Never take a picture...

Joined
Jan 26, 2005
Messages
1,011
Location
San Jose, CA
Never take a picture when you can take two... particularly for posed shots. If there's more than one person in the frame, you can count on somebody blinking or frowning at just the wrong time.

I had a small job today... some memory shots for the manager of a local store who's moving out of state... and taking double shots, along with Photoshop, saved my bacon.

Here's a shot of the manager and her staff. I caught the folks in positions 4 and 5 with unhappy expressions on their faces.

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


I turned to my second shot, but didn't like the expressions on positions 2, 3, and 6.

View attachment 11608

Fortunately, I could find a good expression for each position on one of the pictures, so I grafted heads from shot #1 to shot #2, and then polished up the composite. Since the shots were taken from slightly different distances, I had to use the free transform tool to resize the replacement heads.

View attachment 11609

Here's another example from the same set. This is a shot of the outgoing manager and her successor.

The outgoing manager's eyes were nearly closed the first take.

View attachment 11610

The incoming manager didn't have a good expression in the second take.

View attachment 11611

The head positions had shifted slightly and the exposure levels were significantly different. By using the free transform tool to tilt the grafted head, and the levels tool to adjust the brightness/contrast, I was able to get a reasonable match for the composite.

View attachment 11612

It just takes a few seconds to grab that second shot, but it can save you from having to go back and re-shoot later.
 
Joined
Jan 26, 2005
Messages
373
You bet. Several shots with groups is best out. Take a couple extra by having everyone look down with their eyes closed and on three, look up with a smile and open eyes. The act will get the smile and a better chance for no blinks. I've done group shots with one person missing and added them in later. Plan for a space, photograph them later against a solid backdrop, cut & paste. Dropping the person in behind the group (head and shoulder) is easiest.
 
Joined
Jan 26, 2005
Messages
1,011
Location
San Jose, CA
Thanks, Frank & Ray! The process is actually easier than it looks, and it's worth spending the time to learn it. If you can get your hands on one of Scott Kelby's books, he does a great job of explaining it.
 

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