in here. I think I will do a new thread for them, as there are both jets and prop planes represented.

Great batch of photos! Don't know if I would have had the patience for tripod AND waiting for no other visitors around.

It has been several years since I was there, looks like lots of new displays - your shots are making me want to go back.

Thanks for sharing.

Don

Thanks Don. Funny you mention people blocking your shot. I had been concerned about that, but also puzzled every time other people have posted from here, that I saw so few people. I only had one case where a family of fat people, with a stroller thrown in for good measure, decided to take up position in my shot, and they stayed there until I gave up. I shoot have started taking flash photos to make them get the point. :rolleyes:

The museum attracts 1,300,000 visitors a year, which averages to about 3,500 a day. You would think it would look crowded, but it doesn't. It is so huge you can walk around like you are the only person there, on a rainy Monday anyway.

Trust me you will want a tripod.

Here is a Martin YB-10
picture-48.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


picture-49.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Joined
Jul 16, 2009
Messages
10,094
Location
Newcastle
The museum website has loads of information, but it is not always easy to find. I just found the detail page for the Spitfire in the photo. I can't say it helps much, as it says the particular plane flew for the Royal Australian Air Force, and I don't think we are looking at Australian markings.

The picture shows the Spitfire with RAF-style identification codes and 1941 pattern camouflage (later in the war, the 'sky blue' and brown were changed to light & dark grey), so I think it's painted to represent one of the Eagle Squadrons' aircraft rather than its actual history...

See this one for example :smile:
 
Joined
Jan 18, 2008
Messages
2,493
Location
Denmark
The picture shows the Spitfire with RAF-style identification codes and 1941 pattern camouflage (later in the war, the 'sky blue' and brown were changed to light & dark grey), so I think it's painted to represent one of the Eagle Squadrons' aircraft rather than its actual history...

See this one for example :smile:

That makes sense, there was a second Spitfire next to the Mosquito and they were both in the dark and light grey combination. I needed a wider angle to get them and I don't think I have a single shot that shows them clearly.

Thanks very much Tom. Looking forward to them all :smile:

Here are a couple more then.

Fascinating stuff and great shots.

Thanks Daryl.

Douglas B-18 Bolo developed to replace the Martin B-10 in my last post
picture-58.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


That is a Mitsubishi A6M2 Zero hiding under the wing of the Bolo
picture-57.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


Curtis P-40E Warhawk
picture-27.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Joined
Nov 10, 2008
Messages
3,969
Location
Chicago
Bring the 8mm lens or panorama set up for the B36. It stretches wall to wall. It was a monster, but flew like a dream.

I remember being on a picnic as a kid, 1950 or so and one flew overhead. No big deal except it launched 2 of those little captive air defense fighters. I remember it to this day.
That program was abandoned before going into production.

I also remember seeing four F86D in formation going over my house where we lived from 1949 to 1955. They were less than 1000 feet. Probably based at at what is now O Hare field which was all military then. The D was distinctive as it was an interceptor version with a hugh radar dome in the nose in place of the small lip. The pilots all had crew cuts too! That low.

Anyway go back and see the X15, X1, and all the more modern stuff. My last trip there was 25 years ago.

http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/Aircraft/Convair-B36.html

Guess it carried a F84 also. F85 Goblin was the defensive fighter.

http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/Aircraft/McDonnell-F85.html
 

Latest posts

Links on this page may be to our affiliates. Sales through affiliate links may benefit this site.
Nikon Cafe is a fan site and not associated with Nikon Corporation.
Forum post reactions by Twemoji: https://github.com/twitter/twemoji
Forum GIFs powered by GIPHY: https://giphy.com/
Copyright © Amin Forums, LLC
Top Bottom