Nikon or Canon Dilemma

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Not meant to start any Canon vs Nikon debate; I currently enjoy using both systems equally.

My dilemma is whether I should stay where I am at or progress with one of the two systems.

I currently have a Nikon D750 with several AF-D primes (24, 35, 50, 85, 180 and 300), but no usable zooms except for an 80-200mm f2.8 AF-ED two ring. Only other Nikon zooms I own are an old Nikon 28-105mm AF-D and a Nikon 17-55mm f2.8 AF-S DX (still use it on my D200). I would like a wide/normal zoom to use with my D750.

With Canon I have the opposite. I have a 7dmk2 with a 28mm f1.8 USM, 50mm f1.8 USM, 10-18 EF-S , 17-55mm f2.8 EF-S, 16-35mm f4.0 L, 70-200mm f2.8 L . I would like a full frame Canon body to use with my L lenses.

So, my budget is $1,200 max. I don't want to buy used as I have had bad luck over the past 3 years buying used, and I don't want to sell any of my equipment because I really enjoy using both systems.

Type of shooting I do varies ffom every day shooting, occasional weddings, portraits, sports, travel and nature.

Two choices I was thinking about were:

1. Nikon 16-35mm f4.0
2. Canon 6dmk2

The above two choices are the bedt within my limited budget.

p.s. Getting a 3rd system is not an option as I currently have a couple of Panasonic cameras (G3 ang GX85 with 5 Panasonic lenses). I use the GX85 for weekend travel and when I visit places where I need to not stand out. I also have a Canon T3i and a Canon T6 with two kit lenses for each plus 4 D200 bodies (I use these for loaning out to kids in a photo club I run).

Which of the two choices would you go with?
 
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You have to remember this is a Nikon forum. I don't think the members here want to get into a debate knowing that often the correct answer to your question is just a personal preference. They don't want to be fanboys or dump on other brands like people do on several other forums.

But, being a Nikon forum members here generally know more about Nikon than Canon.
 
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The distortion on the 16-35 at 16 is more than I was willing to fix in post so I sold mine, remember when sw fixes it you loose real estate on the stretch. If I was going to shoot UWA again I'd get the 14-24

p.s. I don't think I'd ask for Canon advice here, try fredmiranda's forum
 
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In your photography you might not notice, but with the Canon 6D Mark II you lose a lot of dynamic range:

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That's 2.5 stops at base ISO, which is quite significant.
 
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In your photography you might not notice, but with the Canon 6D Mark II you lose a lot of dynamic range:

View attachment 1651036

That's 2.5 stops at base ISO, which is quite significant.

That was one of the several drawbacks of going with the 6dmk2. Its dynamic range is nowhere near that of my D750. Plus the AF point selection method on the 6dmk2 is the biggest negative for me. With it's lower dynamic range, I wonder how much of an improvement I would get over my 7dmk2?

That info teeters me back into resesrching more (affordable) lens option for my D750. Having been away from Nikon for some time, I wasn't ready for facing the cold new reality that good Nikon glass is way more expensive than it used to be!
 
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You have to remember this is a Nikon forum. I don't think the members here want to get into a debate knowing that often the correct answer to your question is just a personal preference. They don't want to be fanboys or dump on other brands like people do on several other forums.

But, being a Nikon forum members here generally know more about Nikon than Canon.

Thanks! That's why I thought I'd post this in the non-Nikon section in the hopes there were others here with experience in both Nikonand Canon systems.

Don't get me wrong, I have been a diehard Nikon fan since 1984. The evidence is in all the Nikon equipment I have accumulated over the years and refuse to sell! I didn't even mention all the Nikon film bodies I own plus all the manual focus AiS lenses as well.

My journey into Canon was before the D500 was released. I needed an affirdable outfit for shooting sports, so I ended up doing the unthinkable: I plunged into Canon with a 7dmk2 with two L lenses followed by the 17-55mm f2.8 EF-S.

All was somewhat ok until I saw the Nikon D750 on sale and got one to use with all of my Nikon lenses.

The D750 is an amazing camera, but as I have painfully come to learn, it needs very good glass to perform at its best. Back in my old Nikon film days and early days of digital, that was never an issue. All my affirdable Nikon lenses performed exceptionally well on my film and crop sensor cameras. The only expensive lens I purchased back then was the Nikon 17-55mm f2.8DX.

Now it seems my choices are very limited. I either spend $2,000 on a decent lens like the Nikon 17-35mm f2.8 or hope to compromise with a more affordable option. So, either I get lucky and find a more affordable lens option, or I compromise with a less than stellar, entry level Canon full frame (6dmk2) to take advantage of the good Canon glass I already own.

My other option is to go the oposite direction altogether; forget about full frame and go with Nikon D500 for shooting sports. The D750 would then be for portraits and I would simply not shoot the occasional weddings.

Then again, the D500 is slightly over my current budget...
 
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You could get a mirrorless Canon RP which is FF and all your EF lenses will work via an AF adapter. Unfortunately I don't think the EF-S lenses will though. Another option is to get a Nikon mirrrorless Z50 which is APS-C and your 17-55mm DX will work perfectly on it via an adapter. You have lots of options!
 
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You could get a mirrorless Canon RP which is FF and all your EF lenses will work via an AF adapter. Unfortunately I don't think the EF-S lenses will though. Another option is to get a Nikon mirrrorless Z50 which is APS-C and your 17-55mm DX will work perfectly on it via an adapter. You have lots of options!

Thank! Only issue is that the Canon RP uses the same AF point selection found on the 6dmk2, T3i, T6, etc. I never knew how absolutely unintuitive and annoying it was to use that type of AF point selection method! Nikon definitely has the upper hand in this department because all of its cameras, even the entry level D3000 generation bodies can let you select an AF point using theround, rear control button. With Canon (unless you have a substantially more expensive body) in order to select an AF point while looking through the viewfinder you need to use two fingers at the same time. One finger has to press the AF point selector button while your thumb has to rotate the function wheel on the top front of the camera. You rotate that dial to the left or right until you find the AF point you want. It is a very, very slow process as you have wheel through quickly to find which AF point you need.

The 7dmk2 (crop sensor) is somewhat similar to Nikon but has a little joystick to select any AF area at any time without having to press any other button. As you know, Nikon makes it easy by just pressing the rear control button in any direction with only your thumb; you don't have to press two buttons at the same time.

In all honesty, the biggest deal breaker for me with the 6dmk2 is the AF point selection method. I can live with just one card slot and lower DR.
 
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Just over a year ago, I faced something a but similar, only I did a full switch ... a Nikon D750 kit for a Canon 6DMkII kit. Never looked back ... and I LOVE my 6D MkII!!

But, that doesn't mean the Nikon was "worse" ... not in the least!! I made the switch for one big reason ... to shake things up and force myself to learn a whole new system after decades in the Nikon ecosystem. Worked, as I think I've improved quite a bit in the past year in many respects!! A minor, secondary, reason was the social media connections possible with the 6D MkII are better than the D750. For example, I can transfer images from the 6D to my phone easily and quickly which makes my wife happy that she can post pictures with the "good camera" vs her iPhone!! (Yes, it's possible to transfer them with the D750, but clunky at best in terms of process!)

As for Jim's nifty chart about DR ... may be true from some sort of computer measurement, but I cannot see any difference at all between the DR with my 6D vs the D750 in more than a year of shooting. The one or two times I have faced a broad exposure range, I used a preset HDR setting I have and then merged in Aurora HDR 2019. Boom. Done!!

I've posted some detailed comments further down in this thread that detailed my transition in some detail. Have a look ... and I'll be happy to answer any questions you may have about the 6D MkII as I think I'm pretty up to snuff on it's operation!!

One thing I will suggest ... consider including the Canon 24-70 f4 L lens. I love mine!! Sharp as a tack, and the ability to use it as a macro lens has opened up a whole new avenue of photography that I am just beginning to explore. (Sure, it may not be as good as a dedicated macro lens, but it's at least 90% and that's good enough for me!!)

Cheers!!

Ken
 
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Just over a year ago, I faced something a but similar, only I did a full switch ... a Nikon D750 kit for a Canon 6DMkII kit. Never looked back ... and I LOVE my 6D MkII!!

But, that doesn't mean the Nikon was "worse" ... not in the least!! I made the switch for one big reason ... to shake things up and force myself to learn a whole new system after decades in the Nikon ecosystem. Worked, as I think I've improved quite a bit in the past year in many respects!! A minor, secondary, reason was the social media connections possible with the 6D MkII are better than the D750. For example, I can transfer images from the 6D to my phone easily and quickly which makes my wife happy that she can post pictures with the "good camera" vs her iPhone!! (Yes, it's possible to transfer them with the D750, but clunky at best in terms of process!)

As for Jim's nifty chart about DR ... may be true from some sort of computer measurement, but I cannot see any difference at all between the DR with my 6D vs the D750 in more than a year of shooting. The one or two times I have faced a broad exposure range, I used a preset HDR setting I have and then merged in Aurora HDR 2019. Boom. Done!!

I've posted some detailed comments further down in this thread that detailed my transition in some detail. Have a look ... and I'll be happy to answer any questions you may have about the 6D MkII as I think I'm pretty up to snuff on it's operation!!

One thing I will suggest ... consider including the Canon 24-70 f4 L lens. I love mine!! Sharp as a tack, and the ability to use it as a macro lens has opened up a whole new avenue of photography that I am just beginning to explore. (Sure, it may not be as good as a dedicated macro lens, but it's at least 90% and that's good enough for me!!)

Cheers!!

Ken

Thanks Ken!!

Please tell me about your experience with selecting AF points with the 6dmk2. Is it as cumbersome as with the old Rebel series bodies?

Also, if I went with the 6dmk2, I would be using my 16-35mm f4.0 L as a main lens together with my 70-200mm f2.8 L (non IS). For lower light shooting I would use my 28mm f1.8 USM and 50mm f1.8. I probably would hold off on spending any more money as my current budget is only $1,200 max.
 
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Thanks Ken!!

Please tell me about your experience with selecting AF points with the 6dmk2. Is it as cumbersome as with the old Rebel series bodies?

Also, if I went with the 6dmk2, I would be using my 16-35mm f4.0 L as a main lens together with my 70-200mm f2.8 L (non IS). For lower light shooting I would use my 28mm f1.8 USM and 50mm f1.8. I probably would hold off on spending any more money as my current budget is only $1,200 max.
I rarely change focus points when shooting using the eyepiece; however, changing them via the touch screen is a very easy process ... just a couple of taps after entering the "Q" menu and they are available in the eyepiece!

However, I do often change focus and exposure points when shooting in Live View and find it to be one of the true joys of the 6D mkII!!
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

Makes changing things up VERY easy - just a tap to change the spot!! I especially like to couple the touch points with a 2-second camera delay for exposure .. so I tap a spot, and 2 seconds later it takes the shot.

I've found the 24-70 is on 90+% of the time. But, I think you'll like the results with all of the lenses you have. I have the 17-40 f4 L, 70-200 f4 IS L, and a 50mm f1.4, all of which produce great images. I also have a 2x extender which happens to be hooked up with the 70-200 on the image above. Works very well!!

Ken
 
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Thank! Only issue is that the Canon RP uses the same AF point selection found on the 6dmk2, T3i, T6, etc. I never knew how absolutely unintuitive and annoying it was to use that type of AF point selection method! Nikon definitely has the upper hand in this department because all of its cameras, even the entry level D3000 generation bodies can let you select an AF point using theround, rear control button. With Canon (unless you have a substantially more expensive body) in order to select an AF point while looking through the viewfinder you need to use two fingers at the same time. One finger has to press the AF point selector button while your thumb has to rotate the function wheel on the top front of the camera. You rotate that dial to the left or right until you find the AF point you want. It is a very, very slow process as you have wheel through quickly to find which AF point you need.

The 7dmk2 (crop sensor) is somewhat similar to Nikon but has a little joystick to select any AF area at any time without having to press any other button. As you know, Nikon makes it easy by just pressing the rear control button in any direction with only your thumb; you don't have to press two buttons at the same time.

In all honesty, the biggest deal breaker for me with the 6dmk2 is the AF point selection method. I can live with just one card slot and lower DR.
Only reason I mention mirrorless is due to better AF precision. For example my D750 isn't nearly as precise in focusing in low light as compared to my Sony A7III. Either a Canon RP or Nikon Z50, would be both well within your budget and give new life to many of your lenses in either format. I'd also consider paring down one of your kits. I run both a Nikon and Sony kit, and while I have some overlap, I use both systems for very different reasons. Heck, even Sony might be an option using the Sigma MC-11 adapter. There is lots of documentation online describing what Canon native lenses work on Sony and the Sigma adapter.
 
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I rarely change focus points when shooting using the eyepiece; however, changing them via the touch screen is a very easy process ... just a couple of taps after entering the "Q" menu and they are available in the eyepiece!

However, I do often change focus and exposure points when shooting in Live View and find it to be one of the true joys of the 6D mkII!!
View attachment 1651045
Makes changing things up VERY easy - just a tap to change the spot!! I especially like to couple the touch points with a 2-second camera delay for exposure .. so I tap a spot, and 2 seconds later it takes the shot.

I've found the 24-70 is on 90+% of the time. But, I think you'll like the results with all of the lenses you have. I have the 17-40 f4 L, 70-200 f4 IS L, and a 50mm f1.4, all of which produce great images. I also have a 2x extender which happens to be hooked up with the 70-200 on the image above. Works very well!!

Ken

Thanks again!! When not shooting in live view, how well can you select an AF point? For example, lets say you are photographing a group of people as they are walking about but want to focus on one subject to frame him at the bottom right corner. How quickly would you be able to lock focus on that person at the bottom right side of your screen?

Reason I'm asking is because many times during weddings I need to capture the couple as they are moving about a crowded area. I'll offsdt them to a corner to show some of the background. This is usually a very quick, dynamic instance and the ability to quickly change AF spots is critical. Somewhat the same when I take travel shots; I find myself framing my kids in shots showing them at a corner of the screen with the backroom taking up 2/3 of the frame.
 
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Only reason I mention mirrorless is due to better AF precision. For example my D750 isn't nearly as precise in focusing in low light as compared to my Sony A7III. Either a Canon RP or Nikon Z50, would be both well within your budget and give new life to many of your lenses in either format. I'd also consider paring down one of your kits. I run both a Nikon and Sony kit, and while I have some overlap, I use both systems for very different reasons. Heck, even Sony might be an option using the Sigma MC-11 adapter. There is lots of documentation online describing what Canon native lenses work on Sony and the Sigma adapter.

Looks like the Sony is closer to the $2000 range at this time, do it puts it well over my budget.

The Canon RP seemed like a nice alternative, but it is very similar to the 6dmk2 in terms of AF. Plus I was reading that AF tracking on the 6dmk2 is better. Again, that info is just from what I have been reading ad I haven't used eithet one of those cameras.
 
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Nice problem to have !
Good luck, substantial improvement to your collection will not be easy.
Thanks! Believe it or not this "dilemma " started a little over a week ago. I was happy with both of my dslr setups, so I ordered a Nikon 55mm f2,8 Micro AiS. I was hoping to use it as a shortcut to copy a bunch of slides (scanning has been taking forever). The copy I got was not sharp at all on my D750, so I sent it back. I thought about ordering another copy or even a 60mm newer AF version, but the more I thought about it, the more I thought it was a waste of money. I get decent results with my scanner and a short macro would not be too practical. So, I have the store credit for the return, why not spend a bit more and get something I can use on a more regular basis? My max budget is $1,200, so my options are somewhat limited in improving either of the two somewhat incomplete systems I own. Only two choices I can come up with were a 16-35 for my Nikon setup, or a 6dmk2 for my Canon setup.
 
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Thanks again!! When not shooting in live view, how well can you select an AF point? For example, lets say you are photographing a group of people as they are walking about but want to focus on one subject to frame him at the bottom right corner. How quickly would you be able to lock focus on that person at the bottom right side of your screen?

Reason I'm asking is because many times during weddings I need to capture the couple as they are moving about a crowded area. I'll offsdt them to a corner to show some of the background. This is usually a very quick, dynamic instance and the ability to quickly change AF spots is critical. Somewhat the same when I take travel shots; I find myself framing my kids in shots showing them at a corner of the screen with the backroom taking up 2/3 of the frame.
I think this may answer your question. It’s from the manual. You can do the same thing on the rear LCD with a touch which is what I do.

Hope this helps.

Ken
 

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I think this may answer your question. It’s from the manual. You can do the same thing on the rear LCD with a touch which is what I do.

Hope this helps.

Ken
Thank you Ken! Looks like it's a two step process to select A F point. Definitely food for thought in helping me make my decision. Thanks again!
 
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I went to my local BestBuy to see the 6dmk2 in real life. They also had the EOS RP and the Nikon D500. While I liked the heft and feel of the D500, it was out of my price range and did not have an FX sensor. Very different camera for what I plan to shoot. They didn't have the Nikon 16-35mm f4.0, so I was not able to try it out.

I ended up going with the 6dmk2. The focal points can be selected like on my Nikon bodies. Plus, at least I'll be able to use it with my Canon 16-35mm f4.0L.

I'm not "jumping ship" nor am I going to become a fanboy of either brand. I enjoy using both Canon and Nikon systems. They have their own unique feel. Chances are I'll be looking into the Nikon 24-70mm f2.8 in the future.... :)
 

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