New stdio setup, are these ok?

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May 15, 2008
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Dandridge, Tn
I just got a 3 flash setup from eBay. Yes its a cheap one. But I am learning alot, like,,,, I dont need 3 strobes!! Modeling lights get hot as hell! Poly backgrounds are poopoo! But I am having a crap ton of fun. So how do these pics look? These are straight from my d200 with a Sigma 18-50mm f2.8. I shot these on manual mode, f8 160sec, white balance set on flash mode. Anything I should know? Any good insite out there?

Me
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Miss Molly
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Jun 7, 2008
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Connecticut/North Carolina
If you can, bring your subject away from the backdrop, and with that lens try f4 or 5.6 and see how that looks. The third light can be used as a hair light or to brighten the background . The closer you are to the subject the higher the f/stop for everything to be in focus. Have fun experimenting!
 
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Dandridge, Tn
yeah, for the first one, I focused on the wall and then set the time to get in front of the camera. I reall need a person to stand in from of the lens for me. Thanks for your input.

Thanks Chuck
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2008
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Outer Los Angeles
Other than focusing on the wall, I'd say you did quite well. You have nice, even lighting and good exposure.

As time goes on, you'll experiment with moving the lights around and/or setting them at different intensities; gobos, snoots, barndoors and other methods for controling where the light goes; shoot-through umbrellas and screens, reflectors and using odd items for light effects (bottles filled with water, etc.)

Shooting studio strobes is a lot of fun. I did a lot of it back in college, and just a couple weeks ago received a set of strobes from Adorama. Not very powerful, but I'm already having tons of fun with them.

Enjoy your lights to the fullest.
 
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Orlando, FL
As others have said . . . step away from the background :smile: Other than that, I'd say a good effort.

Now go to just one light and practice moving it around to achieve specific lighting patterns (loop, closed loop, split, Rembrandt, Butterfly etc.). Get yourself a mannikin head for practice - they are invaluable. Get a good lighting book - there are a bunch out there.

Play with flash power and positions so that you light - or do not light any of the background. Bring back the other lights for fill, hair, background - but I recommend you get it down with one light first.
 
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Devizes, Wiltshire, UK
Hi drschurch,

I have the Elinchrom D-Lite 2 studio kit and bought it for my Children and Grandchildren.

I prefer to have a black background which seems to give a better overall perspective.

Here is a picture of me with one of my Daughters behind me, my Son, Daughter in Law to be and Grandsons, taken earlier this year using my two light set up:

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As others have mentioned it is all about distance and getting the lights correctly placed. A friend of mine who is a professional tog prefers one studio light behind him when he is taking a photo.

Here is a pic he took earlier this year using my set up, but only one light behind him of his and my Daughters:

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Regards

Chris
 
R

RichNY

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Another tip, move your light higher so the catchlights in the eyes are at 10-11 or 1-2 o'clock.
 
Joined
May 15, 2008
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Dandridge, Tn
Thanks for all the tips guys. So sad for me I cant move my lights any higher(I have 7 foot ceilings). I have some of my friends coming over this week to help me experiment with my lights. If I get anything good I will let you see them.
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2008
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Devizes, Wiltshire, UK
Thanks for all the tips guys. So sad for me I cant move my lights any higher(I have 7 foot ceilings). I have some of my friends coming over this week to help me experiment with my lights. If I get anything good I will let you see them.
Hi,

Just show us anyway!

Regards

Chris
 
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Dandridge, Tn
OK a couple from last week

Harley
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And Kimberly
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Devizes, Wiltshire, UK
Hi Harley,

Superb! TBH I think your lighting is just right! In the next session get the subject away from the back drop but try and get the lighting just as good. Looking forward to the next try!

Best regards

Chris
 
Joined
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Dandridge, Tn
Thanks Chris!! How far away should I keep my subjects from the backdrop, and why is that a good idea? I think I might need to go buy a book.

Thanks Church
 
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Mar 31, 2007
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Middle Tennessee
The best answer for the distance is the shadows fall away from the image and are not seen. A bonus answer is that the DOF will allow the background to fall out of focus, and not reveal wrinkles or imperfections.

I try for around 5 to 6 feet away. Hang the drop so that is is as wide as possible.

Shoot away, shoot away!!!

How far is Dandridge from Nashville? just curious...
 
Joined
Jul 6, 2008
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Devizes, Wiltshire, UK
Hi Church,

Beaten to it!

Basically you are trying to make the back drop not be part of the picture, 5 - 6 ft will help this with along with a back light if you can.

See these sites:

http://www.ephotozine.com/article/Studio-Lighting---Part-1

http://www.ephotozine.com/article/Studio-lighting-on-a-budget

And this article:

http://gkdigital.co.uk/doc/StudioPortraitCourseReview.pdf

Experiment with a smaller dof by lowering your aperture. I normally take at about 5.6 or less. Not saying this is correct btw, just how I do it.

I am sure someone more experienced will be along soon to give a more detailed description.

Best regards

Chris
 
Joined
May 15, 2008
Messages
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Location
Dandridge, Tn
I am 20 minutes east of Knoxville. Right at the base of the Smokey Mountains.

The best answer for the distance is the shadows fall away from the image and are not seen. A bonus answer is that the DOF will allow the background to fall out of focus, and not reveal wrinkles or imperfections.

I try for around 5 to 6 feet away. Hang the drop so that is is as wide as possible.

Shoot away, shoot away!!!

How far is Dandridge from Nashville? just curious...
 
Joined
Dec 4, 2006
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Texas!
The picture of the puppy is cute. Although try putting him about 3 feet away from that backdrop.
 
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