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Need help with Nikon 60mm f/2.8

Discussion in 'Macro, Flowers, Insects, and Greenery' started by snapdecision, Sep 8, 2008.

  1. Hello all,

    I just received a 60mm f/2.8 from eBay and mounted it on my D2x and I'm unable to get the lens to stay at f/2.8. In aperture priority it will only stay at 2.8 at infinity. As soon as I start focusing it will start stopping down the aperture. It does this on my D1x also. Is this normal for Digital camera's?

    Thanks,

    Vince
     
  2. Not to worry, it's not a lens problem. It's normal for any macro lens on any camera, Vince, digital or film. If your target is at least 3 or 4 feet away, you'll be able to access f/2.8. But when you focus on something very close, you'll notice the lens barrel extends. That's what causes the max aperture to decrease.
     
  3. Many thanks!

    I had one of these when I shot film but sold it because I never used it. I never knew that this lens would not stay constant but it makes sense with a macro.

    Thanks again. I wanted to make sure before I sent it back. So far, it seems to work properly.

    Best,

    Vince
     
  4. I have to chuckle, because everyone who buys their first dedicated macro lens has the same reaction... including me :biggrin:. I hope you enjoy your 60/2.8. It's terrific for product photography and portraits as well as macros.
     
  5. rotxlk82

    rotxlk82

    Jul 20, 2007
    UK
    As Frank has said this is a totally normal thing that you just have to accept when working with macro lenses, there are countless threads in the archives here in which people have assumed that their lens is faulty in some way as they're not getting the F-numbers that they expect.

    If you one of those people who like to know why this is the case I suggest this thread on Nikonians http://www.nikonians.org/forums/dcb...&forum=146&topic_id=13313&mesg_id=13313&page= which has some indepth discussion on the 'real' apetures of macro lenses.
     
  6. lisa_h

    lisa_h

    346
    Sep 6, 2008
    New England
    It is not a constant aperture. Only 2.8 at infinity. I was annoyed when I got mine as well but soon figured out you don't need it at 2.8 to get gorgeous backgroud blur. It's an amazing lens.
     
  7. The Nikonians article was very helpful - Thank you.

    I bought this lens because I'm doing a website and a brochure for a local farmer here in Florida. I'll be taking pictures of a variety of Heirloom tomatoes and herbs. Some will be taken at the farm, and some brought back to the studio to isolate the tomatoes on a white background.

    If you haven't tried an Heirloom tomato—you should! They have the most amazing flavor. I grew up not liking tomatoes, but now I eat them everyday.

    I'll post pictures when they are done.

    Best to all.
     
  8. mcwong

    mcwong

    50
    Nov 2, 2008
    Sacramento
    great lens for sure.
     
  9. kiankheong

    kiankheong

    148
    Nov 19, 2007
    Malaysia
    The thing that got most people confused about macro lenses is the aperture value.

    There are in fact two types of aperture values: effective aperture (governing exposure) and actual aperture (how wide is the diaphragm opened).

    In macro mode, the closer you get to your subject, the exposure actually reduces and this is visible even through the viewfinder. Most modern lenses have a neat trick that communicate this change of exposure directly to the camera. The display on your camera shows the effective aperture, not the actual aperture.

    So, you may actually have your lens wide open at f/2.8 (and it will still gives an excellent bokeh, albeit at reduced DOF) but your camera indicates a value of f/5.6 (effective aperture) to compensate for the reduce exposure.

    :smile:
     
  10. I found one of these lenses on Craigslist. It came with a Hoya circular polarizer and a uv filter for $200.00. I haven't had much time to try the macro feature, but on my way home from buying the lens, I took this picture with a D80. It seems to be an extremely sharp lens, and I think that I'm going to get a lot of great images with it. Focus seems fast and accurate. Hunts a bit with macro.

    God Bless America,
    robert

    3003897181_5b04feb9cb_b.png
    Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
     
  11. Last edited by a moderator: Mar 15, 2017
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