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Review Nikon 200mm f/4 QC

Discussion in 'Reviews, Tests, & Shootouts' started by gryphon1911, Dec 4, 2018.

  1. Image © KEH.com
    Background
    Another lens picked up for a little bit of nothing. I figure, why not check it out. For the price let's see what this very light 200mm f/4 lens can do.

    Handling/Size/Weight
    Long and slim, this 200mm f/4 QC lens may look a bit odd when compared to modern lens standards. Heck even compared to the legacy Nikon 180mm f/2.8 ED lens, it looks way different. It does handle relatively well, with everything you'd want in very familiar places.

    Given it's relative size, you'd expect this metal lens to weigh more than it feels like it does. It is very deceptive in that way.


    Image Quality
    One would hope that the wide open performance of this lens would be acceptable. What great find it would be to have a 200mm f/4 on a DSLR or even a 400mm f/4 field of view on a Micro Four Thirds mirrorless camera.

    How does the lens perform? See what we were able to pull from it below.

    Some samples of the lens adapted to the Olympus PEN-F and Fotodiox adapter. We are looking at a 400mm field of view. Processed in Lightroom.


    09-23-2017_PENF_slaterun_P9230005.jpg
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    1/400, f/4, ISO 200

    09-23-2017_PENF_slaterun_P9230010.jpg
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    1/160, f/4, ISO 200

    09-23-2017_PENF_slaterun_P9230017.jpg
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    1/160, f/4, ISO 200

    Now, let's look at what it can do on the Nikon Df.
    11-26-2017_Df_street_mf_DSC_9297.jpg
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    1/500, f/4, ISO 100

    11-26-2017_Df_street_mf_DSC_9301.jpg
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    1/400, f/5.6, ISO 100

    11-26-2017_Df_street_mf_DSC_9309.jpg
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    1/200, f/4, ISO 560

    11-26-2017_Df_street_mf_DSC_9310.jpg
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    1/400, f/4, ISO 100

    11-26-2017_Df_street_mf_DSC_9322.jpg
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    1/500, f/8, ISO 4500

    11-26-2017_Df_street_mf_DSC_9325.jpg
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    1/500, f/8, ISO 5000

    11-26-2017_Df_street_mf_DSC_9330.jpg
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    1/500, f/8, ISO 1800

    11-26-2017_Df_street_mf_DSC_9338.jpg
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    1/500, f/5.6, ISO 5600

    Focusing
    I found the manual focusing of this lens to be a bit better than that of the Nikon 300/4.5 AI. It is similar in feel to the Nikon 105/2.5 and the 135/3.5 Q.

    It gets the job done for you with a decently dampened focus ring, and at the end of the day that is a testament to the Nikon build quality.


    Bottom Line
    If prime lenses are your thing, like or don't mind using manual focus lenses check this one out. For the price you pay, you still get one heck of a lens that will probably still be working long after most of us are no longer breathing.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Great write-up. My 200/4 was always with me and my F3 - I didn't leave home without it. I've thought of getting it "chipped" along with the 105/2.5 and 28/2.8 - I think you just gave me the impetus to do it. Thanks!
     
    • Appreciate Appreciate x 1
  3. What do these lenses do when “chipped”?
     
  4. Don't you have a Z6 now? I would like to hear how it handles on that.

    I have several AI and AI-s lenses that provide some impetus toward a Z6 purchase: 24/2.8, 35/2.0, 55/3.5 micro, 105/2.5, 135/3.5, and 200/4.
     
  5. On a Nikon camera, a "chipped" lens supplies aperture information to the camera so the automatic exposure features will work (A, S, and P modes).
     
  6. And in the case of the Df and Z6/Z7 with FTZ adapter, it will allow for the camera to control the aperture from the command dial and not only from the aperture ring.
     
  7. I have have used the 300/4.5 AI and the 20/3.5 AIS on the Z6 so far. Those work just fine, even the 300/4.5 worked well given it's weight and size.

    I too have the 55/3.5 Micro, 105/2.5 and 135/3.5. I still have the 200/4 QC. Those are all on the list to be tested (I've already used the 135/3.5 on the Z and it is brilliant), plus some additional manual focus lenses (28/2.8 AIS, Mitakon Creator 85/2 are some others).

    I'm creating a Flickr album with all the shots I've taken with adapted lenses on the Z6. The newest ones are with the 135mm f/3.5 AIS, the older ones are with the 70-300/4.5-5.6 AF-P VR lens(as of right now, anyway). More images will be added to the album as I get the chance to test them out.

    Nikon Z Adapted Lenses

    The only lens that I have that I will not attach just yet is the Nikon 35mm f/2.8 Nikkor-S Auto because it is on the "not compatible" list from Nikon and I'm not 100% sure why. Talking with some more knowledgeable MF Nikkor shooters than me has indicated that there may be protrusions in the rear mount that could damage the FTZ adapter. Not sure what the deal is, but that same 35/2.8 Nikkor-S Auto works just fine on the Df and has no limitation. If I get good information on it being OK (it seems Nikon's official list is very conservative) I will test it out on the Z6 ASAP.
     
  8. Let me know if you find a reputable place that is not super expensive. I could only find one place on the internet that said they did the chipping/conversions but they wanted between $75-$100USD for the work.

    I was thinking of getting the older pre-AI lenses AI'd and that only costs between $25 and $25 per lens to do. I've held off on all that for the time being.
     
  9. Do you find it easy to nail focus on the Z6 with these lenses?
     
  10. Absolutely. I usually use the "low" focus peaking, but employ "standard" when the contrast is lower and I need help. Plus the ability to zoom in with the + button on the back helps a ton. I use the Yellow peaking option.
     
  11. I believe "chipping" also provides exif info. Legacy2digital is more expensive, but I've heard good things about them. The 105/2.5 and 200/4 are considered level 2 @ $149.00+/per lens.
     
  12. Yes, they provide EXIF data automatically for those cameras were entering it into the non-CPU data menu option is not available.
     
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