Nikon had a terrible sales quarter and is revising forward estimates.

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True. However, all camera manufacturers are in the same boat. Some are doing better navigating those waters than others.
Apple, Samsung, Google, Sony are not.
Their cameras collect users data (I includkng smartphones).
The market for taking photos is not restricted to the classic manufacturers.
Tom and others cannot limit their analyses to canon, Nikon and sony and cherry pick weaknesses against smartphones, connected devices, AI based software while partially ignoring the elephant in the room, the smartphone in everyone’s pocket.
It is akin to analysing the Trainline market ignoring airlines, cars, cruise ships...
 
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I really like this point that Thom Hogan makes.... "As I've tried to point out for over a decade, the other big pain point is workflow. Yes, that means that some people want to immediately have something shared, without having to pull out another device and doing any work on it. But they also want things backed up automatically (where's the Time Machine equivalent for cameras? iPhones have Apple iCloud Photos, after all. Funny thing is, Nikon has Nikon Image Space and Canon just shut down their cloud approach. The problem isn't the cloud, it's how you use it and don't require the user to do anything).

The list of things that the camera could help with downstream of actually taking the photo is actually pretty extensive, but nothing regarding workflow is being done by camera makers. That's software, after all, and the Japanese camera makers think they only make and sell hardware. No, they sell useful (or non-useful) products, and these days in tech, that means software that makes hardware solve problems, do chores, make decisions."


When we go on our Redfish vacation with the kids each summer, everyone used to like to see my photos on Facebook/Instagram after we got home and I had a chance to post process them. Now the kids all took photos with their phones, shared them with other family members instantly on Facebook/Instagram, and by the time I got home, my photos seemed like ancient history and I didn't even get them all post processed. I can relate to Thom's comment about people wanting to immediately be able to share. That is the way the world works now, like it or not. Why couldn't a camera have the capability of instantly sharing to social media? I think the camera companies have got to look outside the box. Business as usual won't attract many younger users.
I think you describe one of the main reasons why traditional non smartphone cameras are becoming niche or obsolete.
From drawings to paintings to photography each evolution of the technology has brought immense benefits that pushed the previous technology into a niche (to be compensated for by growing population and hopefully increasing disposable income).
In an instant sharing world, what is the need for a device that captures memories but can't share without too lengthy a delay?
Not only that but how can a device that require human operation BY HAND, compete with remote controlled drones ?
Finally, once the entire planet has been photographed and shared online, what's the point of anything but a smartphone for selfie and video (we will be able to simply order an AI montaged photo of ourselves in any specific location) ?
 
Finally, once the entire planet has been photographed and shared online
I get your valid point. However, as I write this I am sitting within reach of many unique objects that have never been photographed including three baseballs, a baseball glove, two empty wine bottles, several framed prints, a hat, and a slew of other items.
 
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I think you describe one of the main reasons why traditional non smartphone cameras are becoming niche or obsolete.
From drawings to paintings to photography each evolution of the technology has brought immense benefits that pushed the previous technology into a niche (to be compensated for by growing population and hopefully increasing disposable income).
In an instant sharing world, what is the need for a device that captures memories but can't share without too lengthy a delay?
Not only that but how can a device that require human operation BY HAND, compete with remote controlled drones ?
Finally, once the entire planet has been photographed and shared online, what's the point of anything but a smartphone for selfie and video (we will be able to simply order an AI montaged photo of ourselves in any specific location) ?
I get your valid point. However, as I write this I am sitting within reach of many unique objects that have never been photographed including three baseballs, a baseball glove, two empty wine bottles, several framed prints, a hat, and a slew of other items.
The tools of art change with our notions of what "art" is. Not so many decades ago Jackson Pollack would have been dismissed as a failed house painter. And most here will remember the the great debates over whether photography was "art". Photography won that debate and is firmly rooted as an art form. But, for many today, still images are simply a visual phone call. The idea of "perfecting" such an image is outside of the worldview of folks who consider selfies the whole point of having a camera built-in to their phones. Enthusiasts such as us are a dwindling demographic. I'm OK with that. I indulge in other niche activities and have no expectation that the world will someday come along with me.
 
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The idea of "perfecting" such an image is outside of the worldview of folks who consider selfies the whole point of having a camera built-in to their phones. Enthusiasts such as us are a dwindling demographic.
I doubt that we're a dwindling demographic. Those of us who use dedicated cameras are clearly a dwindling demographic. However, I doubt that those of us who strive to perfect an image are a dwindling demographic. My point is that all the people who have never strived to perfect an image used to use dedicated cameras but now use cell phone cameras.
 
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I doubt that we're a dwindling demographic. Those of us who use dedicated cameras are clearly a dwindling demographic. However, I doubt that those of us who strive to perfect an image are a dwindling demographic. My point is that all the people who have never strived to perfect an image used to use dedicated cameras but now use cell phone cameras.
There is no good way to know if those of us who care about image quality and are willing/motivated to make our images better are growing, dwindling or just treading water. You could be right. I base my guess on the fact that no one outside of places like this forum seems to know a good picture from a poor one (or if they can tell he difference, they do not seem to care).
 
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Actually much of the younger demographics skip these dedicated forums all together and use social media sites like Instagram or Reddit, where they can engage in multiple interests and sub-forums without dedicating their time to just one forum space.
 
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Actually much of the younger demographics skip these dedicated forums all together and use social media sites like Instagram or Reddit, where they can engage in multiple interests and sub-forums without dedicating their time to just one forum space.
My 5 year old niece is watching a lot of YouTube kids how to videos and her cooking and craft skills are simply amazing.
 
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One issue that might have been mentioned, but I think that the camera manufacturers not only need to help us take much better pictures to stand out from our phones (and that is hard since well used my PIxel takes really good images) , but also be much better marketeers of said capabilities, Nikon IMHO has the worst marketing of all camera manufacturers (maybe Olympus?)
 

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