Nikon GP-1 GPS unit - how much will that thing cost?

Discussion in 'Nikon DX DSLR' started by Dr A, Aug 27, 2008.

  1. Dr A

    Dr A

    695
    Feb 2, 2008
    State College, PA
  2. Last edited by a moderator: Mar 15, 2017
  3. MikeG76

    MikeG76

    950
    Jun 11, 2008
    Middletown, NY
    there's a competing product that also attaches to the hot-shoe, the name escapes me, but it ran for like $300. Hopefully, it will be considerably less.
     
  4. Dr A

    Dr A

    695
    Feb 2, 2008
    State College, PA
    I remember this as well. I think I saw it on Terry White's blog:

    http://terrywhite.com/techblog/?p=406
     
  5. Sam O

    Sam O

    632
    Jul 24, 2007
    Toronto
    I have the Dawn-Tech N2-Di GPS, it works great. Won't be replacing it until it breaks.
     
  6. Leif

    Leif

    Feb 12, 2006
    England
    I was excited until I saw that it only supports WGS84 making it useless for my intended use of botanical recording. There is also no mention of the sensitivity. Will it work under tree cover? Or in a canyon? Or in New York city among skyscrapers.

    It looks to be crippled when compared to even the cheapest standalone GPS unit such as the £75 Garmin H unit I bought last month. Pity.
     
  7. :confused::confused:

    Would you please enlighten us? What is WGS84 and why is that a limitation?

    Thanks.
     
  8. mattsteg

    mattsteg

    455
    Aug 10, 2007
    MN
    WGS84 is a particular reference datum used to express position on earth. It's the most commonly used standard, but there are plenty of other ways to express your position. Since you can translate between the various representations, I'm not sure why it would be a showstopper, other than adding an extra processing step to translate to whatever he's using.
     
  9. Leif

    Leif

    Feb 12, 2006
    England
    Coordinates are not absolutes, but are given in a particular representation. For example, if like me you are in the UK, you might wish to use the representation used by Ordnance Survey maps, as that would allow you to find the location on a standard map. But if you gave me a coordinate in WGS84, it could differ significantly from the UK map coordinate for the same place. Or,looking at it another way, a set of coordinates in one systems do not correspond to the same place in another system.

    As to why there are different coordinate systems, well they are latitudes and longitudes plotted on a flattened spheroid that represents the shape of the Earth. Different systems choose different spheroids, sometimes due to better measurements of the Earths gravitational field and shape. To complicate matters the UK map system uses a representation that is better suited to the UK, rather than the world as a whole.
     
  10. Leif

    Leif

    Feb 12, 2006
    England
    Exactly. I would have to post-process the data, which defeats the point. At least for me it does. It is easier to get the 'correct' value in the first place.
     
  11. adrianaitken

    adrianaitken Guest

    Who says it can only do WGS84 ? Nikon's press release says...
    No mention of compass heading which is a lost opertunity I think. I also think I read it was Sirf III which is the 'canyon-busting' version of GPS.
     
  12. Leif

    Leif

    Feb 12, 2006
    England
    This is from the Nikon USA site:

    "Geotag (image positioning information of pictures such as latitude, longitude [Geodetic System WGS84]) can be added to the image."

    They make no mention of the sensitivity, so I hope you are right.
     
  13. Ricardo

    Ricardo

    27
    Feb 7, 2006
    Bermuda
    Mine broke and they fixed it for free. Actually I damaged the cord. It used to jot out of the side and since I left it on the camera, it got damaged by "shoveling" my camera in & out of my bag. They put a new cord on it that jots up instead of sideways . . . much better in my opinion. :smile:
     
  14. adrianaitken

    adrianaitken Guest

    Leif, according to the OS website
    I think there may be confusion as to WGS84. It can be lat/long or Cartesian system and since Nikon says lat/long I am pretty sure they mean (what I'd call) normal GPS measurements.

    The OS link is http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/oswebsite/gps/information/coordinatesystemsinfo/guidecontents/guide4.html

    Of course I could be wrong and Nikon has shot itself in the foot.....
     
  15. mattsteg

    mattsteg

    455
    Aug 10, 2007
    MN
    Depending on situation, easily-automated post-processing plus using a convenient device could trump getting the data right initially with a less convenient device. FWIW the di-GPS appears to be WGS84 only as well. I would suspect that being fixed to WGS84 is a common limitation of low-cost devices. Implementing the ability to change to less-used datums adds a (relative) ton of complexity - without that capability you don't really need the ability for it to take input at all. If anything, it would probably be easier to implement different datums on the camera, not the GPS.